It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

FBI wants access to Internet browser history without a warrant in terrorism and spy cases

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:13 PM
link   
Law makers are pushing through legislation that would allow the FBI to obtain electronic communication transnational records using an administrative subpoena know as a national security letter. A Natioanl Security Letter (NSL) is issued by the federal government for the purpose of gathering information for national security and doesn't not require the approval from a judge. The NSL's also contain a nondisclosure which prevents the recipient from disclosing that he FBI has requested information.

The Washington Post


The Obama administration is seeking to amend surveillance law to give the FBI explicit authority to access a person’s Internet browser history and other electronic data without a warrant in terrorism and spy cases.

The administration made a similar effort six years ago but dropped it after concerns were raised by privacy advocates and the tech industry.

FBI Director James B. Comey has characterized the legislation as a fix to “a typo” in the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which he says has led some tech firms to refuse to provide data that Congress intended them to provide.


Arstechnica


On Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee is set to vote on one of those provisions as an amendment to a bill called the Electronic Communications Privacy Act Amendments Act of 2015 (S. 356). The provision would allow NSLs to target "account number, login history, length of service (including start date)… Internet Protocol address… routing, or transmission information…" and more.

This amendment is authored by Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), and it's being tacked on to a pending Senate bill. If passed, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act Amendments Act of 2015 would mandate a warrant for the government to access e-mail and data stored online. (The House unanimously passed its companion version, known as the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, in April 2016.)


The Electronic Frontier Foundation has a page all about National Security Letters including a FAQ




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:19 PM
link   
The NSA already has all of this- the FBI wants unrestricted access to it what they have.

By the time the american public sees what their government is up to, it will be too late to do anything short of rioting in the streets.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:19 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAmazingYeti

Don't be fooled, they already have access and have used it. This is nothing more than c.y.a. at work.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:32 PM
link   
a reply to: TheAmazingYeti

Right, this is their typical MO: ask permission for something theyre already doing but more importantly, why?

Why are they so scared of getting a warrant?

Why are they desperately trying to avoid oversight?

You have evidence or reason to believe that someone is up to no good, go to a judge, present your evidence and get your warrant.

Simple.

"But sometimes they need do it immediately, time is of the essence!"

Ok, then require the warrant retroactively. And if the judge denies the warrant then disclose your activity and compensate the individual or Party.

Stop trying to operate in secrecy under this BS excuse of "fighting terror".



edit on 7-6-2016 by gladtobehere because: wording



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: lordcomac
The NSA already has all of this- the FBI wants unrestricted access to it what they have.

By the time the american public sees what their government is up to, it will be too late to do anything short of rioting in the streets.


Taking it to the press, letting the public know about it helps and may stop it. Though, watch for it being added into a bill that the congress doesn't read until it's signed.




top topics
 
4

log in

join