It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Earth's atmosphere is traveling back in time, and that's a very bad thing

page: 3
19
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 04:19 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

So we have been here before and we will be here again?




posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 07:44 PM
link   

originally posted by: Baddogma
a reply to: Spacespider

The Mars remark made me chuckle as we might have already done that migration, except from Mars to here, Earth!

I know it's weird, derided and slightly off topic, but the facts are there are signatures of (very likely) artificial nuclear explosions on Mars from a quarter million years ago and it used to be Earth like... do the math.

As far as our carbon emissions, the bad ol' climate scientists say we should've been worried back in the mid 20th century... and now should be post panicked and resigned to a hellscape.

It will be worse than losing ocean front property... much, much worse.



well we ruined mars with a war destroying the planets atmosphere somehow. so we went to earth to start over.



posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 11:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheBulk

originally posted by: lostbook
Interesting read here concerning Globsl warming. Appareantly, we've just passed the dreaded 400 parts per million for Carbon Dioxide this past May 23. Humanity hasn't seen this level of CO2 in the atmosphere since the Pliocene Era; a period when the Arctic was covered in forests and the oceans were 16 to 131 feet higher than present times.

Should we worry? What says ATS?

www.businessinsider.com...


Since none of the predicted cataclysms have come to pass I'd say probably not.


What concerns me is the fact that we aren't seeing a full result from the melting glaciers yet we've broken Global temperature records every month for the past couple of years, it seems. I worry that there will be a sudden change to the environment and not a gradual one.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 12:34 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

For what it's worth:

I live on the waterside. I have done so for the past 20 years. I spent my 0-19 years in a house very near where I now live. In case you're adding up the numbers, I'm older than 39. In the past five years I have observed a marked increase in the extent of seawater incursion. A nice little bank from my lawn to the "beach" has quite quickly become a three foot cliff. Along the extent of my seawall, the grass which used to grow to the wall, is now dead in a strip about 3 feet in from the seawall

There is a tidal reference station within 2 miles of my home. The data from that station shows that, in the past forty years the highest high tide levels have measurably increased. My personal observations show a rate increase over the past 5.


edit on 6/19/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 02:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook

For what it's worth:

I live on the waterside. I have done so for the past 20 years. I spent my 0-19 years in a house very near where I now live. In case you're adding up the numbers, I'm older than 39. In the past five years I have observed a marked increase in the extent of seawater incursion. A nice little bank from my lawn to the "beach" has quite quickly become a three foot cliff. Along the extent of my seawall, the grass which used to grow to the wall, is now dead in a strip about 3 feet in from the seawall

There is a tidal reference station within 2 miles of my home. The data from that station shows that, in the past forty years the highest high tide levels have measurably increased. My personal observations show a rate increase over the past 5.


It's a little scary put in perspective like that. I too have noticed that everytime there's a major storm there's major flooding. I think the Earth is re-drawing its maps. Get to high ground, Phage!



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 03:40 AM
link   

originally posted by: Teikiatsu
a reply to: lostbook

The Medieval Warming period was a time on earth when civilization thrived. It was warm enough for grapes to grow in Britain and for Viking settlers to land on Greenland and mine what is now under ice.

The Little Ice Age gave us the Black Death and Dark Ages.

Note that this was all before modern medicine.

I'll take the warmer over the colder... and I'm a winter person.



Fleas on the backs of black rats coming to the west on trade ships from the east 'gave' us Bubonic plague, nothing to do with ices ages



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:32 AM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Thing that bothers me most as I am ignorant on the contingency plans for all of the nuclear power plants that are just at sea level. I know of one that is down at the coast here in NC close to where I go play....fish and camp. With the sea level rise slow or fast what kind of plans are in place to deal with this? I am truly curious as I really don't know and being ignorant on the subject , nuclear scares me anyway. Do you have any idea or does anyone else on this matter?



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:55 AM
link   
a reply to: Phage

If the all ice melts wouldn't it just be 8 countries which now have more land and the Arctic ocean?




Some scientists define the Arctic as the area north of the arctic tree line (green line in map at right), where the landscape is frozen and dotted with shrubs and lichens. Other researchers define Arctic based on temperature. Using this definition, the Arctic includes any locations in high latitudes where the average daily summer temperature does not rise above 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit).


If forest grows in The Arctic will that area it even be considered the Arctic when the ice recedes?



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 11:14 AM
link   
a reply to: Phage

The unfortunate thing as you said before in another thread is the fact that there are differing bodies of water around the planet and those said bodies are not uniform. That's why some see what is happening and some do not. I think it will take a major flooding event for people to realize what's happening. Unfortunately, by then it might be too late.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 12:43 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Inundation is not the only problem presented by rising sea levels. In many places it will cause seawater incursions of freshwater supplies.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 01:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook

Inundation is not the only problem presented by rising sea levels. In many places it will cause seawater incursions of freshwater supplies.


Good point. Rising seas will uncover many problems that we just are not ready for. The shortcomings will definitely outweigh the benefits.

There will be dramatic effects on our food and water supplies. Not to mention our health.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 01:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: Spacespider
Sounds like someone is going to press reset soon.
I hope we make it in time... to Mars


Yep, it does indeed sound that way.

When civilization fails, I'll be "that guy", the one quietly cackling with joy while everyone else is terrified and febrile, running around like chickens with their heads cut off in utter confusion.

The reset is far past due, IMO.




top topics



 
19
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join