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BREAKING: Van Driver In Freddie Gray Case Found Not Guilty On All Counts

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posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Abysha

Mosby's perfect world transport

What cost a great deal of money is a horrible, inexperienced States Attorney which is looking to advance a career, makes damn poor decisions, no regard to evidence, crying racism and buckled to polital pressure 100%... and still has a job!

THAT costs tax payers money.

She was seekng a guilt from day one, without evidence and using her office to launch/advance a fast track political career; using a horrible event, not seeking the truth...how long of a list?

Aquitted in a court of law while being "pre-judged" prior...nice to see the sytem will work even against filthy politicians that forget in what country they live...

mg




posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: matafuchs

For bringing in law enforcement from around Maryland and surrounding states. That was even before the complete investigation. The property damage is not covered by the city but by private individuals / businesses and insurance companies.

Then you have the increased police presence during these trials, including keeping the state national guard on standby.

The city is paying out about 6 million dollars to the family, again before any court action. A payout the Mayor apparently failed to get cleared by city council.

All of which is a direct result of people who can't behave themselves. Since the city / state runs on tax revenue, and that revenue comes from the people, they are getting hit twice.

Paying for their damaged property and paying for the results of these idiots who rioted.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:34 PM
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Thought I remembered reading (back when this situation was unfolding) that he was recovering from a neck injury...

The scuffle with the cops coupled with him beating his head on the van floor/wall and him dying makes more sense if that is true.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

I doubt, very seriously, that would have been supressed during the trial.

The driver was on trial for his driving...and aquitted.

mg



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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let me get this straight...he was handcuffed and leg-shackled, thrown in a van and not secured to the steel bench inside, causing his body to be thrown around the van, and that is his fault.....got it.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

Is that the facts? Is that what was produced in REAL evidence?

or the narrative from day one?

This guy was the driver...no evidence I have read that the driver did anything wrong. Aquitted

mg



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: RomeByFire

originally posted by: Xcathdra

originally posted by: atomish
I'm not surprised but I am disgusted.

Business as usual for the jackboots.


Familiarize yourself with the law and facts of the case before running your mouth.


Dude is allowed to have an opinion.

Familiarize yourself with COMMUNICATION before attempting to stifle it.


That works both ways.

For example: I have the opinion that if one is going to pontificate on the law and legal matters, one should have some degree of familiarity with the law and legal matters. If one doesn't, one's opinion doesn't carry much weight. In my opinion.

And expressing the opinion that one should know something about a subject before one expresses opinions on it isn't "stifling communication." It's expressing an opinion that runs counter to the notion of being ignorant. Not stopping anybody from expressing whatever they want to express, informed or otherwise.

Works both ways, see?



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

Incorrect...

He fled from the police, leading them in a foot pursuit, was caught and taken into custody, handcuffed and taken to the transport van where he was placed inside. The not guilty verdict today was for the van driver and the GPS tracking for the van show no speed limits were exceeded, there were not rapid starts / stops etc.

The driver committed 2 traffic infractions -
* - Failing to come to a complete stop (3 seconds) at a stop sign before proceeding.
* - Making a wide right turn that crossed center yellow (which reduces g force on prisoners in the back).

The prosecutor for this trial was sanctioned for failing to turn over all evidence to the defense. The ME stated to a detective on 2 separate occasions the death was an accident.

I still think Mr. Grey was attempting to injure himself so he could angle for a payout.
edit on 23-6-2016 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: missed_gear
a reply to: jimmyx

Is that the facts? Is that what was produced in REAL evidence?

or the narrative from day one?

This guy was the driver...no evidence I have read that the driver did anything wrong. Aquitted

mg




he died in police custody, while handcuffed and leg-shackled.....yeah, no problem there, right?



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx

Let's try it this way:

The man was on trial for his driving...HIS part of an alleged crime, tried and aquitted.

If he was guilty, in my ever so humble of an opinion, he would have been found guilty, no?

evidence and all that sticky detail stuff..

mg



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:59 PM
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Justice served.

I guess the city will now be asking for the millions they prematurely gave to the vultures in Gray's family to be returned in full.
edit on 23-6-2016 by Deny Arrogance because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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Good. No crime was committed.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: missed_gear

He was charged with 7 crimes, including murder. The driver was the crux of the prosecutions argument on how Grey died. He was found not guilty on all 7 counts.

The other thing to note is it was not a jury trial but a bench trial. Its not easy for the defense to pull the typical stunts to get their client off when the judge is the one they must convince.
edit on 23-6-2016 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: missed_gear

He was charged with 7 crimes, including murder. The driver was the crux of the prosecutions argument on how Grey died. He was found not guilty on all 7 counts.

The other thing to note is it was not a jury trial but a bench trial. Its not easy for the defense to pull the typical stunts to get their client off when the judge is the one they must convince.

He was smart to opt for the bench vs jury, imo.

And it does say a whole lot that he was found not guilty on all counts. Being the driver, he was the one that is responsible for the people being secured in the back before he started traveling.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Yeah the issue with that policy is it was A-new and B-distributed by department email and C-only came into existence shortly before this happened.

All policy updates ive ever seen were announced by email, posted to our communication board, had the updated section placed into our mail inbox and it was discussed at shift briefings.

As for jury verse judge its been my experience that if you are innocent you choose trial by judge and if you arent you choose trial by jury. its easier to confuse jurors apparently.

A policy violation doesnt always equate into supporting a criminal charge, especially if the policy s enacted like it was here. The other problem is because the PA was in such a rush to charge they never allowed the internal investigation to be conducted. Its difficult to argue a policy violation occurred when you dont have an IA investigation report to support it.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: Abysha




For every unarmed person needlessly gunned down by police officers, I hope there are millions in damages and spent resources as a result.


Do you feel the same way every time a police officer is gunned down needlessly at a traffic stop, or because they are just sitting in their cars?



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
Freddie Gray was not gunned down by police. He died because he beat his head on the floor of the van.

...or...

originally posted by: Xcathdra
I still think Mr. Grey was attempting to injure himself so he could angle for a payout.

Sounds like you don't have all the facts.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: tsurfer2000h
a reply to: Abysha




For every unarmed person needlessly gunned down by police officers, I hope there are millions in damages and spent resources as a result.


Do you feel the same way every time a police officer is gunned down needlessly at a traffic stop, or because they are just sitting in their cars?


How often does that happen?

It is quite tragic, but is it common? Not really.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:00 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

Good, glad to see that mans life wasn't completely ruined due to the misbehavior of that hoodlum. Now maybe they will dismiss the rest of the charges on the others. As always there are a few simple ways to make sure your encounters with law enforcement are less stressful and non-lethal.

1. Shut up (like it or not they are in charge while you are detained)
2. Sit Down
3. Keep your hands in plain sight
4. DO NOT RESIST OR RUN
5. Obey ALL lawful orders

Or hey novel idea, stop breaking the law! If you just behave yourself they have no reason to bother you in the first place.

edit on 23-6-2016 by sycomix because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: Greven

actually he most likely beat his head for one reason or the other really make no difference.
from the 5 th stop to the 6th stop at the booking station,one other prisoner, donte allen was in the van.
right after they stopped at the booking station, allen told homicide detectives, that he heard freddie banging his head. this was before the story broke.
then when after the story broke and he talked to the DA he contradicted his story, in public in a news interview.

the judge even slammed the DA for not disclosing to the defense that they had spoke to donte allen.


The opening statements came after a 90-minute hearing in which Circuit Judge Barry G. Williams, who will decide Goodson's fate instead of a jury, blasted prosecutors for failing to disclose to the defense a meeting they had with Allen last year
Officer Goodson trial: Prosecutor says Freddie Gray 'was injured because he got a rough ride'
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Indeed, we know that Allen became concerned about his safety following the disclosure of his initial statement to Detective Boyd. When Allen shared his later, modified narrative with CBS Baltimore on April 30, he explained:

Allen: I had two options today right, either come and talk to y’all and get my credibility straight with ya’ll and not get killed by these [expletive] or not tell a true story. The only reason I’m doing this is because they put my name in a bad state. (emphasis added)

It would also be interesting to know whether any person or persons with a vested interest in driving a particular narrative might have intervened with Donte Allen in the span before his initial “banging and kicking” story and his later “just a little banging” story. Of course, anyone engaging in such an intervention would want that act to remain secret. In this light, the prosecution’s failure to inform Officer Goodson’s defense counsel of a “proffer meeting” they held with Donte Allen during the period between Allen’s “banging and kicking” story and his later “just a little banging” story becomes a bigger deal. Might the prosecutors, who have invested enormous resources and their own professional credibility behind the “police brutality” narrative, have engaged in behavior designed to drive Allen to change his story to favor the prosecutors’ narrative.

Indeed, we know that Allen became concerned about his safety following the disclosure of his initial statement to Detective Boyd. When Allen shared his later, modified narrative with CBS Baltimore on April 30, he explained:

Allen: I had two options today right, either come and talk to y’all and get my credibility straight with ya’ll and not get killed by these [expletive] or not tell a true story. The only reason I’m doing this is because they put my name in a bad state. (emphasis added)

It would also be interesting to know whether any person or persons with a vested interest in driving a particular narrative might have intervened with Donte Allen in the span before his initial “banging and kicking” story and his later “just a little banging” story. Of course, anyone engaging in such an intervention would want that act to remain secret.

In this light, the prosecution’s failure to inform Officer Goodson’s defense counsel of a “proffer meeting” they held with Donte Allen during the period between Allen’s “banging and kicking” story and his later “just a little banging” story becomes a bigger deal. Might the prosecutors, who have invested enormous resources and their own professional credibility behind the “police brutality” narrative, have engaged in behavior designed to drive Allen to change his story to favor the prosecutors’ narrative.

Curiously, prosecutors claim to have maintained absolutely no notes or records of their, until this week, secret meeting with Donte Allen.
Freddie Gray: The Relevance of Donte Allen’s Changing Eyewitness Testimony




edit on 23-6-2016 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



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