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Graphene-based nanolubricants could grease automotive industry's future

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posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 11:39 PM
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From
nanowerk

19 May 2016

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www.nanowerk.com...=43456.php?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=nanowerkemergingtechnologiesnew s
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So far, nanofluids employing carbon nanotubes have shown the best results. Now, a team of Malaysian scientists from the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and Taylor’s University are examining the effects of adding graphene nanoflakes to various commercially available lubricants. Graphene is an incredibly strong one-atom-thick layer of carbon with excellent thermal and electrical conductivity, and properties for reducing wear and friction.
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The team found that adding just 0.01% graphene nanoflakes compared to the total mass of lubricant improved its thermal conductivity by 17%, with almost no changes in viscosity. The enhancement of the lubricant’s thermal properties generally varied according to the size, concentration and heating rates of the graphene nanoflakes used. The researchers believe that the enhanced thermal properties are due to graphene’s large surface area, even distribution and Brownian motion – the erratic random movement of its molecules due to collisions with other molecules. Improved thermal conduction means the lubricant is better able to carry heat away from an engine.
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The last things I'd ever likely be [so to speak] are a mechanic or a physicist. LOL
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But the research findings sound a bit exciting, to me.
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I've long been fascinated with nano-sized anythings. . . . and with Bucky-balls etc.
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I do have some concerns about them getting in the environment and in our bodies, however.
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And more concerns about the oligarchy deliberately using them in our bodies for less than wonderful reasons and goals.
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But this discovery sounds like a great win in terms of motors etc.
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So, what do the ATS gear-heads think of such?

edit on 19/6/2016 by BO XIAN because: typo




posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:05 AM
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As an amatauer triboligist, I'd normally say,"don't fix what ain't broke". However, here they have isolated a specific characteristic that would have an added benefit, in certain applications.

On of the main functions of a motor oil is to carry away heat from internal areas, bearings and journals.

Still, it doesn't seem like a game changer.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:08 AM
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Also, if it's just an additive mixed into a normal hydrocarbon oil, the idea of a "graphene based" lube is a bit misleading.

Oil is already good at heat transfer, I am surprised there would be a measurable....err, "useful" gain from it.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

Wouldn't the 17% gain be worth it--particularly if it was a cheaper product?

I'm too ignorant to guess about such things.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:21 AM
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originally posted by: BO XIAN



It used to be called chemistry, but you can get more grant money if you call it nanotechnology.



Seriously though, little consideration is being given on the public safety of carbon nano-structures.

The stiffness of nano-structures means they can easily pierce cellular barriers and with their high conductivity electrically, can mess with organizational electrical potentials within organisms (such as Van der Waals forces) that are a requirement of normal function.

Could, for instance, a carbon nano-tube provide a portal for RNA or DNA strands to both exit and enter a cell, causing an accidental "genetic engineering" or horizontal gene transfer of random alien genes?

Here is a link to a Scientific American article that suggests that Carbon Nano-tubes may be as Dangerous as Asbestos.

Although, in the instance of the OP, the nano-tubes are suspended in oil, what happens when that oil oxidizes, through heat or chemical action, releasing the nano-tubes?

edit on 20/6/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 12:29 AM
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originally posted by: FlyingFox
Also, if it's just an additive mixed into a normal hydrocarbon oil, the idea of a "graphene based" lube is a bit misleading.

Oil is already good at heat transfer, I am surprised there would be a measurable....err, "useful" gain from it.


Perhaps there could be a marketing reason: "New Ultra-Lube, now with carbon nano-tubes and fortified with Polonium and Plutonium radicals gives a cooler, more powerful, smoother-running lube..."


edit on 20/6/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Posted two weeks ago in the GRAPHENE Mega thread! And there are even more posts there. Check out the Teslaphoresis vid.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:41 AM
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Other basis for lubrication exists, such as the fluorine in Teflon, chlorinated paraffins and silicones to name a few.

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krytox

www.krytox-lubricants.com...

www.krytox-lubricants.com/


Krytox® Oils and Greases offer a unique combination of properties that provide exceptional, yet cost-effective solutions to your most difficult problems. Compared to other lubricants, only Krytox oils and greases combine high-temperature performance, non-flammability, and chemical inertness under a variety of conditions. Krytox oils and greases increase the service life of critical components, allowing equipment manufacturers to extend warranties, and manufacturing plants to reduce costly maintenance and improve productivity due to component failure.

Krytox® Oils and Greases are exceptional lubricants that provide superior protection and load-carrying ability under the most severe conditions. They are especially suited for use in 100% liquid or gaseous oxygen services. Krytox oils and greases are effective at temperatures as hot as 750°F (399°C) and as cold as -60°F (-51°C). From the aggressive world of chemical processing, to the high temperatures in state-of-the art automotive applications, to the critical tolerances of aerospace mil specs, Krytox oils and greases are becoming the lubricants of choice worldwide.
..



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:45 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: FlyingFox
Also, if it's just an additive mixed into a normal hydrocarbon oil, the idea of a "graphene based" lube is a bit misleading.

Oil is already good at heat transfer, I am surprised there would be a measurable....err, "useful" gain from it.


Perhaps there could be a marketing reason: "New Ultra-Lube, now with carbon nano-tubes and fortified with Polonium and Plutonium radicals gives a cooler, more powerful, smoother-running lube..."



If it's nano, you know it's good.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:46 AM
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originally posted by: Phage

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: FlyingFox
Also, if it's just an additive mixed into a normal hydrocarbon oil, the idea of a "graphene based" lube is a bit misleading.

Oil is already good at heat transfer, I am surprised there would be a measurable....err, "useful" gain from it.


Perhaps there could be a marketing reason: "New Ultra-Lube, now with carbon nano-tubes and fortified with Polonium and Plutonium radicals gives a cooler, more powerful, smoother-running lube..."



If it's nano, you know it's good.



That's what she said!

no, wait, never mind she did NOT say that



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:51 AM
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As well as Titanium....




posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

You know...knowing what I know about titanium and how really, really, really hard it is... I'm not sure I want it rubbing up against the moving parts of my engines.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: FlyingFox
Also, if it's just an additive mixed into a normal hydrocarbon oil, the idea of a "graphene based" lube is a bit misleading.

Oil is already good at heat transfer, I am surprised there would be a measurable....err, "useful" gain from it.

But there IS a noticeable improvement, and it is a game changer.

They added just .01 percent to the oil, and saw a whopping 17% improvement. That is astounding.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 11:37 PM
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That is an astounding performance result.

As for the Ti additive, it gets worked into the metal lattice, sort of how antimony hardens lead in bearing babbit.



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

I can understand that. Ti is not actually acting as a lubricant then?



posted on Jun, 21 2016 @ 02:46 AM
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dbl post
edit on 21-6-2016 by FlyingFox because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2016 @ 02:53 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: FlyingFox

I can understand that. Ti is not actually acting as a lubricant then?


Not likely in this case, I am unsure, but most additives are multi-function....anti-wear, friction modifier, anti-oxidizer, "EP" extreme pressure agent, detergent, dispersant etc etc. In a sense they are not exactly lubricants themselves either.

I just pulled a report on the oil out of my Audi V6 from the local Caterpillar Labs for $13





Wear metals correspond to different parts of the engine, contaminates, or lack of, like Silicon....dirt from a leaky intake will show up and cause excess ring wear (chrome and tin), no significant sodium which would mean a coolant leak.

Other elements, like zink, Mg, Phos and Calcium are typical oil additives, plus Boron is usually included, but not tested for here. Then we have the oil condition, sulfation, oxidation, nitration that tell us about the oil service condition. Other data is the presence of water and fuel (common in DI engines) and finally the visc at the reference operating temp of +100c, measured at 12cSt or centi-strokes.

Here I have very low wear for 7500miles, 5q of Pennzoil Platinum 5w-30 (gas-to-liquid base oil) and a half gallon of Rotella Synth 5w-40, both Shell products and similar additives...

I'm open to any questions on the subject.
edit on 21-6-2016 by FlyingFox because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2016 @ 02:55 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox




I just pulled a report on the oil out of my Audi V6 from the local Caterpillar Labs for $13

Heh. Oil analysis.
If I manage to change my oil at 6k I figure I'm on it.

edit on 6/21/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2016 @ 03:01 AM
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Yeah, that sounds good, but my method is to go by the calendar. 6 month intervals let's me change visc for summer/winter and is about the ideal miles....can go up to 10k really, but is usually 5000-6000. Best part is it keeps me from having to count miles, and wonder if I should go 3k,5k,6k...?

The winter/summer oil thing is a big deal for people running 5w-40 weight in cold. Here, you see it's 3x thicker than 5w-30.



The 0w-30 German Syntec listed here is a thick European 30, really the same as a 0w-40 for our purposes. The point being that proper lube doesn't happen with thick cold oil, it needs to warm up and flow, especially to lube a turbo.
edit on 21-6-2016 by FlyingFox because: freedom



posted on Jun, 21 2016 @ 03:02 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

I decided a while ago to not live where it gets cold, so...



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