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Australian Rodent Is First Mammal to Go Extinct Due to Climate Change, Scientists Say

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posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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Being a fan of all things RODENT, this article leaves me feeling sad. I'm not here to argue for/against the reality of climate change, just to provide information about another form of life that has vanished from this planet. I wonder if DNA could be used to "resurrect" a species that has become extinct?

According to The New York Times:


Australian researchers say rising sea levels have wiped out a rodent that lived on a tiny outcrop in the Great Barrier Reef, in what they say is the first documented extinction of a mammal species due to man-made climate change. The rodent was known to have lived only on Bramble Cay, a minuscule atoll in the northeast Torres Strait, between Cape York Peninsula in the Australian state of Queensland and the southern shores of Papua New Guinea. The long-tailed, whiskered creature, called the Bramble Cay melomys, is considered the only mammal endemic to the Great Barrier Reef.


The article continues:


“The key factor responsible for the death of the Bramble Cay melomys is almost certainly high tides and surging seawater, which has traveled inland across the island,” Luke Leung, a scientist from the University of Queensland who was an author of a report on the species’ apparent disappearance, said by telephone. “The seawater has destroyed the animal’s habitat and food source.”




Bramble Cay melomys

SOURCE ARTICLE

This is indeed a Fragile Earth.



edit on 6142016 by seattlerat because: added a link




posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: seattlerat
A link to the article might be helpful, so we could read about the connection between the surging tides/seawater and climate change.
I think that other mammals have gone extinct due to climate change before this.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Added link at bottom of post - thanks!

I did find this part of the article hopeful:


There is a small possibility that the rodents may yet be discovered in some parts of Papua New Guinea, Dr. Leung said. Scientists are not sure how the animals first arrived at Bramble Cay, but they theorize that they may have floated there on driftwood or arrived in sailing vessels.

edit on 6142016 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)


they did also proclaim:


Dr. Leung said one reason the report was released so long after the research was conducted was to verify that it was the first such extinction due to climate change caused by humans. He said the scientists “collected data, looked extensively at other research and left no stone unturned” before making that assertion.

edit on 6142016 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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How did the dinosaurs die then? Cancer?

This is just more propaganda. Don't feed into it.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:00 AM
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How did the dinosaurs die then? Cancer?

This is just more propaganda. Don't feed into it.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: seattlerat

And why this is a problem? I can think of all kinds of insects I would like to go extinct.

This is like that mess with the minnow and the dam.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:13 AM
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Man made climate change or just natural climate change
One small cay gets hit by a wave surge and its climate change

Sorry, just find it a little odd



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:21 AM
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Survival of the fittest I'm afraid..

I would have a different outlook if this was by direct human interactions for example the dodo.. But if this animal wasn't able to spread and survive in other locations then it is just nature at work..
edit on 14/6/16 by Misterlondon because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:25 AM
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Just because it's only known to live on that spot doesn't mean it doesn't live elsewhere just that it's unknown. There are still undiscovered species and remote undiscovered or undocumented places, maybe the critters are there but it's just unknown to 'science'.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: GraffikPleasure
How did the dinosaurs die then? Cancer?

This is just more propaganda. Don't feed into it.

possibly cancer, more than likely an asteroid are super volcano.

what propaganda is being displayed here?



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: seattlerat

It seems a bit singular this piece of carpet bagging, why haven’t some islands like Heron, Lady Musgrave, and Green Island started to gurgle.
Why are they building a new airport in The Maldives? why would there be sea level differentials for atolls and reefs...in fact reefs themselves usually stay atop the water because of near surface coral preference.
Also you could ask is there any tipping down effect from post glacial rebound in those areas......



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: seattlerat

Maybe you should look at it this way...rising sea levels cutting off the atoll from any other lands with larger predators (or however they got there, like the driftwood theory), probably allowed this animal to thrive for quite a while where it may have otherwise been naturally hunted to extinction elsewhere. Seems like "luck" may have just prolonged the inevitable.

That's just a thought...don't be sad, as it appears this was not a heavy player in the natural circle of life, and I highly doubt that the earth will be dramatically affected in any major way.

Also, I would be willing to bet that there were some (if not many) mammals in the history of the earth that went extinct due to localized changes in their habitat.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: stinkelbaum

The climate change farce.

...to add, how much "resesrch" was done to see what other factors could have contributed or actually were the reason.

Plus, is it even extinct... Scientists are not benevolent.

Adding that this was due to climate change automatically has me wonder if this is a game of my scientist can beat up your scientist.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: GraffikPleasure

As far as I know, dinosaurs and insects are not mammals- also, if you read the article, this has to do with climate change from human civilization. Sometimes READING post/source might be useful before posting.
edit on 6142016 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: johnnyjoe1979

did you read the article? It has been suggested that some examples may yet be found because they could have escaped on a piece of drift-wood...



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: seattlerat

I disagree with the entire climate change premise. In fact I already said that in another post on this thread (right above your post I'm replying to BTW). Read the thread maybe?

BTW, I'm pretty sure there were rodents in prehistoric times. Did they die out due to man made climate change?

I reiterate, the entire premise to me, is bogus. I'm sure there are others factors at play



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: seattlerat
a reply to: johnnyjoe1979

did you read the article? It has been suggested that some examples may yet be found because they could have escaped on a piece of drift-wood...


It does say that about the rodents first arriving at bramble bay, I'm not sure that the two sentences are connected though, they may have just been remotely observed long ago in PNG

"There is a small possibility that the rodents may yet be discovered in some parts of Papua New Guinea, Dr. Leung said. "

"Scientists are not sure how the animals first arrived at Bramble Cay, but they theorize that they may have floated there on driftwood or arrived in sailing vessels".
I agree that this is being pushed as AGW.

To note: around 2007,

The small population size and the naturally unstable nature of Bramble Cay has led to the species
being listed as ‘Endangered’ under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity
Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and ‘Endangered’ under the Queensland Nature Conservation Act
1992 (NCA).

Some of these observations go way back to the 90's furthermore, there was inbreeding observed making the species liable to extinction.

Also,
Impacts associated with climate change,

Although no specific assessment of this threat has been undertaken, the likely consequences of
climate change, including sea-level rise and increase in the frequency and intensity of tropical storms
are unlikely to have any major impact on the survival of the Bramble Cay melomys in the life of this
plan. However, the shallow nature of the island and reef environment makes Torres Strait potentially
vulnerable to the effects of climate change, including loss of land through sea level rise and
subsequent flooding and coastal erosion, and changes to habitat and species composition (Torres
Strait NRM Reference Group 2005). Unusual or changing weather patterns in the area resulting in
stronger winds, large storm surges and extremely high tides, possibly due to climate change may
impact on a number of species (e.g. green turtles, seabirds and the melomys) that inhabit and/or use
the island over time.
Not even a word about AGW then.
www.environment.gov.au...

edit on 14-6-2016 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: seattlerat

Mate, I've got to say that is that story is a festering pile of bollocks.

I'll give you two simple facts;

1+1 does not equal 3

&

An absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

No rats exist on the island anymore, must be man made climate change. What ? Eh? HTF does that work ?

Just because they no longer exist on that sand bar, does not mean they are extinct. Because as the relative bodies have all stated, they don't know how they got there or where they come from.

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: smurfy

Thanks for a well written and informative post- I agree, the two sentences are probably not connected- I misread it. My primary reason for posting this information was because of my love of small furry mammals, mainly rodents. I don't want to become embroiled in arguments for/against climate change being man-made/natural. Scientists make mistakes... and so do I. I am certainly not an expert in ANY field, so I have tried to avoid making any statement that would suggest this.

Thanks for everyone's comments. I realize most people either don't care about rats or have a strong aversion to them... So, I did not expect anyone else to share my view that (possibly) losing this creature is a sad event.




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