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Even if its lifeless, i still think Jupiter should be classed as an enemy planet.

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posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014




So it would be fairly large? Which is what i thought, which is why im suprised there are no "approach" photos.

That would depend on how far away it is. Again, provide distance instead of transit time and the calculation of the angular diameter of Jupiter is a trivial trig problem.




posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: 3danimator2014




So it would be fairly large? Which is what i thought, which is why im suprised there are no "approach" photos.

That would depend on how far away it is. Again, provide distance instead of transit time and the calculation of the angular diameter of Jupiter is a trivial trig problem.


True, but last time i did any maths was 20 years ago during my physics course at uni. In that time, i have forgotten everything i knew. I used to be smart. 20 years of 3d animation has rendered my brain dull and useless.

Also, im working late tonight, so i dont have time right to look into it right now, which is why i thought one of you brainiacs would already know the answer.


I guess one could use celestia to find out the answer.

I dont even know what a differential equation is any more
And maths was one of my strong subjects during the course. How sad
edit on 19-6-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: Phage
As of last Thursday, Juno is 8.6 million miles (13.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter.

Let's do some maths!




posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

0.6º?

Full Moon sizish.
He would be looking awesome, along with his posse.

edit on 6/19/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 10:05 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: wildespace

0.6º?

Full Moon sizish.
He would be looking awesome, along with his posse.


Is that it? Huh...i assumed it would be bigger



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014
You are welcome.
3001 was ok, but it was my least favorite of the series.
I would be more than happy to discuss about 2010 once you finish it.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 04:41 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014
Well, here you go, the first image: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...



astronomynow.com...

The visible camera on NASA’s Juno spacecraft is capturing a time-lapse movie of Jupiter and its four largest moons as the orbiter dives toward the giant planet for a 4 July rendezvous, and officials have released a first taste of the views armchair scientists and space enthusiasts can anticipate over the coming weeks and months.

The JunoCam instrument aboard Juno captured the colour view of Jupiter and its moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto on 21 June at a distance of 10.9 million kilometres (6.8 million miles) from Jupiter. NASA released the picture Friday.

The golden hues of Jupiter’s atmospheric bands are just coming into view, and JunoCam will resolve more detail in the coming days.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 04:43 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Jupiter and his posse.
What a ride that would be.



posted on Jun, 26 2016 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: wildespace

Jupiter and his posse.
What a ride that would be.

I find it amazing that I viewed Jupiter and the four Galilean moons in my binoculars. Took a few pictures using a 300mm lens, and could make out Jupiter's bands upon blowing the image up x4.



I'm not sure what Jupiter's angular resolution is from Earth, but I swear is appears larger than a dot in binoculars.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: wildespace

Jupiter and his posse.
What a ride that would be.

I find it amazing that I viewed Jupiter and the four Galilean moons in my binoculars. Took a few pictures using a 300mm lens, and could make out Jupiter's bands upon blowing the image up x4.



I'm not sure what Jupiter's angular resolution is from Earth, but I swear is appears larger than a dot in binoculars.


I was always sure i can see Jupiters disk through my monocular. I never thought that i may NOT be.



posted on Jun, 27 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: 3danimator2014
Well, here you go, the first image: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...



astronomynow.com...

The visible camera on NASA’s Juno spacecraft is capturing a time-lapse movie of Jupiter and its four largest moons as the orbiter dives toward the giant planet for a 4 July rendezvous, and officials have released a first taste of the views armchair scientists and space enthusiasts can anticipate over the coming weeks and months.

The JunoCam instrument aboard Juno captured the colour view of Jupiter and its moons Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto on 21 June at a distance of 10.9 million kilometres (6.8 million miles) from Jupiter. NASA released the picture Friday.

The golden hues of Jupiter’s atmospheric bands are just coming into view, and JunoCam will resolve more detail in the coming days.


Awsome. Thanks you mate



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 05:21 AM
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Hey all, i found this pretty interesting page on the NASA website. A real time ride along Juno, which also answers my previous (already answered) question about how big Jup if one were onboard the probe.


www.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Jupiter is the Sol systems cosmic vacuum cleaner. The planet is responsible for scooping up rather a lot of any incoming asteroids and comets by way of them becoming entangled in her massive gravitational field.

Shes probably saved the Earth from taking a few KO punches and staved off ELEs a number of times.

Just look at comet shoemaker levy 9 for an example. So shes hardly an enemy planet, point of fact she our friend and guardian of sorts. Radioactivity aside of course.

en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 29-6-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Jupiter is the Sol systems cosmic vacuum cleaner. The planet is responsible for scooping up rather a lot of any incoming asteroids and comets by way of them becoming entangled in her massive gravitational field.

Shes probably saved the Earth from taking a few KO punches and staved off ELEs a number of times.

Just look at comet shoemaker levy 9 for an example. So shes hardly an enemy planet, point of fact she our friend and guardian of sorts. Radioactivity aside of course.

en.wikipedia.org...


I know this



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 05:57 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

I suppose the radiation belts could be a problem should we ever develop the technology regarding travel to or colonization of one of her many moons.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: 3danimator2014

I suppose the radiation belts could be a problem should we ever develop the technology regarding travel to or colonization of one of her many moons.



Yes, Io and the closer moons receive FAR more radiation than we are used to on Earth. various sources report various amounts, but i think its roughly fatal dosage in a day or 2 on Io.



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 06:36 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
Hey all, i found this pretty interesting page on the NASA website. A real time ride along Juno, which also answers my previous (already answered) question about how big Jup if one were onboard the probe.


www.nasa.gov...

There's even a livestream on Youtube: www.youtube.com...



posted on Jun, 29 2016 @ 06:38 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: 3danimator2014
Hey all, i found this pretty interesting page on the NASA website. A real time ride along Juno, which also answers my previous (already answered) question about how big Jup if one were onboard the probe.


www.nasa.gov...

There's even a livestream on Youtube: www.youtube.com...


That is super cool. What a time we live in


edit on 29-6-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-6-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 09:21 AM
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JPL have now published a video with the time-lapse of JunoCam's images of the approach:

www.youtube.com...




After five years traveling through space to its destination, NASA's Juno spacecraft will arrive in orbit around Jupiter today, July 4, 2016. This video shows a peek of what the spacecraft saw as it closed in on its destination before instruments were turned off.


By the way, I think it's the first time I've seen "half Jupiter". We're so used to seeing the fully-lit Jupiter, so this is a somewhat strange sight.
edit on 4-7-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 09:38 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
JPL have now published a video with the time-lapse of JunoCam's images of the approach:

www.youtube.com...




After five years traveling through space to its destination, NASA's Juno spacecraft will arrive in orbit around Jupiter today, July 4, 2016. This video shows a peek of what the spacecraft saw as it closed in on its destination before instruments were turned off.


By the way, I think it's the first time I've seen "half Jupiter". We're so used to seeing the fully-lit Jupiter, so this is a somewhat strange sight.


Interesting if undewhelming video. Thanks for posting. And you are right about half Jupiter, its weird seeing it like that.

Now we wait for someone to complain about the quality of the video and question why its not sharper



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