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Printing metal in midair (w/ video)

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posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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via nano werk
17 May 2016

Nanowerk News
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www.nanowerk.com...=43420.php?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=nanowerkemergingtechnologiesnews
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ORIGINALLY from
"Laser assisted direct ink writing of planar and 3D metal architectures"
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at:
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www.pnas.org...
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This article:
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www.nanowerk.com...=43420.php?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=nanowerkemergingtechnologiesnews
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(Nanowerk News) "Flat" and "rigid" are terms typically used to describe electronic devices. But the increasing demand for flexible, wearable electronics, sensors, antennas and biomedical devices has led a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) to innovate an eye-popping new way of printing complex metallic architectures -- as though they are seemingly suspended in midair.
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Lewis' team used an ink composed of silver nanoparticles, sending it through a printing nozzle and then annealing it using a precisely programmed laser that applies just the right amount of energy to drive the ink's solidification. The printing nozzle moves along x, y, and z axes and is combined with a rotary print stage to enable freeform curvature. In this way, tiny hemispherical shapes, spiral motifs, even a butterfly made of silver wires less than the width of a hair can be printed in free space within seconds. The printed wires exhibit excellent electrical conductivity, almost matching that of bulk silver.
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When compared to conventional 3D printing techniques used to fabricate conductive metallic features, laser-assisted direct ink writing is not only superior in its ability to produce curvilinear, complex wire patterns in one step, but also in the sense that localized laser heating enables electrically conductive silver wires to be printed directly on low-cost plastic substrates.
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Video link:
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www.youtube.com...
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I found the video beautiful . . . almost a thrill.
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I would think that the potential to create computing and biologically useful pieces, structures could be enormous and very exciting.
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I'd think that artists could also have a lot of fun with such a tool.
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Are there any ATSers working in such tech areas?
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I'd think that creative folks getting a hold of such a technology could go many uncharted places.
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I think the video is just fun, as well.
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posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 02:52 PM
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Just watched it. Fascinating. Thanks for posting.



posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 02:52 PM
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Indeed, the technology there really has no limitations, except for that of the material being used and what is being asked of the structure.

Could make some lovely jewelry, and sculptures / art-work with that setup too.



posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

What have you thought of using it for?



posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: Cygnis

What sorts of jewelry do you tend to like, make? What colors of stones?

How would this tech fit into that?



posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 02:54 AM
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I used to make chainmail. It took months and months to make a simple vest. I wonder if someday they'll be able to just print out a big sheet of chainmail using this tech. Because the world needs better, cheaper access to chainmail.



posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 07:21 PM
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originally posted by: Royweeezy
I used to make chainmail. It took months and months to make a simple vest. I wonder if someday they'll be able to just print out a big sheet of chainmail using this tech. Because the world needs better, cheaper access to chainmail.


Hmmmmm I wonder if a left shoulder of chainmail would protect my pacemaker from EMP???



posted on Jun, 18 2016 @ 07:43 PM
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originally posted by: BO XIAN

originally posted by: Royweeezy
I used to make chainmail. It took months and months to make a simple vest. I wonder if someday they'll be able to just print out a big sheet of chainmail using this tech. Because the world needs better, cheaper access to chainmail.


Hmmmmm I wonder if a left shoulder of chainmail would protect my pacemaker from EMP???

Nope.
You're toast.

edit on 6/18/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Why did you post this?

You actively post anything and everything you can against, science, like you did here.

I'm surprised you aren't berating the amazing science on display. Or, is this just another example of the corruption of science and scientists at work?

I find your methodology of posts very oxymoronic.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

I don't work in the area, but I hold a degree in it and model/3d print as a hobby, I've always thought of it as a back up field in the event my computer science plan doesn't pan out.

I'm not so sure about this printing technology, it's neat to look at but it looks like it has pretty limited use, though in the niche where it's good it should be very good.


originally posted by: BO XIAN
What sorts of jewelry do you tend to like, make? What colors of stones?


I've made a few items and thrown them on shapeways, never made money off them but some people bought them and found them cool, so that's neat. With jewelry, 3d printing lets you make complex patterns and it's great for just in time manufacturing, you can offer the same item in several different materials or with slight customization and build it to spec without having to keep a stockpile.

I think that what we're going to see with 3d printing in coming years is local "replicator centers" to borrow Star Trek imagery, where we purchase an item online, have it 3d printed locally, and then either pick it up in person or delivered through local mail rather than building a complete item and then shipping it. Instead we will ship the raw material and build locally on demand.


originally posted by: Royweeezy
I used to make chainmail. It took months and months to make a simple vest. I wonder if someday they'll be able to just print out a big sheet of chainmail using this tech. Because the world needs better, cheaper access to chainmail.


With a big enough print area, yes. This technology would be pretty bad for that purpose though because of how chain links together. This is better for items that don't have much thickness like printing complex wire patterns (for example, imagine a robot inside your home walls printing out a complex wiring scheme without running wire anywhere) but chain is pretty thick some of the other existing technology would be better.



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