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Trying to Quit Smoking Is Not Going Well At All

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posted on Jun, 24 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Indeed, I've now stopped completely. I'd reduced my nicotine content to 0% and I'd vaped that for a few weeks before I just stopped.

After 30 years of trying to give up.

WhiteHat, you should talk to someone about your problems before you give up. You may never succeed. I wish you luck.




posted on Jun, 24 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: Bluesma

The operative term in my statement was "nearly." It certainly wont be everyone's thing!

I have personally moved down from 24mg to 3/6mg. However, and this is important, vaping is not another way of smoking. Its is certainly a nicotine delivery system, as is smoking, patches, and gum. But, these terms have actual definitions and parameters for their use.

Smoking will involve combustion of dry material, usually by way of fire. This produces smoke, which itself introduces some chemical compounds alongside the ones already contained in cigarettes. Moisture is an inhibitor of this process.

Vaping also involves heat, but actual combustion is avoided at all costs. This produces vapor, which due to the significantly lower temperatures and lack of combustion, does not introduce any chemical compounds. Moisture is imperative to this process, which is why liquids are commonly used.

No one should be under the illusion that they have quit nicotine if they are still consuming it, whether that is by vaping, smoking, patches, or gum. Nor is vaping necessarily "healthy," like exercise or eating right. Though, nicotine does actually have some health benefits in low amounts.

However, it is healthier to inhale than a combusted material. This may seem like semantics, but vaping is closer to steam from boiling water and smoking akin to smoke from a campfire. There is quite a bit of science behind the differences. I can see how it would seem misleading if one thought it was just different words for the same thing!

There are quite a few factors to a successful and permanent transition from smoking to vaping. Quality equipment being only one, among everything from juice quality (no nic requires more experience to mix right) to social pressures. Many people have successfully made this transition, but its too bad that you and your friends were not able to find the right mix of variables.

Regardless of all that, it sounds like you have quit again, and I encourage you to keep that up! But, if for whatever reason you should decide to start again, I would encourage you to pick up the vape rather than a pack. The differences aren't just semantic, and if you are going to do one or the other, vaping will have much less impact on your health.
edit on 24-6-2016 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

I'm pretty up on the differences, my comment was more about the idea of being off nicotine. If you lose your vape, you will have to pick up a cigarette.

The nicotine caused certain problems for me, like with my circulation in my extremities and my skin, that made it unacceptable for me to vape.

But mostly, my biggest discomfort with smoking is feeling like a slave to it. It is the addiction. I have a need for freedom and free will, which I feel is gone when I am addicted. Maybe that is why I keep starting and stopping again - I have a perverted desire to show that I am capable of stopping when I choose to. I like exerting that self discipline upon myself each time.

Now I realize I am a freak.



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: Bluesma

i can get that. i take a lot of pride in being a tenacious hardass. And sometimes i like to exercise my will power to remind myself that I am a tenacious hardass.




posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: WhiteHat

Few days ago I went for a second treatment ( they give you one year to come back as much as need it until you quit).


Just curious, what is this "treatment" you went in for?

28 years is a long time to smoke. I smoked for 12 years, about a pack-ish a day), and it took me around a year to stop (of course I didn't really *try* to quit, I guess a was expecting a magical cure). I couldn't quit cold turkey because of A) lack of willpower and addiction and B) so many habits and associations with smoking (coffee, getting in the car and driving to work, drinking, after a meal, as a "reward" to take five after X, etc), and I tried the patch, but finally broke down and got chantix even though I heard about the side effects.

Finally, third month of chantix was almost over (I still smoked while on it) and I ran out of cigarettes one night. I said "I'm not buying another pack tomorrow" and that was it. I don't recall going into any kind of terrible withdrawal, it was just...quit.

Hang in there. Aside from the addiction that messes with your brain and affects your mood, you gotta break that danged habit of association and reward system with every feakin' thing.



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 11:21 AM
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Don't give up.



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: Liquesence

I like all your points about quiting smoking. I quit too. Nicotine addiction is bad. I made a choice to quit and stuck with it. Yes the withdrawal is horrible but after 20 days it goes away.

When another person tells a smoker to quit smoking, that person will not. As you pointed out there has to be the desire to end your addiction. Thank you for your post.



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