It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The SR-71 Is/was AWESOME

page: 1
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:43 PM
link   
I was looking over some SR-71 internet click bait and I found some information about this jet I did not know. What stood out to me is the fact that it first took flight in 1964! I read what it's capabilities were and I am amazed. I listed 6 of the 15 facts that I didn't know.

This page is click bait, but I found it interesting www.odometer.com... s=292359#slide/0/0

The SR-71 Blackbird was a strategic reconnaissance (SR) aircraft built by Lockheed Martin and designed by Clarence Johnson. It took flight in 1964 and kept going until being retired by NASA in 1999. Although this next-gen-looking aircraft never made it to the new millennium, it remains one of the most famous, fastest, and fascinating planes ever flown.


Multi-Talented

The SR-71 did more than just take pictures. It could aim its radar 45 degrees to the side, it could map the terrain like a side-scanning sonar, it could intercept enemy communication and radar signals, and it could record its entire flight path with infrared cameras to prove to countries that it didn't violate their airspace.

Eagle Eyes

The cameras on the Blackbird could take a photograph clear enough to read the license plate on a car on the ground while the plane traveled 80,000 feet above the Earth and at speeds of over 2,000 mph.

I Didn't Do It!

Despite being a spy plane designed to snoop on countries such as Russia and China, an SR-71 has actually never been over the land mass of Russia or China. The planes simply flew around the outskirts, and used their angled cameras and sensors to gather all the info they needed.

Spy Plane Made From Spy Games

The raw materials used to make the Blackbirds was earned through subterfuge. In order to obtain the vast amounts of titanium needed for construction of the planes, the CIA created fake companies throughout the world to purchase the metal from the biggest supplier (and the United State's enemy at the time), the USSR.

To The Stars

The SR-71 had extremely accurate navigation systems, too. It was able to maintain its heading within 1,000 feet while at Mach 3 by using a celestial navigation system nicknamed "R2-D2" that tracked a series of 61 stars. The sensor was so powerful that it was capable of detecting the stars in broad daylight while on the ground.

A Danger To Yourself

None of the 12 Blackbirds lost during service came by way of enemy fire. They were all lost due to accidents.




posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:44 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

There was also a more secret blackbird...not sure if it was named the SR-70?

Even more amazing that our current stealth fighter (Have Blue) started also in the late 60's..made it's debut in 1991 during Desert Storm..Could be wrong on the theater of war..
edit on 23-6-2016 by chrismarco because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: chrismarco
a reply to: seasonal

There was also a more secret blackbird...not sure if it was named the SR-70?

Even more amazing that our current stealth fighter (Have Blue) started also in the late 60's..made it's debut in 1991 during Desert Storm..Could be wrong on the theater of war..

I believe the F-117 was first used operationally in Panama in 1989.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:50 PM
link   
Thanks President Clinton for decommissioning the greatest piece of aerial spy tech the terrestrial world has ever seen...

Shocking to see a democratic president be a pathetic prognosticator of future war needs...and congrats to president Obama for continuing that legacy of pathetic blindness to our needs by cancelling the return trip to the moon(constellation program), the ares v rocket, and most importantly re-focusing nasa on the important mission of making Muslims feel good about their contributions to science...

Well done democrats...

-Christosterone



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: butcherguy

That's what I was referring to F117..perhaps they did use it covertly in Panama but it seems as though the advertised it heavily during Desert Storm in the beginning of the bombing campaign...

After further review it appears as though there was the A-12

"The A-12, which was operated by the CIA, was produced from 1962 to 1964. I performed operational missions from 1963 until 1968. The aircraft was the precursor to the twin-seat YF-12 prototype interceptor and the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. The A-12's final mission was flown in May 1968. The program and aircraft retired that June."

Link

edit on 23-6-2016 by chrismarco because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-6-2016 by chrismarco because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:52 PM
link   
My grandfather was on the team of engineers making the SR-71. He would never tell me how fast it actually goes. He said they set the Mach 3 for the records, but if another plane breaks it, they can wheel out that old bird and break the record again. That always left me wondering how fast it really went.

Fun fact... The plane leaks fuel when on the ground because of expansion. When in the air moving it is all sealed.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:03 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

This plane has always amazed me. Mainly the fact that it really doesn't need any type of stealth since it flies so high and so fast it can just outrun a missile, a missile that probably does not even having enough fuel to reach it anyway. They did have a lot of mishaps with this jet though. Thanks for posting!


iTruthSeeker
edit on 23-6-2016 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:05 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

Be sure to ask Zaphod about Japan way back when. As an SR-71 was struck by lightning. And a thread here started about an article put out by one of the pilots. The article I believe was in the Aviationist... "Flight over the middle east"

Ahhh.. here!👍
theaviationist.com...

"About 2,000 miles across the Atlantic, I peered with awe as the sun came up right in front of my eyes giving me an incredible view."

"The next refueling was a couple hundred miles north of the Azores, where I took on another 5,000 gallons each from two tankers."
Great little read😊
edit on 23-6-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



edit on 23-6-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:12 PM
link   
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I was born in 1970, and I am flabbergasted that this "old" plane kicked so much ass. The reason I am in awe is if it first flew in 1964 that means this is a 1950's design and maybe a 1950's build. Take a look at 1959-1964 cars and there is a stark contrast to this almost space ship.

What is in the air now? All that black budget $ makes me wonder.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:12 PM
link   
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I'm with you, the aircraft has always amazed me given its vintage. The mishaps you referred to, were they pilot error, design/malfunction, or some combination?



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:11 PM
link   
a reply to: chrismarco

The F-117 was first used in Panama and it wasn't covert. The media wrote extensively about hour it was a failure because two aircraft flew down to Panama, arriving as the first strikes did, and bombed a park across from a Panamanian military barracks. Much was made about how much they cost and how they couldn't hit their target.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:13 PM
link   



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: BeefNoMeat
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

I'm with you, the aircraft has always amazed me given its vintage. The mishaps you referred to, were they pilot error, design/malfunction, or some combination?


I think design and pilot error, and the link said that some mechanic left a piece of duct tape somewhere it should not be, which caused the plane to blow into pieces.


iTruthSeeker



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:53 PM
link   
a reply to: iTruthSeeker

There were 50 of all models made, with 20 losses spread across the fleet. That includes 1 of 2 M-21s and 2 of 3 YF-12s.

One aircraft, I THINK an A-12 but not sure off the top of my head, came back with shrapnel from an SA-2 in the skin around the engine. The biggest factor in not being hit was speed. They were so fast that by the time they were on radar it was already almost too late to fire at them.
edit on 6/23/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 6/23/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:59 PM
link   
Old aircraft and yacht designers used to say "If it looks right, it probably is."

I don't think a fast plane has ever looked "more right" than the SR-71.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:12 PM
link   
I like the story of how the set the record for crossing the USA. Don't recall any numbers but took off from CA. turned around over the Pacific and lit it up. Crossed the East coast in record time and slowed down and tuned over the UK...



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:28 PM
link   
a reply to: tinner07

If you're talking the last flight, it was 68 minutes from wheels up to touch down in DC, which included heading off shore to refuel.

Their records were set coming back home from England. A little over 2 hours from London to New York I think it was, and 4 hours to California, I think.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:28 PM
link   
Oops
edit on 6/23/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyosaurus
My grandfather was on the team of engineers making the SR-71. He would never tell me how fast it actually goes. He said they set the Mach 3 for the records, but if another plane breaks it, they can wheel out that old bird and break the record again. That always left me wondering how fast it really went.

Fun fact... The plane leaks fuel when on the ground because of expansion. When in the air moving it is all sealed.


My father was in the Air Force, and in the 70's we were stationed in Japan, we used to watch them land and taxi right into a hanger that would close as soon as it was in. He used to tell a story about pilots getting Mcdonalds in Somewhere in the USA and the fries still being pretty warm when they landed in Japan.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 05:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyosaurus
My grandfather was on the team of engineers making the SR-71. He would never tell me how fast it actually goes. He said they set the Mach 3 for the records, but if another plane breaks it, they can wheel out that old bird and break the record again. That always left me wondering how fast it really went.

Fun fact... The plane leaks fuel when on the ground because of expansion. When in the air moving it is all sealed.

The "leaking" fact is true. They would take off with a minimal amount of fuel, then refuel later so as to minimize fuel loss.

I have it on good authority, which I cannot mention directly but save it to say my father worked for an aerospace contractor which had close ties to Lockheed as well as McDonnell-Douglas and others throughout the 60's through 80's, but this source said the SR-71 and its brethren had a top speed above Mach 5 and its service ceiling was well in excess of 80,000 feet above mean sea level but they were never pushed that hard, at least not in regular usage because of concerns for the airframe.



new topics

top topics



 
8
<<   2 >>

log in

join