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N.C. governor signs bill restricting release of police video footage

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posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:39 AM
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originally posted by: Blazemore2000
a reply to: In4ormant

Then you are deaf, dumb, blind and unable to smell. As well as completely delusional.


Hope you never need an LEO's help.




posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:39 AM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: In4ormant

Court orders to get video by this law? And/or probably laws in all/most states? I didn't find much information about how we get stuff NOW as opposed to these "new" laws.



Same way. It's called a subpoena.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:40 AM
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originally posted by: lordcomac
And yet, any time there's a problem and that video needs to be public, it's hidden- or conveniently lost.

It needs to be publicly available in the event of an issue. The police can't be in charge of deciding if they want to show the video of their boys breaking the law.


Site your source please. When did they "lose" a video?



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant


originally posted by: In4ormant
Transparency to who? Everyone? Why should you be allowed to see my speeding ticket stop? The video is still available if there is a problem.


From what I understand from the ACLU statement, that is not true:

The ACLU said if the bill becomes law, police will have "broad authority to keep video footage secret – even from individuals who are filmed."

Also, seems like the LEO of your notional speeding ticket stop would be given a chance to testify before a judge demands footage is made public - you would not.
Aside from the fact that your speeding ticket is hardly of any interest for the public if you're not getting murdered in it.


originally posted by: In4ormant
You imply that TPTB are going to suppress evidence.

Every chance they get.
edit on 12-7-2016 by ColCurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant

Why is that? Must I adore them for them to do their job? It must be nice to be able to choose when you want to do your job the way it was meant to be done and when not. Reminds me of when the NYPD openly campaigned to have professional privilege for themselves. Not that they didn't already enjoy that.. illegally... but they wanted it officially approved. That's the mindset your dealing with. Chuckleheads.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: ColCurious

originally posted by: In4ormant
Transparency to who? Everyone? Why should you be allowed to see my speeding ticket stop? The video is still available if there is a problem.


From what I understand from the ACLU statement, that is not true.


The ACLU said if the bill becomes law, police will have "broad authority to keep video footage secret – even from individuals who are filmed."


Also, seems like the LEO of your notional speeding ticket stop would be given a chance to testify before a judge demands footage is made public - you would not.


originally posted by: In4ormant
You imply that TPTB are going to suppress evidence.

Every chance they get.



The ACLU dramatizing something, you don't say.

Every chance they get? How's that working out for them?

You are just peddling fear.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant




Why should you be allowed to see my speeding ticket stop?


Why not?
Let's keep the playing field level.
"If you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to hide"..... Right? Let me put this another way...You are a Public Servant. EVERYTHING you do while on duty should be public knowledge. I don't care if it's what you had for lunch, if you are in uniform, it's the public's business.
edit on 12-7-2016 by DAVID64 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:55 AM
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originally posted by: Blazemore2000
a reply to: In4ormant

Why is that? Must I adore them for them to do their job? It must be nice to be able to choose when you want to do your job the way it was meant to be done and when not. Reminds me of when the NYPD openly campaigned to have professional privilege for themselves. Not that they didn't already enjoy that.. illegally... but they wanted it officially approved. That's the mindset your dealing with. Chuckleheads.


Your lumping the 1% with the rest of them. There are over 900k LEO's in the U.S. from the federal level down. You cherry pick the few percentage of cases to paint a poor portrait of them all. That's deceptive and dishonest. Hypocritical to say the least.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:56 AM
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Arrest records are printed in my local paper. I fail to see how this cam footage would be any different. I understand the need to not hinder ongoing investigations, but other than that why would this footage be unavailable?



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:56 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: In4ormant




Why should you be allowed to see my speeding ticket stop?


Why not?
Let's keep the playing field level.
"If you've done nothing wrong, you have nothing to hide"..... Right? Let me put this another way...You are a Public Servant. EVERYTHING you do while on duty should be public knowledge. I don't care if it's what you had for lunch, if you are in uniform, it's the public's business.


And their location, up to the minute?
Undercover cops as well?
edit on 12-7-2016 by In4ormant because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:59 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant

Uh no. When they actually start policing themselves with even half the zealousness they do the general public... then I'll think about not lumping them all together. Until then, they can enjoy the scorn they've earned.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant

Argue my point, don't move the goal posts.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: Blazemore2000
a reply to: In4ormant

Uh no. When they actually start policing themselves with even half the zealousness they do the general public... then I'll think about not lumping them all together. Until then, they can enjoy the scorn they've earned.


"They"

There you go again. I get it. It's easy to target "them"
Hate on cops as a whole for the few bad apples, until you need one.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:03 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: In4ormant

Argue my point, don't move the goal posts.


Your point was EVERYTHING they do should be public. The things I cited would fall under everything. The goal post wasn't moved, you just failed to see how far away it actually was.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant

lol It's more like the few good apples that are left. But you go on with your delusions. You're not worth conversing with. So... buh bye.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: DAVID64

If you really want to see cops taking a dump because you believe you have "the right to know" how everything comes out, be prepared for some up close shots of the action



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant


originally posted by: In4ormant

You are just peddling fear.

Not fear. Just the appropriate vigilance.

Something my Nation had to learn from two surveillance-states in our past.

If your citizenry isn't vigilant now, they're about to repeat the same lesson.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:14 AM
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originally posted by: ColCurious
a reply to: In4ormant


originally posted by: In4ormant

You are just peddling fear.

Not fear. Just the appropriate vigilance.

Something my Nation had to learn from two surveillance-states in our past.

If your citizenry isn't vigilant now, they're about to repeat the same lesson.


There is no police state coming.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:26 AM
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originally posted by: In4ormant

originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: In4ormant

Court orders to get video by this law? And/or probably laws in all/most states? I didn't find much information about how we get stuff NOW as opposed to these "new" laws.



Same way. It's called a subpoena.


See now, I'm not sure this is correct.

After an incident (be that an accident or a complaint or what have you), within a day or two, I can go right down the the police station and get a report of the incident as written by the officer who responded.

Without having to get a court order or a subpoena.

To me, the body cam video is a part of this incident report, the objective recording in support or corroboration of the report. So why would it be treated any differently?

Why would I or should I have to go to court, hire a lawyer, pay for it?


edit on 7/12/2016 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

Yeah but, all joking aside, we all know that's not what's at issue here.




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