It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Odd Sonic Booms - Edwards AFB

page: 1
6
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 12:56 PM
link   
Not sure where else to put this on . . . so I will put it here.

I grew up near Edwards AFB in California, and have heard sonic booms my entire life. But I just heard a set that I Cannot explain.

At about 10.30 AM I heard the following . . . one sonic boom, followed about 5 seconds later by a group of 3 distinct and closely-timed sonic booms (Boom Boom Boom in no more than a one-second span of time). Then about 45 seconds later, another group of 3 closely-set sonic booms. The second set of 3 was about half the decibels as the first set, but definitely an independent event.

There was an intermittent very-high altitude (apparent) vapor trail moving roughly north northwest. But vapor and EAFB go hand in hand.

Anyone else in the Edwards / China Lake area hear that?

I understand re-entry can cause the cluster of 3, but I've hear the shuttle re-enter plenty of times, and it did not sound like this.

So, what could cause this you think?

I will be on the road for the next 8 hours and won't be able to answer any questions. But that's basically all the information I have.




posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:05 PM
link   
Perhaps testing the ability of one aircraft to control a wing of other robotic craft so when boss hits to go mach 2 the others will do so. The delays could be due to allow enough separation between the craft for safety as if you're all within 20 ft of each other any problems could be rather nasty especially for the human test pilot.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:11 PM
link   
a reply to: SecretGoldfish

Edwards is an alternate site for the x-37b.


Under the Boeing plan, a former KSC space shuttle facility known as Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF-1) was converted into a structure that will enable the Air Force "to efficiently land, recover, refurbish and relaunch the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV)," according to Boeing.

Work has been ongoing to get KSC ready as a landing site for the X-37B, but Vandenberg is still being maintained as a landing location, with Edwards Air Force Base in California serving as a backup site, Air Force officials have said.

Source

So maybe that? Or possibly even just a wing of them going super all together? Maybe it's the AI jets being pushed to the limits?
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:17 PM
link   
a reply to: thesungod

The X-37 has only been up for a year. It's not scheduled to return to earth until possibly later this year, or into next year. This was probably several aircraft flying together, with a slight delay between one going supersonic and the others following. Any chase aircraft would be slightly behind the test article in going supersonic, so there would be a slight delay.
edit on 6/30/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:21 PM
link   

I understand re-entry can cause the cluster of 3, but I've hear the shuttle re-enter plenty of times, and it did not sound like this.

So, what could cause this you think?

You're right, the shuttle used to decelerate through mach barriers slower than that. Could be practice bombing, if it was a staccato boom, boom, boom.

Lots of little villages out there need democracy still...



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:21 PM
link   
Edwards AFB nee:Muroc is also the sight of "First Contact" so even if it were something odd or peculiar You'd never get the real story.. Another one of those things that just makes You go "hmm" ... I was going to type "don't lose any sleep over it" then thought what happens if the loud boom happens when trying to snooze?

www.inquisitr.com... iens/

www.ufocasebook.com...

namaste



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:36 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Agreed, as I said in my post "maybe just a wing all going super at once."

I'm a land based missile and rocket guy, not an aircraft guy. That's why you are a fsme of aircraft and I am not.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:37 PM
link   
Sonic booms near an Air Force Base? Who would have thought?



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 01:39 PM
link   
The F-35 is the most visible aircraft testing at Edwards, but there's actually quite a bit of testing that happens there. Updates to existing programs, NASA programs, tanker programs all work out of Edwards.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:34 PM
link   
a reply to: SecretGoldfish

Maybe testing supersonic drones?

I'm going with the idea that it is multiple aircraft, though, just causing the booms in close time proximity.

As an aside, I have very fond memories of twice going to Edwards...once for an air show, I believe, and another to watch the space shuttle land back in the late 80s or early 90s. It was hot.


edit on 30-6-2016 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:03 PM
link   
a reply to: SlapMonkey

Done them both at edwards and share the same very fond memories



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:11 PM
link   
a reply to: schuyler

Actually it's quite rare in most areas. The military is not exempt from the FAA rules on supersonic flight over land areas, with the exception of very specific areas set up for it.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 04:24 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: schuyler

Actually it's quite rare in most areas. The military is not exempt from the FAA rules on supersonic flight over land areas, with the exception of very specific areas set up for it.


That's not quite true. The regulation FAR Sec 91.817 by its explicit terms applies only to "civil" aircraft. No Federal Aviation Regulation applies to military aircraft, although the military has its own set of regs that pretty much mirrors the FARs, at least Part 91. See, www.gleim.com...
As examples of what I'm saying, not very many military pilots have FAA Pilot Certificates issued under Part 61 nor do they have Type Certificates or LOAs for the aircraft they fly and almost no military aircraft are Type Certificated under Parts 23 or 25.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 04:27 PM
link   
a reply to: F4guy

They're not technically under the FARs, but they still tend to follow them as much as possible. It makes things easier if they do.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 05:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: F4guy

They're not technically under the FARs, but they still tend to follow them as much as possible. It makes things easier if they do.


The Air Force Regulations (or Instructions, as many are called) sometimes mirror the FARs, but we commonly did stuff that would cost my certificate now. For instance, when picking up new F-4 from St Louis, the standard departure was to rotate, lift off, accelerate, gear up and wing stuff clean and go vertical to 8,000 feet. I can name 6 different FARs that violates. Every air-to-air refueling violates 3 different FARs. The AF Regs most closely mirror the FARs in the area of Air Traffic Control procedures, although civil airspace ends at 60,000 feet. None of Parts 61, 23, 25, 121, 135 and 141 are mirrored at all. And since the sonic boom regulation prohibits even taking off in a supersonic capable (defined as having an MMo over 1.0, it is obviously ignored. I suspect I broke a bunch of windows and cracked some cielings in my day.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 07:08 PM
link   
Neat to hear those booms, once you get used to them.

Are they still working on quiet sonic booms out there?

Any dynamiting going on at gold mine/quarries in the area?



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 07:09 PM
link   
a reply to: desert

They've selected the designs, but they haven't flown them yet other than scale models.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 08:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: desert

They've selected the designs, but they haven't flown them yet other than scale models.


Yeah uh huh.....

edit on 30-6-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 06:45 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Well, someone is flying some sort of craft very high, and very, very fast, as I have personally observed it in daylight hours. Directly overhead and no noise whatsoever. Horizon to horizon, clear blue sky. This was at least a twin engined craft.
Now, my question is, does height have any effect on sonic boom heard at ground level ?
Can a craft, say flying at 80000-100000ft, flying supersonic/hypersonic be heard at ground level ?
I believe the shuttle could be heard leaving sonic booms on re-entry.



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 07:26 AM
link   
a reply to: nelloh62

Some cant




top topics



 
6
<<   2 >>

log in

join