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How to Prepare For a Tsunami

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posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 06:17 AM
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From: TRUTH SURVIVAL
Survival Reviews & Tutorials For Newbies!

David * March 19 2016

[BTW, I made an extensive search to see if already posted]

[BoX: I'm somewhat skeptical about how much prepping for a Tsunami can help how much in many locations--e.g. the coast of Oregon, Coos Bay etc. However, if one can't move, prepping as much as possible has to be better than doing nothing at all.]

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www.truthsurvival.com...
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Practice Evacuation Routes Beforehand [bold in original and was also red in original]
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As the old saying goes, “It’s better to have something and not need it, than need it and not have it”. Even if you never experience a tsunami in your lifetime, it’s still in your best interest to practice evacuation routes. Practicing will tell you how long it will take to reach your safety spot. It will also show you alternate routes in the event that your route is jammed or impassable. You can’t fully learn how to prepare for a tsunami without practicing your evacuation routes.
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Build an Emergency Kit
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Build three separate emergency kits- one for your car, one for your home, and one for work. You want to have one available no matter where you are (a survival kit does you no good if you can’t get to it). As a general rule of thumb, I would advise packing your kit with a minimum of 72 hours’ worth of goods. Here’s a list to help you get started:
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Recognizing The Signs
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Warn Others And Get to Safety
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Finding “Natural” Higher Ground
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As a general rule of thumb, I would advise finding “natural” higher ground (like a hill or mountain). Why? Because small buildings may crumble due to the force of the tsunami’s waves. You may be thinking, “There’s no way tsunamis are powerful enough to knock down buildings!” I thought so too, until I saw the following picture:
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As you can see, a four-story concrete building lies on its side after the March 11th, 2011 tsunami that hit Japan. For the longest time, experts recommended getting inside concrete buildings during a tsunami. But as it turns out, even this can make you vulnerable. Granted, if there’s nowhere else to go and you’ve got seconds to react, go inside a building. However, if you have time to fully prepare and evacuate, choose natural higher ground instead- mountains, hills, etc. This is a super-important tip to remember when learning how to prepare for a tsunami.
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If You're Caught in the Current
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[4 sources listed]
1. TSUNAMIS
www.ready.gov...
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2. KIT STORAGE LOCATIONS
www.ready.gov...
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3. TSUNAMI PREPAREDNESS (NOAA)
www.tsunami.noaa.gov...
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4. CWARN
cwarn.org...
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When I read the title, recalling the Bandeh Acheh Tsunami, I thought--"Yeah, right--a lot of good prepping would do!" . . . However, there are rational things that can be done to increase one's CHANCES of survival.
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I'm high above sea level in the U.S. Southwest. However, I have loved ones on the coast in California, Oregon and Washington State.
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In this era, imho, anytime one is on the coast for whatever reason, it would be wise to scope out the terrain and know where the highest ground is and how to quickly get there.
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I think the advice about being caught in the current is good. It's not wise to just throw in the towel and assume one 'has' to drown. Do what you can. I grew up on a major river. I was taught to go with the flow and it will likely kick you out to a safer location. If necessary, swim laterally, perpendicularly to the force trapping you. etc.
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Anyway--FWIW. Be safe, out there, folks. Life can be hazardous!
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And . . . none of us have the promise of tomorrow alive . . . being ready to meet God is always wise.
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posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 06:34 AM
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Im prepared



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Uhhhhh, I don't think that's very adequate. LOL.

Though, if those were all I had, I'd sure put them on in a hurry.



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

They are better than nothing if you are hit by a mile-high wave of water.Going at the speed of sound.😃



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 08:07 AM
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I thought about building my front porch with pontoons under it and a quick release from the rest of the house, but my kids thought it was a super crazy idea.

I live below Shasta Lake dam and also Whiskey Lake Dam in N. California. So, if there is a major quake, Im going to regret not putting in the pontoons. lol



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 08:20 AM
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"How to Prepare For a Tsunami"

Move to North Texas!!!

Come for the lack of tsunamis, stay for the tornadoes!!!

Y'all are welcome

-Christosterone



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

Is super crazy actually meaning "really good idea"?
I think that's brilliant, although it might only be good with rising flood waters, rather than a tidal wave.
Living below a dam though, I think I'd definitely want something floatable...



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 10:27 AM
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Perhaps Trump can build a wall to Keep the illegal Tsunami's out along with the Mexicans.




edit on 12-6-2016 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

DOODNESS!

And the volcano to boot!

May God be with you all.

I would NOT trade you places!



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: Christosterone

& Chiggers?

& Sandstorms?



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: snowspirit

That survival ball posted about recently comes to mind.

A big one!



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 02:06 PM
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There are two ways to prepare.
Settle on high ground.
Or tuck into a ball and stick your head between your legs so you can kiss your ass goodbye.



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
There are two ways to prepare.
Settle on high ground.
Or tuck into a ball and stick your head between your legs so you can kiss your ass goodbye.


Probably toooooo true.

Though that survival ball thing looked to be very good at enabling survival of a lot of flood type disasters.

I need to look up that link . . . Here it is:
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www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 05:18 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

2 volcanos,, Im a little south of Shasta and a little west of Lassen. And I live on the Sacramento River. Sometimes I wonder what the H%#l Im thinking.



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: misskat1
a reply to: BO XIAN

2 volcanos,, Im a little south of Shasta and a little west of Lassen. And I live on the Sacramento River. Sometimes I wonder what the H%#l Im thinking.


Understandable to wonder that!

Do you have any other viable options? Sounds beautiful . . . but at huge risk.



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 07:24 PM
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How to survive a tsumani?

Don't live near zones that are at risk for tsunami's

Boom!



posted on Jun, 12 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Got that covered . . . thousands of feet above sea level in a high desert.

You?



posted on Jun, 13 2016 @ 12:13 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

what,the Tsunamistan's are terrorists too?



posted on Jun, 13 2016 @ 12:23 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Not sure. I know that my area wasn't flooded during the 64' quake up here.

That was a magnitude 9.2 and caused tsunamis ... but not here. The ocean isn't terribly far away though, and I'm probably only 100-200 ft. above sea level.

The geography of where I live, Anchorage doesn't really allow for tsunamis:



We're kind of sheltered from the ocean.
edit on 13-6-2016 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2016 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Sounds good.

I gather . . . from looking at your and a larger map . . . that the inlet to that bay that Anchorage is on--the inlet is not at a "good" angle for most likely tsunami's to travel up the bay with much umph left. Is that right?

Though there have been some interesting 5.X? quakes in that bay, IIRC. At least 3.X.

A big one in the bay could mess your day up pretty well, I'd guess.

Thankfully, there doesn't seem to be a huge fault in the bay, that I recall.

Thanks for your kind reply.



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