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Even if its lifeless, i still think Jupiter should be classed as an enemy planet.

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posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Ah the Io flux tube...

Yes, Io gets a lot of radiation from Jupiter, as well as being squeezed and kneaded like a doughball, driving its amazing amount of volcanism. Smashing little object, is Io. One of the most fascinating moons in our solar system, topped only by Europa in my opinion and only by way of Europa being a massive potential source of water in our solar system.

But in terms of Jupiter being deadly... Yes, even in proximity to the planet amounting to the orbit of some of its satellites, the planet outputs quite a staggering amount of ionising radiation. But it is only deadly if you do not account for it. Pretty soon (next couple of decades) plasma sheilding mechanisms will be coming on stream, and I do not suggest that because I am a sci fi geek (although I absolutely am one of those, without a doubt), but because research and testing on small scales has already begun, was actually begun in earnest last decade if I recall correctly. Some clever folks from Sheffield were looking into it, last I heard.

Assuming that research and development go somewhere, that would allow our spacecraft to withstand and deflect huge amounts of radiation, away from critical systems and, of course, the crew of the craft. I am looking forward to that, because such a thing would remove one of the major stumbling blocks to extrasolar missions, leaving only the utterly pedestrian nature of our propulsion systems to sort out.




posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Ah the Io flux tube...

Yes, Io gets a lot of radiation from Jupiter, as well as being squeezed and kneaded like a doughball, driving its amazing amount of volcanism. Smashing little object, is Io. One of the most fascinating moons in our solar system, topped only by Europa in my opinion and only by way of Europa being a massive potential source of water in our solar system.

But in terms of Jupiter being deadly... Yes, even in proximity to the planet amounting to the orbit of some of its satellites, the planet outputs quite a staggering amount of ionising radiation. But it is only deadly if you do not account for it. Pretty soon (next couple of decades) plasma sheilding mechanisms will be coming on stream, and I do not suggest that because I am a sci fi geek (although I absolutely am one of those, without a doubt), but because research and testing on small scales has already begun, was actually begun in earnest last decade if I recall correctly. Some clever folks from Sheffield were looking into it, last I heard.

Assuming that research and development go somewhere, that would allow our spacecraft to withstand and deflect huge amounts of radiation, away from critical systems and, of course, the crew of the craft. I am looking forward to that, because such a thing would remove one of the major stumbling blocks to extrasolar missions, leaving only the utterly pedestrian nature of our propulsion systems to sort out.



Firstly, thats fascinating. Never even heard of plasma shielding. Can you recommend a few links to read on those? If not, ill Google it, no problemo.

Secondly, i love that name "Io flux tube". Sounds badass. Which it is, bad for ones ass (and the rest)



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:20 PM
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Look at how STUNNING Europa is


www.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Here's a link...there are others, but you can get search terms for them them by looking into this!

physicsworld.com...

There was a video on one site, which I cannot currently find, which showed a target object (model of a spaceship) being blasted with energy, and having the energy deflected around it by arcane magicks (rudimentary plasma shield, roughly simulating the action of Earths magnetosphere, which protects us from the excessive radiation that the sun, and indeed the galaxy throws at us everyday).



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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Everything about space exploration just pisses me off because I know they already have a meta-civilisation out there with technology that would make our space shuttles and probes look like the work of kids. It always just makes me think we're out there pretending, "Ooh, what a cool discovery.. our rover took some photographs of some intriguing rocks". There's nothing exciting or interesting about it.. It's just another reminder of how much money we waste on obsolete technology and of how gullible most people are.

To be excited about this kind of stuff you either have to be some kind of buff or you have to be ignorant of the evidence of ET visitation. A false dilemma maybe but this whole current paradigm of space exploration is founded on actively ignoring mountains of evidence. In a World without a truth embargo where people were truly objective and not conditioned these realities would be readily acknowledged. Why would I be excited about rocks and other boring stuff when I know ET's are already visiting our planet? Acknowledge these realities and bring us disclosure or shut up!

Sorry for being a downer, I get a kick from being a cynical ass.. unhealthy? I know, I know..



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Here's a link...there are others, but you can get search terms for them them by looking into this!

physicsworld.com...

There was a video on one site, which I cannot currently find, which showed a target object (model of a spaceship) being blasted with energy, and having the energy deflected around it by arcane magicks (rudimentary plasma shield, roughly simulating the action of Earths magnetosphere, which protects us from the excessive radiation that the sun, and indeed the galaxy throws at us everyday).


Great stuff, thanks mate, bedtime reading tonight.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Hey now Jupiter has taken many bullets for Earth in the form of asteroids and comets.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

You are right, Europa is a gorgeous looking object.

And I hope you enjoy your reading!



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 08:39 PM
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originally posted by: TheLaughingGod
Everything about space exploration just pisses me off because I know they already have a meta-civilisation out there with technology that would make our space shuttles and probes look like the work of kids. It always just makes me think we're out there pretending, "Ooh, what a cool discovery.. our rover took some photographs of some intriguing rocks". There's nothing exciting or interesting about it.. It's just another reminder of how much money we waste on obsolete technology and of how gullible most people are.

To be excited about this kind of stuff you either have to be some kind of buff or you have to be ignorant of the evidence of ET visitation. A false dilemma maybe but this whole current paradigm of space exploration is founded on actively ignoring mountains of evidence. In a World without a truth embargo where people were truly objective and not conditioned these realities would be readily acknowledged. Why would I be excited about rocks and other boring stuff when I know ET's are already visiting our planet? Acknowledge these realities and bring us disclosure or shut up!

Sorry for being a downer, I get a kick from being a cynical ass.. unhealthy? I know, I know..



There is zero evidence if alien visitation. But that's off topic



posted on Jun, 17 2016 @ 12:34 PM
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I don't want to sound like that guy that says "yeah but the book is better" but here I am.
Sorry.
The movie is in my top 5 best SF flick.
But the book... oh my... It brings you to the very core of Jupiter, explores Europa "underice" ocean and fauna, introduces a new competitor in the space race (no spoilers) and much more.
So mesmerizing. It is my favorite SF novel.
After watching the movie, you should (if you haven't done so far) read the book 2010.
I highly recommend it


Oh, and Jupiter is our friend. Or more like a bouncer that you shouldn't tickle.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: SolidGoal
I don't want to sound like that guy that says "yeah but the book is better" but here I am.
Sorry.
The movie is in my top 5 best SF flick.
But the book... oh my... It brings you to the very core of Jupiter, explores Europa "underice" ocean and fauna, introduces a new competitor in the space race (no spoilers) and much more.
So mesmerizing. It is my favorite SF novel.
After watching the movie, you should (if you haven't done so far) read the book 2010.
I highly recommend it


Oh, and Jupiter is our friend. Or more like a bouncer that you shouldn't tickle.


You know, i always wanted to read th book. I will now. Thanks. I enjoyd 3010, although it was quite trippy.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 11:31 AM
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I wonder why there are no photos of the approach to jupiter like we had of Pluto



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
I wonder why there are no photos of the approach to jupiter like we had of Pluto

I think the reason (or at least one of the reasons) is that Juno has a wide-field camera, and at this distance Jupiter will look like a dot or a very small circle.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Late to the show, but no, you're not the only one who appreciates the sheer beauty of orbital mechanics rendered into a graphic.


Lagrangian points have become somewhat more measurable, and largely support the thesis that Jupiter (and other massive bodies) have and will 'protect' the inner planets from destruction. Of course, a few slip by. Someday, an ELE-type object will likely slip by. In the meantime, a hearty "Thank you" to Jupiter.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

So, rather than post lots of links, ill open up the floor, lets discuss our big friendly bully of a planet keeping us relatively safe from harm.
What are you guys expecting or oping to see from the Juno mission?

It would be interesting to see if there is a moonlet within the red storm.

en.m.wikipedia.org...

Also being a attractor planet that basically has the ability to attract "incoming" SOLSystem celestial objects and or debris it makes sense that some form of electromagnetic actions / activities are or may be going on with JUPITER and its near and maybe even distant celestial objects, as its storm may generate static functions that may effect it's surroundings...

NAMASTE*******



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: 3danimator2014
I wonder why there are no photos of the approach to jupiter like we had of Pluto

I think the reason (or at least one of the reasons) is that Juno has a wide-field camera, and at this distance Jupiter will look like a dot or a very small circle.


Well that makes sense, but that begs the question...how big would jupiter be to a human travelling on board Juno, at this point in the journey, a few weeks away from its target.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Convert "a few weeks" to miles and the answer is pretty easy to obtain.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: 3danimator2014
I read the title and was all ready to defend Jupiter. W/O that big chunk of gas , we would probably not be here . Think Shoemaker- Levy . If Jupiter was an evil planet and let it bypass that immense gravitational field...possibility no more life and 1/2 a planet here .

If you are going to watch 2010 , you have to watch 2001 first . And thanks for an idea for me on tonight's entertainment.




Not every chunk of rock heading for earth has to pass by Jupiter, what if Jupiter is on the other side of the solar system to earth when a mountain comes calling? as in sixty five million years ago?



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Convert "a few weeks" to miles and the answer is pretty easy to obtain.



So it would be fairly large? Which is what i thought, which is why im suprised there are no "approach" photos.

i guess we know what Jup looks like, so there is no need for the dramatic increases in res like there was with Pluto.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: pikestaff

originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: 3danimator2014
I read the title and was all ready to defend Jupiter. W/O that big chunk of gas , we would probably not be here . Think Shoemaker- Levy . If Jupiter was an evil planet and let it bypass that immense gravitational field...possibility no more life and 1/2 a planet here .

If you are going to watch 2010 , you have to watch 2001 first . And thanks for an idea for me on tonight's entertainment.




Not every chunk of rock heading for earth has to pass by Jupiter, what if Jupiter is on the other side of the solar system to earth when a mountain comes calling? as in sixty five million years ago?


Then pucker up baby and kiss your ass goodbye?



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