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highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid

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posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:30 AM
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A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring. That's the full title.

I know the title is long, but it's what was on the site. Basically it translates to "Flexible power source makes electricity when it bends". It's better known as saTENG.

Here's the abstract from advances.sciencemag.org



Abstract

The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment.


It doesn't seem like the power output is that great, yet, but it certainly has a lot of potential. Mobile phone charging, portable displays, fully wearable digital advertising, maybe even portable internet hotspots. The possibilities (in my mind) are HUGE!
edit on 2062016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:32 AM
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Of course, the work you get out if it will be somewhat less than the work applied. So, if your pants are made out of the stuff, it will feel like they are highly starched.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
Of course, the work you get out if it will be somewhat less than the work applied. So, if your pants are made out of the stuff, it will feel like they are highly starched.


From what I've been reading, your pants (trousers) would feel more like leather or fake leather trousers.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:35 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79
So, if Mick Jagger is wearing them he could power the entire sound system.

Haven't seem him for a few years. Maybe not.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Theoretically, I reckon any high school boy could do more than that



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

I want that, on all my clothes. All of them.

Not only would you reclaim a little electrical energy for every step taken, every movement made, but you would get a resistance workout, just from fighting the stiffness of the fabric! Tone up while you charge your phone! Keep fit while you power your devices and Internet connections!

This has some serious potential... Just imagine boot soles made of the stuff! Good grief!



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:06 AM
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Just build a tree out of the stuff, branches and leaves..

That would make a perfect wind energy generator...

Or wave generators...

Let nature bend it.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

You realize, of course, that walking uses up gravity.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:20 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Art thou pulling upon my leg, old bean?

I was under the impression that gravity was not something one "uses up".




posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Acoustic emission testing is a well-established method for assessment of the mechanical integrity of general service projects. Wireless sensors coupled with a biomechanical model was used to supervise the joint kinematics, muscle forces and joint contact area of the musculoskeletal system of the human body.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:22 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Pfft.
Look at all these "extreme sports." Sky diving, wing suits, hang gliding. Hell, snowboarding. How do they work?

Gravity!

They are all using up our gravity!



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit
That's avery good idea. I didn't think of it, but it would make sense.

a reply to: Phage
Have you been drinking again?

a reply to: ClinaMica
Im not quite sure what that has to do with the thread.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:20 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Hehe!

I do love it when you put your serious hat aside from time to time!

That being said, all of those sports could have a niche into which this material science could be applied. I would have thought that an awful lot of energy could be reclaimed from a wing suit or parachute, if set up correctly. That being said, the version of the fabric used, would have to have a lower stiffness in order to be easily applied to a parachute, because they require to be packed down rather tightly into chute bags, while being flexible enough to deploy cleanly once the cord is pulled.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:24 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit



I would have thought that an awful lot of energy could be reclaimed from a wing suit or parachute, if set up correctly.

Any "wasted energy" is in the form of drag, turbulent airflow and friction. When you are flying, drag is bad for the most part so every effort is made to avoid wasting energy on it.

Attempting to employ this technology for wingsuits would increase drag, the same way making pants out of it would require the burning of more calories.

In the case of unpowered flight, it would just consume more gravity.

edit on 6/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:37 AM
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a reply to: Phage

You would still have some movement as the wind passes over material though. Ripples and what not.

It seems as if this material would be too rigid at the moment, but maybe some sort of composite stitched through might work. Especially on the wing part of the wing suit.

Also, shoes, shorts, tshirts etc. for runners and joggers. Even if it's just on the logos so it's not too restricting. Might be enough to keep the juice in an iPod.
edit on 2062016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:41 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79




You would still have some movement as the wind passes over material though. Ripples and what not.

Less movement. There would be less movement because the "generator" would be applying mechanical resistance. If you are talking about movement of the fabric, that movement would translate to parasitic drag because it would take more energy to move the "wrinkles" the same amount. No free rides.
edit on 6/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:45 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: TerryDon79




You would still have some movement as the wind passes over material though. Ripples and what not.

Less movement. There would be less movement because the "generator" would be applying mechanical resistance. If you are talking about movement of the fabric, that movement would translate to parasitic drag. No free rides.


That makes sense. I guess the skydiving/wing suit comparison wouldn't work very well because of the added resistance due to being more rigid.

Still, it could have real world benefits. maybe making something like a wind sock and have somewhere to store it? Just throwing out ideas lol.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:46 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79



maybe making something like a wind sock and have somewhere to store it? Just t

I think turbines might be more efficient.
And they don't use any gravity.


edit on 6/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:52 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: TerryDon79



maybe making something like a wind sock and have somewhere to store it? Just t

I think turbines might be more efficient.


Very likely, but what about places where win turbines aren't feasible? A wind sock (or many) would take a lot less maintenance than a turbine.

Like I said, it's just ideas from me at the moment. It would all depend on how much energy they could get per sqft or how much the equivalent to the current option would cost.

It's not something I can see being useful tommorow, but certainly some time in the future, if (big if) it's cost effective for the amount of energy produced.

ETA: Are you scared we're going to run out of gravity or something? lol
edit on 2062016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 04:56 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79

Very likely, but what about places where win turbines aren't feasible? A wind sock (or many) would take a lot less maintenance than a turbine.
How long does this wonderful new material last? How does it stand up to the elements? How does it endure UV radiation?



It's not something I can see being useful tommorow, but certainly some time in the future, if (big if) it's cost effective for the amount of energy produced.
I'm afraid it's more of a gimmick than a practical anything. Unless you want to give your phone battery a little boost while on a stroll.
edit on 6/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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