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Just a white canucks thoughts on BLM

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posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:21 AM
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I'm not even close to being in the thick of this issue, but I've been watching america from my igloo here in canada for years now, and I seem to remember a terribly handled relief effort in New Orleans a few years back where many black lives didn't seem to matter at all. It seems to have been an absolute travesty and should be remembered as one of americas lowest moments.

Could this atrocity be a huge (but silent) contributor to the current situation?
edit on 12-7-2016 by wheresthebody because: less inflamatory wording




posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:50 AM
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As someone that lived in Louisiana.... well here is a poorly kept secret; Louisiana's govt is so horribly corrupt they couldnt make a profit selling whiskey in a whore house.

its many times more likely that it was incompetence or corruption or a combination of the two than racism...

Before the BUT BUSH... comes out; the fed (as it was explained to me by fema workers at the time) had to have a request from the Governor to move in and get to work, and the governor at the time was very slow to make the request.

Also... as someone that has visited the Cold Lake Canada area... stones and glass houses my friend.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:53 AM
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As a white canuck with a black brother-in-law, I can assure you we aren't any better in the systemic discrimination department. Oh, the stories he tells us about police profiing is manifest in reality.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:55 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Fair enough, Canada indeed has a dark history, just look into the horrors of native schools, or the japanese internment camps durring ww2.

But do you feel that the mishandling of the Katrina relief efforts appeared to be the result of racism to those most impacted by it?



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

I understand on the face of it... yea it could appear that way...

But if you dont take into the facts of the corruption and incompetence folks are making judgement's based on 1 part of a 4 part puzzle.

Unfortunately appearance has become much more important than facts since I was younger.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

I'm just thinking that there is more the development of BLM than police shootings.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: wheresthebody
I'm not even close to being in the thick of this issue, but I've been watching america from my igloo here in canada for years now, and I seem to remember a terribly handled relief effort in New Orleans a few years back where many black lives didn't seem to matter at all. It was an absolute travesty and should be remembered as one of americas lowest moments. Here in the great white north, we were appalled by the blatant racism and utter lack of concern that was oozing from many of our southern neighbors.

Could this atrocity be a huge (but silent) contributor to the current situation?


Your problem is that you're viewing America through a filtered, biased lens. The people in New Orleans who were trapped, did not listen to the warnings to leave. The blame for problems that arose afterwards thanks to Ray "Chocolate City" Nagin.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

My media sources were far more limited when these event were unfolding.

I also remember hearing about hordes of people being locked in a sports dome...



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:28 AM
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NEW ORLEANS – A day-by-day look at Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath:
Wednesday, Aug. 24: — Tropical Depression 12 strengthens into Tropical Storm Katrina over the Central Bahamas; a hurricane warning is issued for the southeastern Florida coast.
Thursday, Aug. 25: — Hurricane Katrina strikes Florida between Hallandale Beach and North Miami Beach as a Category 1 hurricane with 80 mph winds.
Friday, Aug. 26: — Katrina weakens over land to a tropical storm before moving out over the Gulf of Mexico. It grows to a Category 2 hurricane with 100 mph winds, veering north and west toward Mississippi and Louisiana. — 10,000 National Guard troops are dispatched across the Gulf Coast.
Saturday, Aug. 27: — Eleven people dead in Florida from hurricane-related causes. — Katrina becomes a Category 3 storm, with 115 mph winds; a hurricane warning is issued for Louisiana's southeastern coast, including New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain, and for the northern Gulf coast. — New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin declares a state of emergency and urges residents in low-lying areas to evacuate. — Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour declares a state of emergency. A mandatory evacuation is ordered for Hancock County. — Coastal Gulf residents jam freeways and gas stations as they rush to evacuate.
Sunday, Aug. 28: — Katrina grows into a Category 5 storm with 160 mph winds and heads for the northern Gulf coast. — Nagin orders a mandatory evacuation for New Orleans. But 10 shelters are also set up, including the Superdome, for those unable to leave. — Evacuation orders are posted all along the Mississippi coast. — Alabama Gov. Bob Riley declares a state of emergency.
Monday, Aug. 29: — Katrina, a Category 4 hurricane with 145 mph winds, makes landfall near Buras, La., at 6:10 a.m. CDT (7:10 a.m. EDT). — President Bush makes emergency disaster declarations for Louisiana and Mississippi, freeing up federal funds. — Katrina rips two holes in the Superdome's roof. Some 10,000 storm refugees are inside. — At least eight Gulf Coast refineries shut down or reduce operations. — Airports close in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Biloxi, Mobile and Pensacola. Hundreds of flights are canceled or diverted.


there was plenty of time for people to get out of new orleans. they gave a full 2 day warning. those who stayed in new orleans had no means to leave, or no where to go.
the goverment as well as the leaders in new orleans failed miserably. thats apparent.
i dont think it had anything to do with the black community, it had to do with lack of preparation, and the storm being one that set a precedent.
i hope they learned from their mistakes.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:39 AM
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originally posted by: wheresthebody
a reply to: TheBulk

My media sources were far more limited when these event were unfolding.

I also remember hearing about hordes of people being locked in a sports dome...


Yeah thanks to their black mayor.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:49 AM
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As another Canadian, methinks Obama's Sharia government and Soros, a Rothschild agent, are doing all of this and riling up the blacks as agents for their massive attempt at takeover, and UN Sharia compliant government.


edit on 12-7-2016 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

Part of that was the local govt telling them it was a safe place to ride out the storm... problem was nobody at the local level planned for food/water or post storm transportation.

I remember a kid stole a bus and drove his family out of the danger area... whole parking lots full of buses that were not used to get people to safety.

eta: I grew up In florida, and have seen good and bad responses in the state of florida...Louisiana screwed that storm response up from the word go...

It takes a while to figure out what needs to be done, but you have to honestly look at your mistakes to learn from them... and Louisiana didnt do that. I fully expect them to make the same mistakes the next time that happens.
edit on 12-7-2016 by Irishhaf because: additional thought



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: wheresthebody
I'm not even close to being in the thick of this issue, but I've been watching america from my igloo here in canada for years now, and I seem to remember a terribly handled relief effort in New Orleans a few years back where many black lives didn't seem to matter at all. It was an absolute travesty and should be remembered as one of americas lowest moments. Here in the great white north, we were appalled by the blatant racism and utter lack of concern that was oozing from many of our southern neighbors.

Could this atrocity be a huge (but silent) contributor to the current situation?


What is your knowledge of black on black violence or the statistics of violent black crime? Do you think any of this is a much bigger contributor?



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

That atrocity and the myriad of others over the past 400+ years. It's a cumulative thing.

The fact that we even sitll make a distinction is pretty mind blowing to me.


The fact that some people just can't admit that there's a problem even more so. Predjudice and the like are there, whether conscious or not. We've been wired for it. All of us.

Understanding Prejudice

All lives can't matter until black lives matter. Blue lives aren't a thing. You are not blue. You can take off your uniform. Quit your job. You can't take off being black.




posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk




What is your knowledge of black on black violence or the statistics of violent black crime? Do you think any of this is a much bigger contributor?


Not the topic of this thread. There are more than enough threads on this site that have been hijacked with those discussions.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Sorry Lucidity, there are quite a lot of things you can point out and be completely justified in doing so ... we still have a lot of things to do to improve things for all in our country.

But this was not an atrocity, and I highly doubt it was racially motivated... this is coming from growing up in Hurricane alley, and having lived in Louisiana for several years right before this happened. So I have a good idea of how to prepare and what to do in the event of a hurricane, and what happens when the govt is weak and or corrupt.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Sounds like an absolute cluster f$%#, no wonder so many people lost confidence in their government.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

I also thought part of what happened in NOLA after Katrina was an effort to gentrify the area...and maybe further dilute the culture, monetize tourism and the music.

from the 10 year anniversary
www.nytimes.com...
news.nationalgeographic.com...

ETA...and yest, the corruption is legion!
More pervasive than anything Detroit has seen! [I was born in Detroit]
edit on Tue Jul 12 2016 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

Probably that as well as the shooting of innocent blacks by policemen



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity



All lives can't matter until black lives matter. Blue lives aren't a thing. You are not blue. You can take off your uniform. Quit your job. You can't take off being black.



The statistics show that black lives dont matter to black people. Get your own house in order before you start putting the responsibility on the rest of us.




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