It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ohio Fashion Police

page: 1
5
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 02:52 AM
link   
gulfnews.com...

The video showed that the police officers carrying assault rifles approached the hotel entrance where a man dressed in Kandoura and Arab headdress was talking on phone in Arabic.

Panicked police officers yelled at the Emirati man to get on to the ground. The man who was visibly traumatised was later taken down by the officers and handcuffed.

. . .

Later, when it was established that it was a false alarm, the police removed the handcuffs and tried to explain the situation to Al Menhali.

However, moments later Al Menhali collapsed to the ground and was taken to the nearest hospital. The Emirati businessman is receiving treatment at Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio.

Meanwhile, the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs told Gulf News on Saturday that they were following up the case with the UAE Embassy in Washington.

The ministry advised Emiratis to refrain from wearing the national dress when travelling abroad and specifically in public spaces to ensure their safety.


At 13:08 in the video you will see the man collapse.

This all seems to have started with a hotel clerk texting her sister. The consequences will be serious.



+11 more 
posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 04:12 AM
link   
a reply to: Kester

better safe than sorry. Maybe they should consider dressing down when visiting the States, especially considering foreign women are expected to dress up when visiting their land. Return the courtesy eh?



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 04:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Kester

Our troops had the same problem in Vietnam. They couldn't tell friend from foe because the enemy no longer wore a uniform. Considering the daily onslaught of Islamic Extremism I am surprised this doesn't happen more often. I don't know the solution because it seems to me we are damned either way.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 04:42 AM
link   
a reply to: Kester

The media conditioning is so strong ...wow....."hey look he has a turban he must be a terrorist" ....



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 05:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Kester

Our troops had the same problem in Vietnam. They couldn't tell friend from foe because the enemy no longer wore a uniform. Considering the daily onslaught of Islamic Extremism I am surprised this doesn't happen more often. I don't know the solution because it seems to me we are damned either way.


Thing is terrorists rarely use thetr full islamic dress in attacks on the west so as too blend it.


The ones in there national dress are likely the least likey to cause a attack.
edit on 3-7-2016 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 05:51 AM
link   


I don't even know how to approach this really? The hysteria is strong here, but you're damned if you do and damned if you don't these days. He would have definitely been outta place in a town like Avon Ohio, but wow talk about jumping to conclusions.

I think it could have been handled a little less police statey by the cops, but hey, I guess that's the America we live in now.

...smh



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 06:01 AM
link   

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: Kester

The media conditioning is so strong ...wow....."hey look he has a turban he must be a terrorist" ....


I'm TOTALLY gonna be that guy. Are you ready?

He is not wearing a turban. It's called a kaffiyeh.




posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 06:15 AM
link   
a reply to: SgtHamsandwich

Its a running joke around here, my girls flatmate is Indian and when he dons on the turban we can expect all sorts of reactions out in public ...i should have been clearer



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 06:31 AM
link   

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: SgtHamsandwich

Its a running joke around here, my girls flatmate is Indian and when he dons on the turban we can expect all sorts of reactions out in public ...i should have been clearer




Ah, I get ya know.

My wife works at a local cancer center and the doctor that used to work there was a Sikh and they used to joke about all the stares and response he used to get from the podunk white folk in the Hospital. He was a super nice guy, very traditional and out of place in our lil bumpkin town, but super super nice.

A lil bit of education goes a long way when encountering folks of different nationality's.




posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 07:15 AM
link   
Here's the thing:

With both San Bernardino and Orlando, the people who carried out the attack had neighbors who were suspicious who openly admitted they didn't report them because they didn't want to seem racist.

And incidents like this one are why they didn't. Now all the people involved like this are going to be fried and lambasted, recommended for "sensitivity training."

So what should people do?



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 07:49 AM
link   
You can't have it both ways. For a moment It could be suspected the OP author was a provocateur, but viewing previous posts, it is doubtful. Though we do have a population of them here on ATS, no one can deny. This is sad indeed, but in the same breath a necessary evil in our society as the outcome could have been otherwise and lethal. This week alone many, many were killed in two separate car bombings, the most recent in Baghdad.
Let us hope nothing arises this 4th of July nationwide. There were no winners here, none.
edit on 3-7-2016 by Plotus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
Here's the thing:

With both San Bernardino and Orlando, the people who carried out the attack had neighbors who were suspicious who openly admitted they didn't report them because they didn't want to seem racist.

And incidents like this one are why they didn't. Now all the people involved like this are going to be fried and lambasted, recommended for "sensitivity training."

So what should people do?


How about making judgments based on actions and not appearances???

According to the article, the clerk claimed --


...that a hotel patron pledged allegiance to Daesh.


and that she was --


...alarmed by the Al Menhali’s Kandoura dress and language. She then made a call to her family and her sister then alerted the police. Moments later, her father also called the police.


She freaked out because of what he was wearing and he wasn't speaking English. Do you really think this guy pledged his allegiance to Daesh and then just stood around talking on the phone? She didn't even go to her supervisor. She basically just started gossiping to outsiders while on the job and it backfired big time.

In the case of the San Bernardino terrorists, they saw suspicious activity, and were too worried about appearances to do something about it.

Two sides of the same coin. It was all about appearances; the former went to one extreme, the latter went to the other extreme.

As for the officers, just more of the same old same old -- bust heads first and ask questions later.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:38 AM
link   
It's terrible what happened to that gentleman.

But.

In view of tensions running high right now, globally, I think it would be common courtesy to avoid frightening people.
Americans need time to acclimate to that type of dress, and we haven't yet. [ But even I have come to associate the white linens with wealth, and not thugery. )

Politeness is the least they can do. Don't scare people by dressing in this way associated with terrorists, don't pray loudly on airplanes in Arabic. Simple things they can do out of courtesy. Make an effort to not frighten people. It's really NOT too much to ask.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Kester

I live in Ohio..

The cop with the body camera is too snarky for me. I bet his inner bicep tattoo says something pretentious.

Anyway, I feel bad for this guy.

The hotel clerk was "nervous". I get why this might make someone nervous but come on..
especially at a hotel..where lots of different people come to stay.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:47 AM
link   
a reply to: angeldoll

In view of tensions running high right now, globally, I think it would be common courtesy to avoid frightening people.


Basically, so much for general freedom and freedom of expression in America if you're from the Middle East lest some fear riddled dumba# Americans disturb your daily life?

In other words, don't speak one's native language in public (if Middle Eastern) or dress as one would always dress (if traditionally) to avoid scaring people even though it's....natural for you. And you're in...America.

Got it. So much for freedom.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:50 AM
link   
a reply to: Boadicea

Either way you could claim both happened.

The neighbors said people were acting suspiciously. So they made a judgment off of actions, but they did not call because they did not want to seem racist. So they let their judgment by appearance override their judgment by action.

In this case, the man was talking in Arabic on a cell phone outside a motel. They made a judgment based on the action. And they also made it based on appearance.

I guess my point is that it's easy to simply blame prejudice that someone looks different, but in the first cases I cited, it was the urge to avoid the same that led them to not report.

Again, you can't win either way. Maybe, if we were less concerned about how someone looks and less judgmental of people who seemed to take that into account, we wouldn't miss some people who were clearly doing things they shouldn't have been.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: angeldoll

In view of tensions running high right now, globally, I think it would be common courtesy to avoid frightening people.


Basically, so much for general freedom and freedom of expression in America if you're from the Middle East lest some fear riddled dumba# Americans disturb your daily life?

In other words, don't speak one's native language in public (if Middle Eastern) or dress as one would always dress (if traditionally) to avoid scaring people even though it's....natural for you. And you're in...America.

Got it. So much for freedom.


You read more into my comment than is there. What I suggest is common courtesy. People are free to not be RUDE.
Frightening people in uncertain times is rude.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 08:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: BoadiceaShe freaked out because of what he was wearing and he wasn't speaking English. Do you really think this guy pledged his allegiance to Daesh and then just stood around talking on the phone? She didn't even go to her supervisor. She basically just started gossiping to outsiders while on the job and it backfired big time.


No more Land of the Free, Home of the Brave. Now it's Land of the Ignorant, Home of the Fearful.

During the first Gulf War, a good friend was out jogging. Trouble was, his skin was a darker shade, from his Mexican heritage. A pick up truck pulled up along side, with young white men cursing at him and calling him "rag head". Lot of hate. That was 25 years ago. Enough time since then to breed more hate, ignorance, and fear. Maybe Americans will always be ignorant and allow themselves to hate and be scared of something.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 09:00 AM
link   
a reply to: Kester

If fat, balding, smoking, drunk Americans were killing people all over the world, then I would not be surprised if I was being profiled.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 09:02 AM
link   
a reply to: angeldoll

I read what you wrote.

It's not about courtesy. If they were trying to intentionally frighten people, then yes it would be rude.

What's discourteous is expecting one group of people to change because other people are too damned ignorant and afraid of their own shadows.




top topics



 
5
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join