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Rise of Border Fences Hampers Wildlife Movements

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posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 07:08 AM
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A recent study by scientists alludes that the recent mass movements of people and the fences erected to stop said people has and will continue to be detrimental to wildlife in Europe and Asia.



Up to 30,000km (18,600 miles) of wire fences and walls have been built, some in response to 2015's refugee crisis.

Researchers say they can divide threatened species such as deer and bear, as well as increase mortality.

The study points out that many of these "temporary" structures may become permanent and have long-term impacts


It might seem pretty obvious that animals don't understand borders, it's something I have never considered. That national security can endanger wildlife especially in landlocked nations.


"We hypothesise that 9/11 was the main driver, when the risk of terrorism and drug dealers coming in meant that governments were closing their borders to reduce the risk while conservationists were driving for a more open system to allow wildlife to cross," said Dr Matt Hayward from Bangor University, UK

"Certainly, there's a lot of high-profile fences that have been put up in recent times driven by the Syrian and refugee crisis."

The study says that between 25,000 and 30,000km of wire fences and walls surround many countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and they are having significant impacts on species.



But it is not all doom & gloom.



However, they also acknowledge there may be times when the construction of fences actually benefits species.

They give the example of the Asiatic Wild Ass, or Khulan, on the Mongolian-Chinese border. A 4,700km fence prevents these animals from wandering into Inner Mongolia where illegal hunting remains a major problem.


Source

The Study




posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990


The study points out that many of these "temporary" structures may become permanent and have long-term impacts

Like roads, for instance? Roadkill is also responsible for wildlife decline.

But thats 'okay'...



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 07:41 AM
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The whole point of fences is to prevent wildlife from crossing.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 08:06 AM
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Those deer and bear can get passports and visas just like the rest of us. They can line up at the gates and get their credentials checked to make sure they are not people in bear suits.

Oh wait, now I gave people a new idea on how to get across the boarder.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Well wouldn't it have to if it is going to be a challenge for people?

This is such a non-issue.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 10:39 AM
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Well we better open our borders I guess?



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: TheBulk

When have our borders been closed?



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

Of course it's a non issue, just like fencing and farming has helped thousands of Asian Elephants die by encrouching onto farm lands.

It's the Elephants fault that they migrate and the usual paths have been blocked over time.

It's basically the same issue, animals migrate. Fences and human settlements disrupt or stop animal migration alltogether. I dare say it is a very big issue for a multitude of species.
edit on 27-6-2016 by RAY1990 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Roads can be crossed, fences not so much. Geographic isolation of animals has rarely been caused by roads if ever. Plenty of cases due to human influence though, war for example. The Korean DMZ area is a good example.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 10:11 PM
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A border fence doesn't have to be continuous. Just the open spaces have to be well surveilled.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 12:03 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Google roadkill... species are being decimated by 'crossing' I mean getting killed crossing... roads.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Driving down US 87 on Sunday between San Angelo and Big Spring we counted 112 deer, 2 turkey vulture, 2 skunks, a fox, a coyote, and maybe 15 "undetermined" animals dead from car impact. Its about 1.5 hours drive.

One time, about 10 years ago on that same drive, we counted over 300 dead deer before we just stopped counting. It takes a few weeks for a dead animal to rot away beyond noticing it. But even with that....its an enormous amount of dead wildlife on a highway that really isn't that incredibly busy when compared to an interstate.



posted on Jun, 28 2016 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

So sad...


They're starting to put crossing bridges over and or tunnels underneath raised hi way beds, where theres lots of roadkill. Its expensive, but the critters are getting it. They been migrating these places for millennia, its in their DNA.

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