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Is this body shaming?

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posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: Parafitt
a reply to: peppycat

Absolutely. I'm ok with this


Amy Schumer, now she is not a skinny model, but damn she is one gorgeous woman.

I get the feeling however, if she was advertising is similar attire, it wouldn't matter. banned. :/
I'm starting to wonder whether ''fat shaming'' is really the issue and if the times/beliefs or what have you are cycling back to more of a modest mindset... like how bell bottom shaped pants were back in style for a bit there.




posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: interupt42


, because as a brilliant man once said "I like big butts and I can not lie".


i guess that's why kim widea@@ian, oops i meant kardashian is so popular with men.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:14 PM
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originally posted by: peppycat
Plus size super models have nothing to be ashamed of and can look pretty darn good in a two piece...I doubt these women are "out of shape''/unhealthy...


If taking down the posters of women in a two piece isn't for the sake of modesty, then maybe it should be okay to put up plus size super models that are also healthy.😊


I always thought the models job was to showcase a designers clothing. I guess designers are now trying to sell their clothing to a broader market which is smart. I am not under the impression it is any thing other then that however, the backlash shows in many forms, you end up with stuff like this:



Because some advertisers use plus size models to emulate the meme "big is beautiful" case in point:

Source




While most people are pleased that more full-bodied women are being recognized in the fashion industry, there is still a fierce debate raging over what this modelling category should be called. Size 22 model Tess Holliday, 30, is calling out other models who are trying to do away with the label 'plus-size', saying that it's hypocritical of them to pose for – and get paid by – a plus-size company without embracing the term. 'I find it interesting that plus-size models don't want to be called "plus-size" but don't mind taking a check from a PLUS-SIZE company,' she tweeted on October 25 Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk... abel.html#ixzz4BglMjRMf Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



Does she look healthy? It looks like to me the people manipulating people into buying things do not care about your health and try and sell things to ANYONE with money. It is all a marketing ploy, health has nothing to do with it, these people are trying to tell the world this is beautiful, I do not think this is healthy or beautiful and I think it is both low, and disgusting. Those are just my personal opinions and I do not expect everyone to agree with me on this.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie




i guess that's why kim widea@@ian, oops i meant kardashian is so popular with men.


Only if she comes with a mute button.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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originally posted by: Parafitt
a reply to: Brotherman

Possibly.. but the article doesnt state this..


The ad was defaced in subway stations across London when it appeared in April 2015, and it drew strong protests.

On Monday, London’s new mayor, Sadiq Khan, announced a ban on such ads — which critics call “fat-shaming” — from London’s public transportation system starting in July, saying the messages encourage unhealthy body images for young women.


More likely people who didn't want skimpy ladies, were upset...

seems since then, it has become a political tool. That is why I queried it. people deface things all the time, but rarely does it become political where critics chime in after the fact. Seems to me, it is more now using the critics to justify a new policy, than the critics creating it...



Of coarse I did state I was being hypothetical, it could be any one or two reasons, ardent Muslims or other religious idealists with a similar belief that think ladies need head gear and full body dresses, homosexuals that believe female bodies are disgusting, feminists seeking more equality, people seeking more PC compliant ads etc all could be the people that deface and complain to have something banned, sky is the limit, doesn't matter.

I am not trying to conclude the who or the why even though I know those can all be possibilities I am trying to say though that because people found this controversial because of any one reason the advertiser did their jobs, no more no less.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Parafitt

I don't think it is body shaming.

It could, IMO, be body shaming in reverse.

In other words, because she has a lovely figure it can't be displayed in advertising? This world is so upside down and backwards to me anymore.

She looks fantastic and if that encourages folks to want to become healthier and exercise more and eat less (but still healthy) then what's the harm? Finding a way to help people feel a little better about their current situation be it with their looks, life situation, self esteem is a good thing IMO.

We go to the beach every year and there are 100s if not 1000s of women who look this good or better or worse. In bikinis. So what? That is beach attire isn't it?

I, personally, think it's a slap in the face to people with eating disorders (of all kinds) to act as if the root cause is seeing thin, attractive, fit people in the media or around them in their everyday lives. Is it really that simple?

If it is, then locking them away for a period of time shutting out all media and people who are thin, attractive, and fit should cure them, yes?



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:24 PM
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I think it just made people uncomfortable and fat shaming was a good excuse. But that's ok too, maybe we should have limits of what images can be displayed on massive boards in high traffic public areas.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:24 PM
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I can't be the only one who sees...'body shaming' is not the real reason the esteemed new mayor is banning the female form. He is using the west's progressive sensitivities as cover for a big step towards sharia law.

My friends across the pond...please open your eyes. Don't wake up one day wondering where your culture has gone.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman I totally get what you are saying about the advertisers wanting to sell their product without much concern other than money... but I personally don't think the ideal healthy size is necessarily that of the model in OP and I don't think the pictures you showed are of a healthy body weight... in the slightest by any means... but at least they are realistic and some people want to celebrate being that big... okay by me and some cultures, perhaps even ancient people...

For some, being large is a sign of plenty and wealth... but also could be a symbol of gluttony and over indulgence...

I just think that really big women need images that aren't out of the realm of possibility when it comes to being healthy, eating right and exercising... without resorting to surgery or surgeries. It is easier to lose weight when the goal is actually achievable.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:11 PM
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originally posted by: Parafitt
Is this body shaming? I ask because of what just happened in the UK. I live in a country where this is common, and just want an idea. to me this is not body shaming. We have wonderful models here, who sell swimwear, even indigenous ladies, and no one ever complains...

Is this worthy of being banned, and all future such things banned?




“Are you beach body ready?” asked the ad for Protein World, a maker of dietary supplements. The ad was defaced in subway stations across London when it appeared in April 2015, and it drew strong protests.

On Monday, London’s new mayor, Sadiq Khan, announced a ban on such ads — which critics call “fat-shaming” — from London’s public transportation system starting in July, saying the messages encourage unhealthy body images for young women.


Or something else...



I dont think it's body shaming. But I also don't see the need to be bombarded with semi naked women everywhere.

Yes I'm straight. Yes i like to look at sexy women. But i also feel society is too sexualised these days.



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:14 PM
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originally posted by: OpenMindedRealist
I can't be the only one who sees...'body shaming' is not the real reason the esteemed new mayor is banning the female form. He is using the west's progressive sensitivities as cover for a big step towards sharia law.

My friends across the pond...please open your eyes. Don't wake up one day wondering where your culture has gone.


Oh dear. You poor poor scared American. Let me put your mind at ease.

Out New muslim mayor is doing no such thing. He can't even if he wanted to. But he isn't trying to do that. He's expressing his opinion as a father of 2 girls.

Google his family. They are all western girls. Dress like normal, no headscarf, no nothing.

And by the way. A lot of people agree with him. Including me, a staunch atheist, and I would imagine your Christian leaders who value modesty as well.

Stop buying into what you read so readily. It's not a good look for you guys.

Posters of girls in bikinis is not our culture. You know what is part of it though? Open arms and tolerance. Something you guys seem to be lacking
edit on 15-6-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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I thought it was photoshop.

How long is the beach season in Britain, by the way?

edit on 15-6-2016 by Teikiatsu because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:27 PM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
I thought it was photoshop.

How long is the beach season in Britain, by the way?


8 days



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:27 PM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
I thought it was photoshop.

How long is the beach season in Britain, by the way?


8 days



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:27 PM
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originally posted by: Teikiatsu
I thought it was photoshop.

How long is the beach season in Britain, by the way?


8 days



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: peppycat

I'm not sure ancient belief is applicable here.

All I am saying banned or not the ad maker did their job.

It is talked about here and obviously commented on and talked about all over the place. I am saying the media ploy is probably a great success.

I bet the company has seen great spikes in its page views and more people have done research onto this place and product then what it had before the ad was banned.

My only point.



posted on Jun, 16 2016 @ 01:33 AM
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Personally doesn't bother me, and as a bisexual female I don't mind female bodies on display(and am quite open when it comes to porn and nudity).

(I know I'll get hate for it) but can see the concern put forth about the ads. That is because young girls-under 10 years old now days have eating disorders, affected in part by what they are exposed to in the media. Growing up, knowing some anorexic girls my age, it was heartbreaking.

Though, as an adult, I can discern what's real and what is not as some ads have heavy airbrushed models and Photoshop. That many young girls cannot, nor understand that many of the women work hard for their bodies and some are more natural-not everyone can be as thin. Also, as a Graphic Designer-who many of us also feel in part the design industry need to address the situation as well.



posted on Jun, 16 2016 @ 06:32 AM
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originally posted by: dreamingawake


(I know I'll get hate for it) but can see the concern put forth about the ads. That is because young girls-under 10 years old now days have eating disorders, affected in part by what they are exposed to in the media. Growing up, knowing some anorexic girls my age, it was heartbreaking.



Yeah but blaming the ads? Come on, that is just excusing bad parenting. If a girl is so impressionable that ads make her stop eating there has to be some deeper reason. It is not the ad itself.

The psychological issues thought to be of influence :


    a tendency towards depression and anxiety
    finding it difficult to handle stress
    excessive worrying and feeling scared or doubtful about the future
    perfectionism – setting strict, demanding goals or standards
    being very emotionally restrained


All of which can be directly connected to parenting and neglect.



posted on Jun, 16 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014
Are willful ignorance and petulant behavior a part of your culture too?

When you finally are forced to face reality, you won't find much compassion from people who have tirelessly warned you.



posted on Jun, 16 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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originally posted by: DupontDeux

originally posted by: dreamingawake


(I know I'll get hate for it) but can see the concern put forth about the ads. That is because young girls-under 10 years old now days have eating disorders, affected in part by what they are exposed to in the media. Growing up, knowing some anorexic girls my age, it was heartbreaking.



Yeah but blaming the ads? Come on, that is just excusing bad parenting. If a girl is so impressionable that ads make her stop eating there has to be some deeper reason. It is not the ad itself.

The psychological issues thought to be of influence :


    a tendency towards depression and anxiety
    finding it difficult to handle stress
    excessive worrying and feeling scared or doubtful about the future
    perfectionism – setting strict, demanding goals or standards
    being very emotionally restrained


All of which can be directly connected to parenting and neglect.


Bad parenting and neglect, really? Everyone of these children are not in that same category-for ex-have an in-law who is a bulimic male-Drs. say it is due to being influenced Autism factors as well as has OCD. Wish it was easy as one cause to help stop this but unfortunately many very good parents have children who have disorders.



What Causes an Eating Disorder?

Eating disorders are complex illnesses with a genetic component that can be affected by a wide variety of biological and environmental variables. Eating disorders include a range of conditions that involve an obsession with food, weight and appearance. The obsession is often so strong that it disrupts an individual’s health, social and familial relationships, occupations and daily activities. It is estimated that over 10 million people in the United States suffer from eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, and the statistics are growing. Research on the causes of eating disorders is constantly evolving, and we continue to gain increased insight into risk factors that may contribute to the illness. However, the answers remain multi-factorial, and they reflect a complex combination of biopsychosocial factors that may intersect differently for each person.


Not sure of your source(share if you can), but many sources from research go on to pointing this out;
Sociocultural Ideals is included in the list as a factor.



Our media’s increased obsession with the thin-ideal and industry promotion of a “perfect” body may contribute to unrealistic body ideals in people with and without eating disorders.15,16 An increase in access to global media and technological advances such as Photoshop and airbrushing have further skewed our perception of attainable beauty standards. In 1998, a researcher documented the response of adolescents in rural Fiji to the introduction of western television.17,18 This new media exposure resulted in significant preoccupations related to shape and weight, purging behavior to control weight, and negative body image. This landmark study illustrated a vulnerability to the images and values imported with media. Given that many individuals exposed to media and cultural ideals do not develop clinical eating disorders, it may be that individuals already at-risk, have increased vulnerability to society’s messages about weight and beauty and, perhaps, seek out increased exposure to them.

Source1
As I mentioned elsewhere on the forum, media influence can heighten an underlying disorder. No, that's not always the parents fault.




"Daughter has eating disorder: Am I a bad parent?"


The first point to make is that eating disorders are associated with economic development. They do not exist in subsistence societies where food is scarce and daily life involves a lot of physical exertion. In that sort of environment, people would as soon stop breathing as choose not to eat (or purge their food).

Second, eating disorders increase in frequency when more women enter the work force and compete for entry to professions. During the roaring twenties, for example, women enjoyed unprecedented economic opportunities. Weight loss was in vogue, slenderness was emphasized in flapper fashions and eating disorders reached epidemic proportions. Third, eating disorders occur because curvaceous female figures are unfairly perceived as lacking in professional competence (see The Science of Romance, pp. 240-244) .

This phenomenon is the bimbo stereotype. It is the reason that women are advised never to wear tight clothes to a job interview. Women's desire to be more slender is thus related to social pressures to succeed in education and in employment.

Source
Men also, in many career sectors have EDs as well, not counting the growing amount of young boys developing it.




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