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A Serious Question About Space

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posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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I and my family were re watching the First Apollo Moon landing. We believe it to be a real event and not a conspiracy.

As we watched and listened I noticed a few times Neil mentioned that from the space craft as they traveled to the moon they could not see any stars. And Once on the moon he said he could look out into the absolute blackness and see only the earth. He could see no stars from the moon.

Why is it they could not see the stars from half way to the moon and the moon?

Even photos taken from the moon, one could not see the stars.

Are they able to see the stars or other planets from ISS?




posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:32 PM
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what stars? in by reference to the small lights visible in the sky on a clear night?



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn


As we watched and listened I noticed a few times Neil mentioned that from the space craft as they traveled to the moon they could not see any stars.

Through the porthole or through the camera?

The contrast had to be turned way down because they were bathed in sunlight. It was too bright.

A real simple answer why they couldn't see the stars, it was daytime.
edit on 5-7-2016 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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They couldn't see the stars when close to and on the moon because of the amount of light reflected back by the moon's surface and by the Earth. The glare was just too much. For every photon of starlightbthat they saw, there are millions from the Moon and Earth.

Now on the Earth, it is possible to get special filters that allow starlight to be seen from the upper layers of the atmosphere. The Blackbird aircraft had celestial navigation systems that used the brightest stars.



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn I watched it as a kid, but dont remember that. I dont believe in flat earth, but I forced myself to watch a video about it the other day. What you are stating would back that up. My pops is a scientist, and he was over today. I almost asked him a couple questions about that, but was too embarassed, to let him know I even watched that or entertained the theory for a second




posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Daytime, all the time because he / they were in orbit.
But, even if you were eclipsed by the moon or sun you still would not see many stars. We only see this many stars through the naked eye from earth because of the atmosphere.



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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I thought I remembered it being kind of dark. They should have been able to see them



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: ChesterJohn
Are they able to see the stars or other planets from ISS?
It's easier when the ISS is in the Earth's shadow, as in this photo:

www.nasa.gov...

Based on the caption I think that's probably Venus in the lower left, with the moon to the upper right of that, and of course you can see stars all around.

During the day or on the moon of course the stars are still there, but it's a contrast issue. The pupils conscrict to compensiate for the bright light of the sun which doesn't let in much light from the much dimmer stars making them harder to see.

In fact try this experiment. Have some bright lights on inside, then immediately go outside at night and look for stars at night. You might not be able to see them at first because your pupils are still constricted. As your pupils dilate to let in more light, you can see more and more stars. There was no chance for this to happen on the moon if the surface was in view because the moons surface reflected a lot of sunlight.

edit on 201675 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 06:36 PM
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The video is posted over here:

ATS thread - Stars Can't Be Seen from Outer Space

They can be seen from space btw. You just have to be on the dark side of earth because the sun is so d@mn bright (and the sun is a star too!).



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn


Virtually all spacecraft orientate themselves by watching a few stars. So they can see them. Humans can't it is because the human eye is less sensitive to the spectrum of light than the instruments. 'About like cats and dogs can see better at night than we can.



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 08:31 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Thank you everybody who chimed in on this. One of those things I'd been wondering about, but keep not getting around to looking up why stars aren't visible (or are less visible) from "space." I used to have this idea in my mind that from space you could see so many stars your brain would explode from the sheer beauty and magnitude (heh) of it.

On another note, if you ever get the chance, schedule an eye doctor appointment where they're going to dilate your eyes in the winter around closing time, when it's already dark out. Get somewhere clear after you leave, and have a gaze up. I got my hands on a bottle of those drops from a friend who works at an ophthalmologist office years ago, dropped 'em in, and it was simply amazing what you could see in the night sky with the naked eye. Granted - not something you should do often, as I'm sure forcing your pupils open is less than ideal, but it was, admittedly, awesome.



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 10:05 PM
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Thank you everyone. I am glad that I got some straight forward answers and I was happy to read all of your responses.



posted on Jul, 6 2016 @ 02:02 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn
Good question though. I learned something now. Thanks for posting this




posted on Jul, 6 2016 @ 02:05 AM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Imagine what we might see on the dark side of the moon...




posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: Akragon

Is there absolutely no way for NASA or any others, to photograph or look at the dark side of the Moon to see what is over there. Or is it just that dark?

From what I have read and heard, Niel Armstrong and the other astronauts could not see the stars even as they passed behind the moon in its shadow. They may have been out of direct sunlight but they never could see any stars from the moon the only objects they could see was the Sun and the Earth.

It was pretty freaky to listen to the radio recording at the time the went behind the moon, it sounded like screams.

edit on 7-7-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 07:49 PM
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The iris in the human eye works a lot like a camera iris. In dark places, the iris opens up to allow more light in, so you can see better in the dark. When in a bright place, your iris closes to allow less light in to your eyes so that the bright object doesn't blind you, it makes it difficult to see fainter less bright objects.

The moon reflects a lot of sunlight, causing the iris of your eyes to close a little, and making it that much harder to see the dimmer stars in the sky. Even if they were in the spaceship, and their iris were adjusted to see inside the spaceship and the instruments, looking outside the window would make it difficult for their eyes to see any stars too.

Law enforcement use this to their advantage at night, when the pull you over for a traffic violation they will shine their spotlight directly into your side view mirror or just at your head in general, so when you look back all you see is the bright spotlight and nothing else around it, including other lights. You can try this your self by shining a flashlight in your eyes while looking at the night sky.



posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

There is no dark side of the Moon (unless you're talking about Pink Floyd). The Moon rotates so all of its "sides" receive sunlight.

There is, however, the far side of the Moon which is never visible from Earth. There are many, many images of the far side.
wms.lroc.asu.edu...


Niel Armstrong and the other astronauts could not see the stars even as they passed behind the moon in its shadow.
False.
edit on 7/7/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: Phage
Ok far side, which never faces us.

But Phage, I heard him say himself that all he could see was a really black sky and the earth. He could not see the stars from the moon. Even from the space capsule on the way to the moon he said it was totally black and the only thing visible was the Earth, Sun and Moon.

Not one of the pictures and videos shown had no stars in it.

If you have some that do I would like to see them
edit on 7-7-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Even from the space capsule on the way to the moon he said it was totally black and the only thing visible was the Earth, Sun and Moon.
I have not heard him say that. I've heard him say that he could not see stars while on the surface of the Moon or while in orbit on the dayside of the Moon.



Not one of the pictures and videos shown had no stars in it.
I misunderstood when you said this:

Is there absolutely no way for NASA or any others, to photograph or look at the dark side of the Moon to see what is over there.
In any case, all of the landings were on the dayside of the Moon. I don't know why there would have been any attempt to photograph stars while on the nightside of the Moon, the handheld Hasselblads were not well suited to the task.


edit on 7/7/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2016 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes I agree the Hasselblad cameras were attached to the front of their suits and were very bulky.

I never heard any of the Astronauts say anything about day side or night side of the moon. They never made any comments about the stars other than they looked out an only saw deep blackness and the Earth. Indicating they did not see any stars in the sky from the moon or the space craft on the way there.

I have requested pictures from NASA from the spacecraft as they flew around the far side of the moon and so far have not heard from them. I still have the pictures from 1969 and none of them show stars in the sky.

This is why I asked the question.

This may be why many feel that they never really went to the moon.


edit on 7-7-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



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