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Five Ways Parents Can Help Prevent Teen Depression

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posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:22 PM
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From:
CLN: Conscious Life News
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By Jill Suttie
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27 June 2016

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consciouslifenews.com...
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Parents are understandably worried about their teens. Last year’s spate of teen suicides in Palo Alto, coupled with high rates of teen depression, make parents wonder what they could be doing to better help their kids navigate the sometimes-treacherous waters of their adolescent years.
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Fortunately, scientists who study teen depression have some preliminary advice. By looking at new findings in neuroscience, as well as other psychological research and longitudinal data, scientists are zeroing in on a better understanding of what impacts teen depression and how to prevent it. Here are some of the suggestions coming out of the science.
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1. Provide continual warmth, caring, and support
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. . .
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In one 2016 study of a large group of teenagers from diverse ethnic backgrounds, results showed that teens with high levels of parental support had lower depression symptoms and lower cortisol and C-reactive protein levels—two physiological markers associated with depression—than teens with less supportive relationships. Interestingly, peer support levels did not change these markers, suggesting that parental support may be key.
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. . .
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So what does positive parental support actually look like? According to developmental neuroscientist Ron Dahl, the best way to help guide your teens is to provide appropriate supports without discounting their emotional lives. He suggests showing empathy, asking open-ended rather than pointed questions, seeking to understand rather than correct, being gentle when your teen’s words and actions don’t match, and showing support for their growing autonomy. A combination of warmth and appropriate limits, as well as looking for the positive in your child, is the best way to help them avoid depression.
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2. Teach and model strong social and emotional skills
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3. Encourage positive peer relationships
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4. Encourage teens to seek purpose in life
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5. Work to change the school environment
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I think this is a useful article.
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There's a fair amount of research mentioned for the items listed.
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I believe that earnest application of the suggestions could make a marked difference in a teen's life. They might even save them from a successful suicide attempt.
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The article is certainly, imho, worth the time to read it and ponder it.
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I think it is particularly important for parents to avoid underestimating their impact.
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HOWEVER, AUTHORITARIAN, INSENSITIVE attempts to manipulate, coerce, demand etc. with a teen are likely to backfire.
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Treat the teen as a beloved friend if you can't imagine any other way to tune in with an open empathetic heart and lack of judgmentalism.
It is crucial to make your attentiveness and healthy affections genuine and freely expressed without strings attached.
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Make your relationship and your inputs ATTRACTIVE to the teen without pandering to their worst features and qualities. Be yourself. No need to compromise your priority values. But major in majors and minor in minors.
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The biggest major is to connect heart to heart with your teen in a way that is attractive to the teen and that adds to their sense of worth.

Cheers.




posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:25 PM
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Buying them a car works wonders.

When a brake line starts leaking the depression comes back. Fixing it right away solves the problem.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I wonder how much them earning part of the car would help. I think we appreciate more the things we work harder for.

And, their level of responsibility is also important. some 18 year old's I wouldn't want near a vehicle on my insurance! LOL.

Other 16 year old's with car keys would not cause me to lose any sleep at all.

We know that teens brains are not fully developed. Some parts not until about age 35.

And one of their tendencies is to exaggerate the importance of a lot of things. Which, in a way, fixing a brake line is.

HOWEVER, have the teen there with you, talking to you while you fix the brake line. Seriously. I'd make that a high priority.


And when serious RAD is present . . . their emotional expression and relationship management is also blunted by the related brain damage. That can complicate depression related issues considerably.

I think the most reliable thing is to tangibly heart to heart LOVE THEM AND LOVE THEM SOME MORE. That means GIVE THEM YOURSELF far more than cars any THING else.


edit on 28/6/2016 by BO XIAN because: added



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

My granddaughter likes to work on cars, We put new brakes on it and she is learning how to use my scanners to diagnose things. She isn't afraid of getting dirty. She drives her kids honda three wheeler yet, she is only five foot two so she still fits in it at seventeen.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:45 PM
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I'm the tail end of the Boomers. I had a Mom at home for lunch. She eventually had to go to work but I was an adult by then. The three younger ones had to deal with that. ONE RULE. Take the time to see what's going on in your kids lives. Talk to them. That's all it really takes. I'm a father of 3 adult kids. AND ONE AMAZING GRANDSON!!!!!
It's not that hard but it can be fatiguing. Suck it up buttercup.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 11:50 PM
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ABSOLUTELY INDEED. Bears repeating with emphases:


originally posted by: intrepid
I'm the tail end of the Boomers. I had a Mom at home for lunch. She eventually had to go to work but I was an adult by then. The three younger ones had to deal with that.

ONE RULE. Take the time to see what's going on in your kids lives. Talk to them. That's all it really takes. I'm a father of 3 adult kids. AND ONE AMAZING GRANDSON!!!!!
It's not that hard but it can be fatiguing. Suck it up buttercup
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GREAT INPUT. THANKS.

And . . . even 15-30 minutes focused intently on the teen can make a significant difference.

Putting it off for something stupid on TV is realllly dumb, imho.

And, often, car rides are a great way to chat. I think I'd insist on no cell phones on such a ride--for either one of you.

But just tuning in, genuine interest and focus on the teen and drawing the teen out without judging them . . . can be priceless.




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