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Got a CNC Job starting Monday, Quiting flooring installers job

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posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Thanks and my initial experience with the owners was fantastic they are very nice people.




posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

ONLY 22 an hour?? Thats damn good money for an average! I'm in AZ,so there are a lot of cnc jobs here,rate runs 18-20 an hour,with skills and tools.A part changer may make 10-12.Knowing code,programming,some simple engineering knowledge will make you indispensible,but going from one career to another,you may not learn enough quick enough.I've been running machines since I was 15,managed shops,ran my own,bid jobs,lathes and mills.Its a long way to become proficient,sorry to say.But all the best for you.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: blkcwbyhat

appreciate and ill be taking 12 credit hours for a manufacturing and engineering course thats cnc related per semester
edit on 6/6/2016 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Do it. Not many CNC operatives about. Once you learn the software you can apply it to various machines such as lasers and plasma cutters too. You'll also learn about tech / engineers /design drawings if you don't know already. Go for it. So many industries you can work for too.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
OK guys looking for some alternative perspective from people in construction and CNC.

I am considering leaving the flooring job for a new career in CNC for more stable working conditions.

However I'm really curious what you think.

I'll be making a little less money to start but I think there's potential to advance quickly A because of my work ethic and drive and B because I am detail oriented and skilled in math and logic.

My problem with flooring is that it's hard on my body and it's very feast or famine.

Flooring is very tough. Tile is terrible hardwoods are way easier than they usedd to ee but the up and down and knee and wrist compression still sucks.

Entry CNC will be basic machine operation and feeding parts through. You will eventually learn the processes and programming if that's what you want to do. Take every opportunity to take classes or training courses in software and machining.

I have done furniture making, remodelling, cab install, and production guitar making. When I made guitars I worked with CNC machinists daily as well as ran basic operations and laser cutters. It's good blue collar money once you become an asset to the company. Which is doing good work,jeeping production moving and understanding the process and material enough to solve or prevent malfunction issues. Running 1000 of the wrong part can be a real bummer. As you gain more responsibility the magnitude of your errors can be very devastating for production. Seeing problems before they happen is very useful commodity for a manufacturer.
edit on 6-6-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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Go for it! Head on. 3-5 years from now you will have a good CNC skill set and that will always provide you with a decent income. And if you can get an OK income until your skill sets develop then what you got to lose. In the future it will open up all sorts of possibilities. CNC technology and next gen will be around for a long while yet.
If you get chance to learn an get experience with other machines like lathes, millers, boring machines etc etc then grab it. The more rounded you become the more valuable you are and the more you will earn/demand.

Good Luck
CEng guy



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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Honestly, when I was younger I did both jobs, flooring and then later machinist. My neighbor offered me a job as a machinist because I was always a computer guru, and enjoyed 3D modeling and CAD work, and of course engines and cars. He saw potential.

The machine work got boring real fast.. I mean real fast. Changing tooling bits, and parts, and pressing play on the machine and just waiting and watching to be sure nothing goes terribly wrong.... so boring. I was only there to put the raw metal in, take the finished piece out, and measure it to make sure it is within specified tolerances. I was just another cog in the machine. Soon to be replaced by robots.

I never got the chance to do the CAD and programming (officially), which is pretty much the same thing these days, because I was so bored before I got to that point.

I say forget all that mess, and start learning computer science and software engineering. We need people to program the robots that will take away everyone's jobs. That is what I do now, not looking back.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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I have a job in property pres and make great money. I may work 10 hours a week and make over 70 a year. Easy chump change.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 06:24 PM
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I will say though, CNC machinist is definitely a step up from flooring. But you will be stuck in a machine shop all day, no more driving to random houses and flirting with the stay at home MILFS.
edit on 6-6-2016 by WeAre0ne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: MEDIKATED

whats property pres?



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: WeAre0ne




I say forget all that mess, and start learning computer science and software engineering. We need people to program the robots that will take away everyone's jobs. That is what I do now, not looking back.


Already know to many software engineers who cant find work making more than 40k a year unless they move to Cali or Austin.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Good move!
Good luck!



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

We were always looking for hard surface installers. I had a lot of guys who only did carpet which has been in decline sales wise since hardwood took the lead even for kitchen floors. Laminates were popular as a cheap alternative to hardwood but I didn't really like to recommend it for areas that might get wet. I sold very little VCT and didn't stock any as these tended to be more commercial than residential. We ran a residential design center as my hubby built and installed custom cabinetry.
We sold the business in 2014..



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: WeAre0ne

you had to find a flaw in the system...Maybe they have a smoking hot secratary...



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

onequestion, we've had many friends in construction and one still a machinist (extruding, pressing, specialized parts), so I say Go For IT! Yay! You might find it giving you a long future in an area you find job satisfaction. Best Wishes!



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 03:14 PM
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First day on a lathe successfully ran 80 parts
Not anywhere near as hard as I was expecting measured and qc'd all my own parts

Not bad huh



posted on Jun, 14 2016 @ 08:20 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Yay!......

Yay!..... and Congratulations!



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Just don't get ur sleeve caught in the chuck



posted on Jun, 15 2016 @ 08:19 PM
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a reply to: lavatrance

haha



posted on Jun, 20 2016 @ 05:43 PM
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I don't know if it's just me but running the lathe is easy I understand how to offset and change parts and everything.

When does it start becoming more complicated




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