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The myth of millennial entitlement was created to hide their parents’ mistakes

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posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I find it ironic that Millennials would blame their parents for their failures.

That is exactly the kind of response that would be expected from a group of young people that have not learned to take responsibility for themselves and forge their own future.




posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Thats why I placed blame on both, 90-10 mostly on the parents as being failures as a role model. The kids don;t magically know how to be productive and hard working members of society. They have to be taught. But they are free thinking people who have the capacity to grow beyond what they were as children, if mom and dad sucked, here is an idea... don't be like them.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

"Things are bad for everyone stop blaming each other and take ownership and let's create change."

I sure agree with this, and I think a vast majority of people around the World "instinctively" know that taking back ownership of our own lives and Countries is the change we need......the problem of course is a unified populace that isn't fighting among themselves being willing to "fight" our common enemy. I will call the enemy the "elite globalists" , but really I think many of them are Satanists.

From my perspective at 52 yrs. old, our kids have been raised on tv and technology geared to brainwash people and the kids are the most susceptible. Generation X might have been the last generation that really had a fighting chance to develop their physical and cognitive life skills without being completely submerged in the "Matrix".

If I'm lucky enough to be a Grandma someday I will use any time I have with them to teach them practical life skills and to enjoy Nature...lol.....no cell phones or sitting in front of a screen allowed at Grandma's !



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

There are several contributing factors to this:

1) First, most people are dumb as a box of rocks and their opinions aren't worth anything. You can usually spot these kinds of people straight off. For example: they only really have one source for their opinions, or they might even loudly insist -- as if to remind themselves, I guess -- that they are "entitled to their opinions!" Both can be safely disregarded.

2) Most people have zero clue what a millennial actually is. They use the word interchangeably to mean "anyone younger than me," or even kids who are graduating from high-school this year.

3) Memeifiers: These are the morons in their own little reality bubbles, shared by pretty much everyone else within their social circle. If they see a story once, it barely registers, but if some tool in their box starts spreading it around on Facebook, or whatever, they instantly and completely believe that it's both TRUE and UNIVERSAL. Memeification is actually a well known form of intellectual retardation that upwards of 30% of all living humans are afflicted by in 2016. Which would be super sad if they weren't also the most common group to become a Darwin award statistic, which makes it hilarious whenever they talk.

4) Finally, you have the true guilty parties: the ones who should probably know better, but are so busy shoring up the legacy of their own brand identity / "generation" that they don't care who or what else they smear in the process. You can always spot these characters as well. They are the one's who start sentences with "Back in my day..." or post the obligatory "You had an awesome childhood IF..." garbage every time the Viagra fails to kick in on schedule.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:28 PM
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We can trace this back for generations. Starting with our great great grandparents(for the Gen-X kids) in allowing the federal reserve act to be solidified into law in the early 1900's. The silent generation had a small hand but they were occupied with fighting Nazi's. The baby boomers did in fact cause the most damage. I can't figure out if they realize the actions of the Clinton and Bush administrations were literally designed to suck the remaining wealth out of the carcass that was capitalism. Either way they dropped the ball big time.

We now have this crone capitalism plutocracy where the companies and government control the majority of the power and wealth of the working class. I have noticed that most millennials have a very weak grasp on the systems of governance that is in place. I do believe this is by design. A government that educates it's people will do so for it's own benefit. The norm seems to be "Don't question authority" and "Capitalism is bad".

I guess what I'm getting at is you can't entirely blame one generation or the other. We all had a hand in the slow decline and degradation of the principles that this country was founded on.

The most important question is there still time to do a 180 and fix these things?
Or has the house of cards become to complex to be fixed?



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

But what this article doesn't discuss is that many of the things championed by the loudest voices of that generation focus on political correctness and social safety nets, all the while ignoring or refusing to discuss or accept the unintentional consequences that such things create in their wake.

I agree that we sub-40-year-olds are not well represented in this election (although I argue that Gary Johnson represents me about 90% of the time), but there is a case to be made when comparing our current college-aged and late-20s/early-30s people's mindset on how to deal with political and social change with the "elders" who currently create cobwebs in our governments (state and federal, for the most part). Sit-ins, demonstrations, violence at political rallies, picket signs, anti-war rallies, social-justice wars, and general disrespect for authority are all mirrored in the happenings of the late-50s through the 60s.

The thing is, though, is that the baby boomers running the nation now had some relatively respectful issues for which they were fighting, and they had real substance to them. Nowadays, the Millennials pick on people just because we have dissenting views (all the while screaming for more tolerance), and choose things for which to fight that have a good face value, but lack deeper substance (often...not every issue).

I was born in 1979, so I'm right on that fence line of the changing of the guard for generations, but I definitely reflect the ideas of and relate to the Gen-Xers more than the Yers (Millennials).

But I'll tell you, I truly feel that the biggest change that dictated how Millennials would view the world came with the policies and procedures of a post-9/11 America, where we really lost our way as a nation concerning individual freedoms and prosperity.

I don't only blame Millennials for their plight in the job market, or housing issues (it's okay to have roommates), or myriad other things that have shaped their views, but what I can't avoid is the overall lack of personal responsibility that many (including the loudest mouthpieces of the generation) seem to embrace. Maybe that's a parenting thing, and maybe it's not, but the fact is that it exists in many from this generation, and until that gets fixed (and I believe that it will as they/we age and mature), this stigma will continue to exist because it's a conveniently found reality in many from that generation.

It's not all the media's fault. The change must come from within, and just like when you mentioned leadership to someone else, that leadership must originate from with in as well.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey

originally posted by: whyamIhere
America will bounce back.

We always have and we always will.

Too bad the very young cannot remember being proud American's.

America will rise again. We just need a leader...


I wonder how many Romans said this circa 470 C.E.


Heck with the Romams, watch out for the South.

A Terror attack on Graceland ? Think of the line of Bass Boats.

Headed out "Oh no they didn't" or "Not the King".

Your point is well taken though...



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

So it's millennials fault that the economy started going down the drain as they entered the work force? Because I'd say the economy tanking had nothing to do with us and our anger is only directed at the fact that we have been left with barely anything.

Millennials work longer hours for less money compared to the generations that came before us. How is that our fault? In fact we are working FOR those earlier generations by and large.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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While it is all well and good to think you can shift the blame for your own bad actions onto someone else, the fact is that if you can make a cogent argument citing said bad actions, then it says that you are capable of recognizing them for what they are.

In other words, if you can point out that murder is murder and wrong, then you it is pretty good proof that you know the difference between right and wrong well enough to recognize that you understand murder to be wrong.

In this case, if you understand that millennials are entitled brats, it highlights that you recognize that flaw so you know the difference between being an entitled brat and not being one.

Therefore, if you can recognize the problem, you can likewise take steps to avoid being part of it. That means you need to shoulder at least part of blame. You know the problem and persist in being part of it by blaming others for it instead of taking steps to correct the issue in yourself.

There would be better evidence for your complete innocence if you were entirely oblivious to anything you might be doing to make yourself the poster child for entitled spoiled brat.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko


In this case, if you understand that millennials are entitled brats, it highlights that you recognize that flaw so you know the difference between being an entitled brat and not being one.

IF.......millennials are entitled brats. And that is what is up for discussion here, not THAT they are entitled brats. We can understand them to be but our understanding may be limited. If one recognizes something as you say, it presupposes that the recognizer holds a concept OF entitled brats and that some may BE entitled brats. But to color a whole generation with the paint just because one HAS that concept already in their mind is stereotyping a silly old brain fart that equates the actions and supposed reasons for those actions of a few, upon a larger group.

But more to your second sentence, 'so you know the difference'. Maybe not. It is much easier to hold up our preconceived notions and think we see the difference in others while at the same time NOT see it in ourselves. This extends far beyond seeing 'entitled brats' and into the much larger thought of the mote in another s eye and the log within our own.


edit on 30America/ChicagoThu, 30 Jun 2016 15:05:31 -0500Thu, 30 Jun 2016 15:05:31 -050016062016-06-30T15:05:31-05:00300000005 by TerryMcGuire because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: JAY1980

Your absolutely right JAY, there's plenty of "blame" to go around and each and every one of us needs to take stock in how we did or didn't do the right thing, especially if we have or are raising children. I do think think we can fix things in our own houses and families and that's where it needs to start.

I have to disagree with Ozzy, there is a lot of value in looking at life from a historical perceptive, unfortunately for my generation Y child there are many things I didn't understand while she was growing up. Millennial's are still minors, so we don't really know yet how they will do in the work force yet.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire

I am talking about the person in question.

For the sake of argument, let's assume I am a millennial. If I am able to realize that millennials in general can be spoiled brats with entitlement mentalities, then I both know what that problem is and what it looks like in terms of behavior and attitude when I see it. It also means I am capable of recognizing it as a less than desirable state of being and thus wrong.

If I, as an individual, can recognize these things, it means I have knowledge of them personally and should therefore be able to recognize their attributes even in my own glorious person. If I persist in blaming others rather than seeking to recognize and root out those traits in myself, then I am merely shunting aside the responsibility.

It isn't that I am simply ignorant and have no blame. I am cognizant of what the problem is and refuse to take any responsibility of my own for my own behavior, preferring to lay all the blame on others instead of understanding that I control me.
edit on 30-6-2016 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

As you clarify the position, I agree entirely. We as individuals can accept ourselves as just a part of whatever group we find ourselves in and act to the general stereotypes of that group or we can dis-associate from those general and non productive tendencies and cut our own course.

And for me, this holds true in the case at hand. This young person very likely has some glimmering of these stereo-types of her generation and very easily might have been operating under the premise you and I agree upon. From the article, I find reason to think that she had not. She went to an on line advice councilor and from there it seems the scenario got picked up and used by others to promote their own agenda biases.

What I do not agree with though is the generational bashing that is handed out upon individuals do only in part to actions that seem to others to fit a preconceived notion of all people of that generation.

I agree with you completely on individual responsibility. As member OneQuestion has been going on about recently we have to own our endeavors, our strengths and our shortcomings. And for me, this responsibility cuts the other way too. That we should not blame the individual because it seems to be accordance with our established views of a group they are perceived to be in.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 05:28 PM
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Let's concern only white america with this issue at hand. other groups have their own trendlines

This actually started in the 1960's with the hippies and the new 3rd world immigration laws.
Welfarism expanded widely in the 1960's
Religion as a civic institution fell apart, parental involvement in school fell apart.
White flight and property segregation. As people segregated themselves according to property instead of co-mingling values started fall apart in inner cities, and diverge in rural areas.
wedlock births skyrocketed, marriage as a bedrock of society was attacked. fatherless homes trend highly with very bad outcomes for the children.
Bad trade deals.
USA default on bretton woods 1971
immigration depressed wages, diluted the native culture and civic institutions. These different cultures often lack in the level of positive outcomes relative to white majority culture.
higher classes used zoning to corral lower classes into certain areas. Keeps their nest egg high value enforcing ridiculous zoning laws for a population that has grown 125 million since that time(over 50% increase)
Education standards lowering
millenials hearing "go to college" propaganda since they were born. The majority 40-80k in debt and a piece of paper, grats
unsustainable pension systems, many rely on wall street for their value

Millenials didn't do these things, and they are about to be stopped in their tracks. Since the donald, some sort of pendulum has swung back hard. Some sort of nationalistic, pro-US culture, US citizen First. Turns out there were people out there who want to save western culture.
The parties are quickly going back to the old right(nationalist) vs old left(internationalist). traditional(native) values vs cultural marxism(multiculturalism)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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I have nothing against millennials as a group. Hard to lump them all together and that would be foolish anyway. I do take issue with all the whiners. Social media in all its forms has exposed great numbers of millennials that just whine and whine.

They arent growing up during a depression, recession, world war, stock market disaster etc. Why all the whining?

Why do you think blowing up social media to btch and complain all the time is ever going to get you anywhere?

Blaming the parents is just deflection from personal responsibility and trying to camouflage the weak character some of these people possess.



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: 0zzymand0s

Point (2) Wait, kids graduating high-school this year aren't millennials? I graduated last year and I've been calling myself a millennial. Did I make the cut?
edit on 1/7/2016 by Eilasvaleleyn because: Reasons



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: In4ormant

In regards to the whiners, I've met more people who whine about the whiners than people who actually whine. I wonder what that says.

We might not officially be in a depression right now, but holy hell is it heading towards one, and holy hell it is close. Also, what do you mean "not growing up in a stock market disaster?" What do you call 2008?

I'm glad I avoided all the huge wars, but instead I have been greeted by terrorism and 9/11. The people of 1942 had to fight foreign governments. The people of 2010 have to fight their own.
edit on 1/7/2016 by Eilasvaleleyn because: Reasons



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: Eilasvaleleyn
a reply to: 0zzymand0s

Point (2) Wait, kids graduating high-school this year aren't millennials? I graduated last year and I've been calling myself a millennial. Did I make the cut?


Millennials were born after 2000...so the oldest ones are 16.....
You would be Generation Y .....



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: MountainLaurel

~~Google's saying it's the ones reaching young adulthood around 2000. God, all these weird interpretation. That would make me a post-millennial, then. ~~

Edit: Right, from what I can tell, Gen Y and Millennial are relatively interchangeable. Gen Y is 1980-1999, which would put me right at the tail end of Gen Y as I was born in 1997.
edit on 1/7/2016 by Eilasvaleleyn because: Reasons



posted on Jul, 1 2016 @ 11:33 AM
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originally posted by: Eilasvaleleyn
a reply to: MountainLaurel

~~Google's saying it's the ones reaching young adulthood around 2000. God, all these weird interpretation. That would make me a post-millennial, then. ~~

Edit: Right, from what I can tell, Gen Y and Millennial are relatively interchangeable. Gen Y is 1980-1999, which would put me right at the tail end of Gen Y as I was born in 1997.


Yeah, it is kinda confusing, and for sure the "Gen's" overlap and shared experiences will really define what "Gen" we associate with. The majority of your life has been after 2000, so you have way more in common with the Millennial then Gen Y's born in the 80's.

It's funny, I just had to look up Gen X to make sure that was actually what my "Gen" was ! LOL....it really does show how fast technology has grown and what a difference even 10 yrs can make. In another thread another ATS member said something really funny....them probably being on the tail end of Gen X, closer to Gen Y probably, and me at the beginning, it made me laugh, but also made me think.......they said....."if you were smoking in the boy's room and "toking" under the bleachers....."ya'll don't ball" ! " I had to look up that song, and it certainly made it clear that there was a difference in "shared experiences" between members of what is defined as Gen X....I'll post the article I read, kinda interesting if you want a little more insight on your folks.

www.jenx67.com...

I think it's awesome that someone of your age is a member of ATS, and you know kids today are SMART, no doubt about that.....IDK...you tell me, your the Future.....is my desire to preserve life before technology a nostalgic dream or something that our youth value and want us to fight for ?


edit on 1-7-2016 by MountainLaurel because: (no reason given)



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