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Terraforming of other planets: For or Against?

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posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 11:34 PM
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For or against, state your case.

Personaly, I'm against it. For one, I feel that the Earth if left unpoluted, and uncorrupted will eventually cleanse itself back to it's original condition. Also keep in mind that humans are a very demanding organism. Could another planet be cultivated enough to provide us with our needs? We all see the effect that a couple hundred years has on our planet. Would we do the same thing to another planet with a similar (inhabitable) atmosphere? We should work on righting the wrongs here before attempting to bring another planet into our midst.




posted on Jan, 17 2005 @ 11:43 PM
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I'm absolutely for it! I want to be one of the first Martians!



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 05:37 PM
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I'm with you there.. I think with the right tech both Mars and Venus could be made habitable in a reasonable amount of time. Why should we limit ourselves to one planet.. and it's not like there's much worth saving on those barren rocks right now anyway


Maybe if we moved there, we could let the earth alone to recove some.

Osiris



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 05:44 PM
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Originally posted by otlg27
I'm with you there.. I think with the right tech both Mars and Venus could be made habitable in a reasonable amount of time.


Mars maybe but Venus? Not likely.

zebu.uoregon.edu...



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 05:51 PM
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I am for it.

It would be really interesting to see what stays and what goes as far as an ecosystem goes as far as plant and animal life is concerned. I also think that by that time the earth will have population problems so that seems like a very good solution.



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
Mars maybe but Venus? Not likely.

I don't see why not, as long as the gravity is half-assed close, I am sure we could change that atmosphere somehow, just like we could create/change Mars atmosphere. That is what terraforming is all about, isn't it?



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 08:16 PM
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.
If it is an essentially inert planet that has never had life or civilizations. I don't have that much problem with it. After there has been a good study of the geology of the planet.
Keep in mind that complete planet surface terraforming is a long way off in the future. There is a magnetic field to think of, correct distance from star(s), mineral/chemical makeup, available water/oxygen etc.

If a planet has an existing working eco system, I would hope that we/whoever would make a very definite attempt to record the details, try to preserve some portion of pure virgin original eco-system and make any habitation of the planet be as integral with existing biology as possible.

If a former eco-system is now dead I would hope some attempt at preserving fossils and any remaining organic matter for study. If there was a former civilization anywhere I would hope that ruins and artifacts would be preserved also for study.
.



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by IronDogg

Originally posted by intrepid
Mars maybe but Venus? Not likely.

I don't see why not, as long as the gravity is half-assed close, I am sure we could change that atmosphere somehow, just like we could create/change Mars atmosphere. That is what terraforming is all about, isn't it?


We'd have to have a lot hardier terraforming machines on Venus than on Mars. They'd have to withstand crushing atmospheric pressures, clouds of sulfuric acid, and surface temperatures that can melt lead at least at the beginning.



posted on Jan, 18 2005 @ 10:55 PM
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Venus has a huge advantage over Mars for terraforming the entire planet.

It still has a magnetic field. So if you get a decent atmosphere developed it will be protected.

Any atmosphere on Mars tends to get blown off by the Solar wind.

If you don't mind living under a dome Mars is the easier project.
.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 07:14 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid
Mars maybe but Venus? Not likely.

zebu.uoregon.edu...


You'd be surprised.. it is theoretically possible (I know Venus is a very harsh place at the moment). Sorry I'm in a rush to get to the office, or I would write about 9 pages on how to do it


Osiris



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 04:16 PM
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Well... would it not be possible (or at least conceivable) to create and establish a magnetic field around Mars to hold in an atmosphere? To just simply say that we can't (in my mind anyway) is wrong... At some point in our future (whether it is 40 years from now or 400 years from now), we will have technology to terraform even the most stubborn of planets in any way we want...
I would guess that the future definitions of terraforming will include abilities to change everything and anything to suit our needs, including temperature, magnetic fields, and even gravity maybe... Why not?



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 04:24 PM
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I am all for it , it will be major step for humans to take as a species. The earth can only sustain a set amount of humans and unless people want some type of "Logans Run" type population control in the future expanding into the solar system is the way to go.

We have to in the long run get out of even this solar system if we dont want to die with our sun.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 04:53 PM
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I'd go for Venus.
An induced series of chemical process that break down the CO2 and sulphur compounds could turn into processes that were self replicating. It might not take as long as one might initially think.

With a gravity almost 90% of earth's, the possibilities are amazing. Also, it is closer than Mars. The big problem is the rotational period.

However, what business do we have trying any of this while we are in the process of destroying this planet?



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by revengeogmakhno
With a gravity almost 90% of earth's, the possibilities are amazing. Also, it is closer than Mars. The big problem is the rotational period.

However, what business do we have trying any of this while we are in the process of destroying this planet?


The way I read it, it was 90 times the Earths preasure, at surface levels. BTW that last sentance is a damn valid point. Maybe we should get our house in order before we try to build others.



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
The way I read it, it was 90 times the Earths preasure, at surface levels. BTW that last sentance is a damn valid point. Maybe we should get our house in order before we try to build others.


One may lead to the other though. For example:

1) Technology used to terraform Venus could be directly applicable to problems currently facing the earth (green house gas management and mitigation).

2) Terraforming and colonising other planets could relieve the burden on planet earth.

3) Mining of resources from other planets can mean the two planets can share equally in the load of fueling our socieities.

4) The lack of certain compounds on venus (i.e. Oil) would force the development of cost effective alternate fuel sources that could be applied back to earth.

Again, I could go on and on, but the idea is the same.. Kill two flocks of birds with one stone


Osiris



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 05:27 PM
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Something else to consider and I don't know whether it's a plus or minus but Venus' day is longer than it's year.

spaceinfo.jaxa.jp...



posted on Jan, 19 2005 @ 05:39 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
Something else to consider and I don't know whether it's a plus or minus but Venus' day is longer than it's year.

spaceinfo.jaxa.jp...


Yep.. that's the one 'big' problem. Probably the biggest to solve, but not insurmountable. For people it would be not much of an issue, you just have good blinds on the light side and live there. The problem is the dark side. However, a *very* large mylar mirror on orbit should do the trick to light the dark side. The dark side could even have simulated 24 hour days if the mirror could be rotated while on orbit.

The light side would always be light, but c'est la vie.. close your blinds


Osiris



posted on Jan, 21 2005 @ 02:29 PM
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look at my poll about terra-forming mars:

www.abovetopsecret.com...





posted on Jan, 21 2005 @ 02:38 PM
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Definately for.

I see no problem with it. It would be a magnificent scientific achievement.



Originally posted by djohnsto77
I'm absolutely for it! I want to be one of the first Martians!

What would it be for Venus?
Venitian?
Venusian?
Venu People?



posted on Jan, 21 2005 @ 03:01 PM
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I am conditionaly against this idea.
I would be for it if and only if we know for certain that there is no native life on the planet even if it is microscopic Look at the number of extinct species we have here on our own planet. Look at what happened to the American Indian when the Europeans came over, there were more deaths by smallpox, measles mumps etc than were actually killed by the Europeans in battle.
The flipside of which, if there is native life what may happen if / when there is a mutation of terran and alien dna. This could prove to be devastating to both Terran as well as Alien (Remember the Andromeda Strain).
Note, I am not naive enough to beleive that given the chance, humanity will not go ahead with such an endevour. We will spread ourselves wherever we can.



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