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The Jesuit's Symbol links to an 18th Century Grimoire called "The Key of Hell"

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posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 02:04 PM
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This topic was inspired by the following video:

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Just a little background information:

From en.wikipedia.org...



The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu, S.J., SJ or SI) is a male religious congregation of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits. The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations on six continents. Jesuits work in education (founding schools, colleges, universities and seminaries), intellectual research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, and promote social justice and ecumenical dialogue.

Ignatius of Loyola founded the society after being wounded in battle and experiencing a religious conversion. He composed the Spiritual Exercises to help others follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. In 1534, Ignatius and six other young men, including Francis Xavier and Peter Faber, gathered and professed vows of poverty, chastity, and later obedience, including a special vow of obedience to the Pope in matters of mission direction and assignment. Ignatius's plan of the order's organization was approved by Pope Paul III in 1540 by a bull containing the "Formula of the Institute".


I'm sure most of you all are aware of the Jesuit order. Maybe you are also aware that this is the first time in history that we have a Jesuit Pope, Pope Francis.

As we all know, every order has a symbol. This is the Jesuit order's symbol (as it appears today):



There's lots of symbolism going on here. We see the sun and its rays, the cross symbol (in red), as well as 3 swords or possibly what look like nails at the bottom of the picture, also in red.

Why is this important, you ask? Hold on. I'm getting to that.

Next, I want to talk about a recently rediscovered manuscript called the Clavis Inferni (or translated as "The Key of Hell").

Here's some information on it from publicdomainreview.org...



The Clavis Inferni (“The Key of Hell”) by Cyprianus, is a late-18th-century book on black magic. Written in a mixture of Latin, Hebrew, and a cipher alphabet (namely that of Cornelius Agrippa’s Transitus Fluvii or “Passing through the River” from the Third Book of Occult Philosophy written around 1510) the book has remained rather mysterious due to its unknown origin and context. It is said to be a textbook of the Black School at Wittenburg, a supposed school somewhere in Germany where one could learn the dark arts. As for the name of the author, it seems to have become a common name for people practicing magic. Benjamin Breen writes in The Appendix of how the existence throughout history of various magically-inclined Cyprianuses – from “a Dane […] who was so evil that Satan cast him out of hell” to the Greek wizard St. Cyprian of Antioch (who later converted to Christianity) – led to the name becoming a popular pseudonym for “people at the edges of society who were trying to do real black magic”.


So what does an 18th century grimoire have to do with the Jesuit order, you ask?

Here it is:

In this manuscript, the final page contains a very familiar looking symbol. Here is this page:



Some info about this page from resobscura.blogspot.com...



The final page. Note the symbol, which looks strangely like the emblem of the Society of Jesus to me. [Update 5/11] The same Anonymous in the comments section has also contributed a rough translation of this passage: "I truly, from the law of that Majesty, do receive and take the treasure requested by you in the sent proclamation. Go away now most calmly to your place, without murmor [assuming rumore instead of umore] and commotion, and without harm to us and to the circle of other men. In the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, AMEN." Sounds like a spell or prayer to return a summoned being to its place of origin, perhaps.



When looking at the last symbol on the page, one thing becomes immediately apparent: This symbol is strikingly similar to the Jesuit symbol used today!

It has the capitalized IHS
It has the cross which reaches down into the letter H (except this cross has the serpent coiled around it, which is another very esoteric symbol)
It has the 3 objects at the bottom, but hmm....let's look a little more closely. There's something else here. Something the Jesuits have decidedly removed from their modern day symbol.

A heart. With 3 swords (or nails?) piercing it.

Why would the Jesuits decide to take this out of their symbol? And why would a symbol so connected with the Society of Jesus be so similar to a symbol found in a book of black magic?

Also, those of you who know about tarot reading will recognize the symbol of a heart with 3 swords as one of the cards used in tarot reading.

I believe it's called the "3 of Swords":



Some info on this card from www.keen.com...


Oh dear. Are you feeling alone? Abandoned? Betrayed? Have irreconcilable differences divided a once healthy relationship? The Three of Swords is a card that represents your pain. But this is also a card that appears to warn you that you may be inflicting cruelty upon others. Are you prepared to accept a neutral opinion of your contributions to an abusive or volatile situation?

A symbolic red heart floats before us. It is pierced by three swords, two on either side of it making an X as the blades go in at the top and penetrate through the bottom, and one stabbing from the top straight through the center and exiting out the bottom. All of this takes place with a backdrop of a cloudy gray sky; sleet streaks from the clouds with nowhere to land.


So it is safe to assume that the symbol of a floating pierced heart has hidden meaning and has been used in the occult for a very many years. It also can be assumed that it carries a religious context as well, since we see it being used in dealing with the supernatural as well as very much so connected to the Jesuit order (even if not overtly anymore).

What does this mean? Let's discuss.





edit on 26-6-2016 by Privy_Princess because: trying to get pics to post

edit on 26-6-2016 by Privy_Princess because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: Privy_Princess

S&F but just wanting to mark the thread and see what others have to say .



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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A guess but the three swords could represent the Trinity.

Interesting.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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This grimoire includes rites for the summoning and use of the four Archangels (Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, Uriel) as well as their opposite four Demon Kings (Paymon, Maimon, Egyn, Oriens)

Can you elaborate on which rite is found the similarity in symbolism?

I agree that Jesuits are not cleanhand, but lets not condemn them so early. Its not intelligent.
edit on 26-6-2016 by Egoismyname because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 03:12 PM
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originally posted by: Egoismyname
This grimoire includes rites for the summoning and use of the four Archangels (Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, Uriel) as well as their opposite four Demon Kings (Paymon, Maimon, Egyn, Oriens)

Can you elaborate on which rite is found the similarity in symbolism?

I agree that Jesuits are not cleanhand, but lets not condemn them so early. Its not intelligent.


I'm not sure the name of the rite which this page culminates in the ending of, but I can only assume from the rough translation in the original post that it is some type of banishment chant in order to dispell whichever entity that has been previously evoked and bound.

Sort of like saying "goodbye" when you are finished using a quiji board. lol Just on a much larger and more dangerous scale.

It's obviously a prayer of some sort, since it ends with "Amen". Then we see the symbol afterwards. Could it be a sort of amulet or talisman used to keep the entity at bay or from reappearing? I'm not sure. But it's the largest drawing on the page so I'm assuming it has much meaning in the rite.




posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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originally posted by: TheLieWeLive
A guess but the three swords could represent the Trinity.

Interesting.


And I"m sure that's what Jesuits would be taught to say if questioned about it. lol



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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Also, since those three spears remind me vaguely of nails, I did a little bit of searching on that matter. This is what I found:



Of course, it's just a stamp, but it's something to take note of.

And who knew the debate about how many nails were used in the Crucifixion of Jesus was such a hot topic?

From en.wikipedia.org...



Triclavianism is the belief that three nails were used to crucify Jesus Christ. The exact number of Holy Nails has been a matter of theological debate for centuries. Triclavianism was one of the beliefs attributed to Albigenses and Waldensians, who held that three nails were used to crucify Christ and that a Roman soldier pierced him with a spear on the left side. The 19th century Anglican scholar George Stanley Faber claimed that Pope Innocent III declared this to be a heresy and maintained that four nails were used and Jesus was pierced on the right side. This was repeated in historical works such as Sofia Bompiani's A Short History of the Italian Waldenses.[2] Faber's book does not quote any primary source, and does not give the name or date of the document of Innocent III. Other scholarly treatments of the subject, such as Herbert Thurston's article in the 1914 Catholic Encyclopedia, make no mention of any such document.



Faber. That name sounds familiar. I wonder if this George Stanley Faber is at all related to St. Peter Faber, who was just recently canonized by Pope Francis (the Jesuit pope).

Also, this is very interesting, as well:

Someone on Yahoo answers asked how many nails were used during the Crucifixion and got this answer:




The Roman empire used crucifixion as a means of torture and humiliation. The cross-beam was fastened to an upright beam (or even a tree). The nails of crucified victims were regarded as some of the most powerful charms, or amulets, in the ancient world. Ordinary people prized them highly. So immediately after crucified victims were cut down from their crosses, the nails would be removed from their bodies. In Israel in1968 archaeologists found the bones of a man who had been crucified. They found a rusty nail lodged in his ankle bone. This proves that at least one nail would have been used to pin the feet into position. Two nails would have been necessary to pin the arms into position. Some think Jesus' arms were positioned above his head but that would have resulted in very quick asphyxiation - and Jesus survived for 3 hours. So, we have the typical cross-beam to support both arms, and the feet against the upright.



So, since the Jesuits are the Society of Jesus, could these stakes represent the 3 (or more?) nails that were used during the Crucifixion?

edit on 26-6-2016 by Privy_Princess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: Privy_Princess
Interesting, but why is it that the ancient occult writings almost always get a bad rap when hardly anyone truly understand it? Isn't it that one of the reasons that Europe transitioned from the Middle Ages to the Age of Discovery was Gutenberg's invention of the printing press and a good portion of what was printed was books about grimoires, astrology, alchemy, the Kabbalah, hermetica that scared the heck out of the Vatican because of guys like Giordano Bruno? Even St.Augustine was said to have dabbled with alchemy at the latter stage of his life.


edit on 09 11 2015 by MaxTamesSiva because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

That's a good question. I hope I don't sound too condemning in my initial post. I wasn't really going for that angle.

I think anything with the word "occult" attached to it gets a bad wrap because when modern day people think about the occult, they think of Satanism, Luciferianism, human sacrifice, and all types of depravity. We've been conditioned to think in this manner.

It seems like Cyprian (or whoever wrote this ancient book) wasn't too much concerned with taking sides. It seems as if he was well versed in evoking both the highly angelic spirits as well as the demonic ones. It's fascinating in a way, but I think many people (myself included) would be leery at the mere thought of attempting to contact any type of spiritual entity to do one's bidding.

But I agree any part of our past that has been lost or forgotten should most certainly be researched and studied. And then maybe more important links (like the one on this post) can be made and the overall picture of certain subjects can come into clearer view.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: Privy_Princess
Not at all, good answer (insert smiley here).


originally posted by: Privy_Princess
I think many people (myself included) would be leery at the mere thought of attempting to contact any type of spiritual entity to do one's bidding.


Isn't that more or less a description of what a prayer is? (Insert another smiley here).



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

Touche!

It is a very similar act, when you put it like that!

But there is a difference, and I think it's a very large one. In one act, you send up a prayer (or multiple, usually) in faith and hope that your prayers will be received and your wishes granted.

In the other act, you are exerting much more force of will. You first have to learn HOW to do the rituals correctly as well as learning WHO to contact and for what purpose. Then, IF you happen to ever be successful at conjuring some entity up, you don't just ask it for what you want and go on your merry little way. No. You have to bind it! That, to me, is quite audacious!

I personally don't think humans have any right to be playing with things on a spiritual level in that capacity, but hey, to each it's own. I won't knock it because I've never tried it. And I'm sure it will continue to be done as it always has (very secretively)

*shrugs*



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 07:08 PM
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The Jesuits were formed before the book is thought to have been written (1540 vs 1717). Perhaps the author of the grimoire included a Jesuit symbol rather than the other way around...

The attributed author, Cyprianus was thought to be a powerful sorcerer before converting to Christianity.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: Privy_Princess
So the difference are motive or intention, the ritual thingy, full commitment (the follow through) and the acceptance of the consequences of the act? What if we pray to satan to do something good for a change, will that work?



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva


I wonder if Satan would do something good for us, if we ask nicely.

Maybe so, but there will likely be a hefty price to pay. And there will no doubt be trickery involved.



With conventional Christian prayer, you do not have to pay any price. God does not require physical sacrifice from us. All you you have to have is strong faith and (at many times) patience. If you don't get what you want when you want it, you just accept it and keep praying. If you do get it,then it's a gift and all you have to do is be thankful. No sacrifices needed. lol

With conjuring and invocation, you don't really need much faith at all (surprisingly). If an entity is physically showing itself to you in some way, you're likely to believe it exists. lol

But hey, as long as one can accept the consequences, good luck to them.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: Privy_Princess
I rest my case your honor... no further questions.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

By all means, feel free to ask any questions you have!



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Elton

That may be true.

But it doesn't address why the Jesuit symbol was altered.

If something was added to the symbol, it wouldn't nearly be as interesting as something being omitted.



edit on 26-6-2016 by Privy_Princess because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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The same symbols were used in many religions long ago. These symbols have somewhat different meanings in the religions. They have to do with ancient sacred letters and numerals. Sure there is going to be similarity in some of the symbols of religions around the world.

The Catholic church is a decent church, sure they have gone a little astray but they seem to be improving with the new Pope a bit. All religions have their problems. They are creations of men and men have desires and like power.

Jesus never slammed religions but he did raise some questions as to the astray direction they were going in. From what I have read, Jesus seemed to be a decent guy. someone I would like to have coffee with.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 11:59 PM
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Since the Jesuit order was founded three hundred years before this piece of mumbo-jumbo was written, this ‘news’ has no significance at all.

Also, if I were you, I’d go and look the meaning of ‘privy’ up in a dictionary. And change my username.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 12:01 AM
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By all means, feel free to ask any questions you have!

Request to approach the sidebar your honor?... I was just thinking maybe we don't have to put a lot of pressure on satan to do something good for a change, the last thing we want is to receive his wrath, don't we? Maybe we can start by praying for him to do something plain old nice that no one will notice not even The Guy Upstairs, just for starters? Like helping an old lady cross a busy street safely and a bit faster, convincing someone to smoke one less cigarette a day or feeding a hungry child with a decent meal?

Maybe satan will get a kick out of it and do it more often? No? Is it a bad idea that even satan wouldn't approve of? (Pun intended).

My apologies your honor for drifting out of topic and taking advantage of your willingness to answer my questions.



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