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Maverick scientist thinks he has discovered a magnetic sixth sense in humans

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posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: skywatcher44

This is pretty important if true.

It could have implications on earthquakes and the related magnetic field changes. People often report feeling dizzy and off balance right before an earthquake, and we know earthquake lights are caused by electric discharge, which whenever you have electric charge moving, there are magnetic effects. Animals can sense it too, all different kinds so maybe there is a connection that can be finer tuned.

Food for thought, nice find OP.

~ Namaste




posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 10:42 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
After a moment, he could always point north. I mean always.


Yeah, my big little brother can do that. It's his super power. He can also tell where he is. That sounds simple, but it's not. You let him get a one good look at a topo map, stick him somewhere in there, and he can tell you to within a gnat's ass where he is at.

He used to be highly prized as a cav scout. He'd end up in the lead doing on the fly nav in the dark without the map.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 12:37 AM
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I read 'maverick ", i read' scientist ' and" sixth sense, humans" and i thought ....

Maybe i shouldn't click on this....




posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 08:28 AM
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originally posted by: VivreLibre
I don't understand

Is this that thing where you can feel someone looking at the back of your head?

Thats different. Ever thought of someone and they call on the phone? Thats more 'para'normal, this is more physical.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam


He used to be highly prized as a cav scout. He'd end up in the lead doing on the fly nav in the dark without the map.

Thats more by training and experience. Scouts of old didn't have topo maps or compasses. Even at night they can still read the stars, wind direction, follow game trails, elevation, terrain, waterways, etc.

But yah, that other ability, weird. One time me and my friend were lost in Fresno residential area, we had no idea how to get out of there, back to the freeway. Once he told me which direction was north, we just headed in the direction of the freeway until we hit it.

Human GPS.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Bedlam


He used to be highly prized as a cav scout. He'd end up in the lead doing on the fly nav in the dark without the map.

Thats more by training and experience.



I've never seen anyone else who could do it like Todd. You have to see him in action. Captains wept when he ets'd.


Someone had to get the talent I suppose, it certainly wasn't me. I drive Todd to distraction not being able to land nav without a compass.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

He is reading signs he is experienced with. The suns location, height, shadow direction and length, prevailing winds, all in a heartbeat.

I remember during my outdoor phase being able to tell time and direction, it becomes second nature. How much time does he spend outdoors vs. inside. He's an outdoor freak, am I right?



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 08:55 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Bedlam

He is reading signs he is experienced with. The suns location, height, shadow direction and length, prevailing winds, all in a heartbeat.

I remember during my outdoor phase being able to tell time and direction, it becomes second nature. How much time does he spend outdoors vs. inside. He's an outdoor freak, am I right?


We all are. But yeah, you don't want to be a deer or a fish around him.


However, he doesn't need to be in a place he's familiar with, either.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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Fascinating thread, great subject. I look forward to reading & hearing more about this. I'm all for the idea that we have as-yet undetermined senses, and I believe myself to possess at least one - being able to feel the drop in atmospheric pressure before a particularly bad rain storm arrives, even if it's not apparent from looking at the clouds, for example.




posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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Just to add.. I subscribe to a great IMO you tube weather Channel that focuses mainly on the sun.. Suspicious observers..
Todays 29/6 contribution mentions this researched magnetism and I thought it ok to post..




posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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Humans have magnetite (ferrous oxide) within the ethmoid bone of the nose, this is a well known magnetic receptor - i'm pretty sure it also has neurons projecting from it as well.

Also, The brain is constantly emitting electromagnetic waves (detected by electroencephalograms [EEGs]), it'd be naive to think it is not also receiving electromagnetic waves.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 09:15 PM
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I've got a pretty strong sense of direction, so I wouldn't rule this out. Also I notice there is a spot at the top of the nose where it forms a T with the brow ridge can sort of feel "movement" when a strong magnet is near it. (Weak feeling of pressure that can change direction.) I think some people are able to develop or use this sense more strongly than others, not sure if that's genetic or learning though.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 11:40 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Also, The brain is constantly emitting electromagnetic waves (detected by electroencephalograms [EEGs]), it'd be naive to think it is not also receiving electromagnetic waves.


Actually, it's NOT emitting electromagnetic waves. EEGs detect very low level electric fields, but that is not the same as emitting a propagating radio wave.

And in general, things that emit waves are not therefore also great at receiving them.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 06:38 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

Actually, it's NOT emitting electromagnetic waves. EEGs detect very low level electric fields, but that is not the same as emitting a propagating radio wave.


electric fields are electromagnetic fields. All electric fields are always accompanied by a magnetic field - hence electromagnetic waves. The EEG detects this with electrodes placed along the scalp. If there were no electromagnetic waves being emitted, this would not work. Again, "electric fields" are always accompanied by magnetic fields - this is the basis of an electromagnetic wave.



And in general, things that emit waves are not therefore also great at receiving them.


They actually tore down the wardenclyffe tower (Tesla's Tower) because they thought that it could be used by the enemy to spy on the USA during WWII, despite it being intended as a electromagnetic energy source. That device, and all other tesla coils, are the most similar man-made device to the human nervous system, but that warrants another thread of its own.
edit on 30-6-2016 by cooperton because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-6-2016 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: cooperton

originally posted by: Bedlam

Actually, it's NOT emitting electromagnetic waves. EEGs detect very low level electric fields, but that is not the same as emitting a propagating radio wave.


electric fields are electromagnetic fields. All electric fields are always accompanied by a magnetic field - hence electromagnetic waves.



Quite incorrect. You can certainly have electric and magnetic fields that do not propagate as radio waves. This is a great example.



The EEG detects this with electrodes placed along the scalp. If there were no electromagnetic waves being emitted, this would not work. Again, "electric fields" are always accompanied by magnetic fields - this is the basis of an electromagnetic wave.


The EEG detects potential differences. It does not detect EM waves. It uses an instrumentation op-amp. The circuitry is pretty straightforward. If you like, I could design you one.




They actually tore down the wardenclyffe tower (Tesla's Tower) because they thought that it could be used by the enemy to spy on the USA during WWII, despite it being intended as a electromagnetic energy source. That device, and all other tesla coils, are the most similar man-made device to the human nervous system, but that warrants another thread of its own.


They tore it down because Tesla couldn't pay his bills, and went bankrupt. The court sold off the equipment to recover some of the estate's monetary assets.
edit on 30-6-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: cooperton

Something to consider...the average 'brain wave' is about 10Hz.


What's the wavelength of a 10Hz EM wave? Is it possible to emit a wave of that length from the thickness of a neuron's membrane?

Didn't think so.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

Quite incorrect. You can certainly have electric and magnetic fields that do not propagate as radio waves. This is a great example.


I never said anything about radio waves. I do not know why you are mentioning this.




The EEG detects potential differences. It does not detect EM waves. It uses an instrumentation op-amp. The circuitry is pretty straightforward. If you like, I could design you one. Something to consider...the average 'brain wave' is about 10Hz.


What's the wavelength of a 10Hz EM wave? Is it possible to emit a wave of that length from the thickness of a neuron's membrane?

Didn't think so.


You're misunderstanding what the 10Hz is measuring. That Hz value is not measuring the energetic frequency [i.e. Planck's Equation: E =(h)(frequency)], it is measuring the resonance between two electrodes on the EEG array - it is an arbitrary reference number given to classify various brain rhythms. When two brain regions are synchronized and detected by their respective electrodes, you will have an intelligible trend such as gamma, alpha, theta, beta waves. The Hz value for these Beta/Gamma/Alpha/etc "waves" are not measuring energetic frequency, but relative frequency between the two reference points - Nevertheless, the electromagnetic frequencies measured by the electrodes are based on electromagnetic waves being emitted by the various brain regions. How else but by electromagnetic waves could an external electrode receive such a signal?



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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I've always been able to tell where north is, just by "a feeling", have to shut my eyes though for best results.

There is electric running through our bodies, so perhaps the earth's magnetic field has an effect on this?

It is found in most, if not all creatures on this planet, so why not humans?

Perhaps we have been reliant on technology so long we have simply buried the ability.



posted on Jun, 30 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: woogleuk
I've always been able to tell where north is, just by "a feeling", have to shut my eyes though for best results.

There is electric running through our bodies, so perhaps the earth's magnetic field has an effect on this?

It is found in most, if not all creatures on this planet, so why not humans?

Perhaps we have been reliant on technology so long we have simply buried the ability.


Me too - ever since I was a child - for some reason, when I looked at the sky, I could sense which way was north - especially in the winter. I still can sense it occasionally, but as a child, it was much more powerful. Same thing with the pressure point where the third eye (pineal gland) sits. I would feel pressure and a tingling which sometimes was quite strong.

This paper is quite interesting about the magnetosensitivity of the pineal gland:

Pineal gland "magnetosensitivity" to static magnetic fields is a consequence of induced electric currents (eddy currents).

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

They're both very interesting phenomenon - but for me at least, both have diminished in occurrence and strength as an adult.



posted on Jul, 3 2016 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

I don't think you understand Bedlam's point.

You can have electric fields oscillating, but there is a big difference between oscillating 'near fields' and actual radiation which propagates out in the 'far field'. When electromagneticists talk about 'radiation', they really do mean the second one. The efficiency of transmitting radiation in the true sense with a miniscule antenna the size of a few neurons at 10Hz is negligible.

EEGs are measuring voltages which come from electric fields. These come from large scale aggregations of potentials induced in the axons & cell bodies by active motions of ions through electrochemical means.

What do you mean, specifically, by "relative frequency between two points"?

edit on 3-7-2016 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-7-2016 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



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