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Kids tested material from Roswell UFO debris, claims witness

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posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Blackfinger
if it was a high speed crash then the damage area would have been a lot of smaller debris..Here is an F111 crash site,high speed..
Guyra Crash


That may not be necessarily true!

The F111 hit at an high-oblique angle and literally disintegrated!

Based upon "Eyewitness" reports on both of the 1947 Corona and
Roswell crash sites, there is supposed evidence to suggest the
UFO craft SKIPPED like a bouncing ball and the areas of impact
damage were BOTH as long as a full mile or more!

Like I said earlier SOMEONE must have some of the debris
in their possession as a family heirloom hand-me-down
from probably one of the soldiers who were part of the
crash site cleanup crew!

I can test it here so U2U me and I can put a date on it
and even do a full chromatograph test on it to find
out its full elemental composition.

One TV crew somehow supposedly recovered a
"plastic piece" from the Corona crash site and
had it tested and found out it was HDPE
(High Density PolyEthylene) which is fine
except that ONE of the dating tests done on
the item indicated the sample came from between
1940 to 1950 (I won't say the date more accurately
so as to not tip my hand as to just how accurate
the dating technique I will be using really is!)
HDPE Polyethylene wasn't invented until the
late 50's/Early 1960's!

So what does THAT tell you?!




posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: StargateSG7
(I won't say the date more accurately
so as to not tip my hand as to just how accurate
the dating technique I will be using really is!)



So what does THAT tell you?!

That you're full of it.
edit on 7/5/2016 by AdmireTheDistance because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: StargateSG7

I think you are quite accurate with your important and well made points.

Of course, the narrow, rigid, super biased, willfully blind naysayers will ever acknowledge their addiction so idolatrously to never risking a false positive sooooo intensely that they make being victimized by a false negative--SCIENTIFICALLY--a virtual certainty.

I, too, think that there must be bits and pieces holed away in attics, chests, boxes . . . that relatives are clueless about. Time will tell if they will surface before the critters decide to disclose themselves massively.



posted on Jul, 5 2016 @ 11:54 PM
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a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

Uhhhhh . . . your omniscient smugness is leaking all over the place, . . . again.

I gather you had no edifying contribution to make.



posted on Jul, 6 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance

originally posted by: StargateSG7
(I won't say the date more accurately
so as to not tip my hand as to just how accurate
the dating technique I will be using really is!)



So what does THAT tell you?!

That you're full of it.


====

I have access to SERIOUS FORENSIC GEAR at this company!!!!

Let's see....we've got a 400 AMD S9150 GPU Cluster (1.2 PetaFLOPS),
A gas chromatograph or three, CNC and Electron beam machining systems
up the yin yang, high dextrous robotic arms that can lift 26,000 lbs,
two electron microscopes, 100,000 FPS super slo mo cameras,
A whole chem lab! a CMOS CPU production facility....anything
else I missed? This company is HUGE and I have access to almost
all of it's resources!

So YEAH I could do some serious Argon-Argon dating
or Potassium-Argon dating to find the age of the
materials themselves (i.e. were they heated/cooled
within a time period +/- 100/200 years) and then
use that REALLY FANCY ferric oxide magnetic-field
orientation method to get the dates down to +/- 5 years

WE HAVE A LOT OF REALLY SERIOUS GEAR!!!

So U2U me and I can get it done!



posted on Jul, 6 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar. Hadn't come into public use then, but it stands to reason the military had some to make balloons.

I use it for gift wrap. First time I bought it, people opening their gifts were amazed. It just flattened itself back out, no wrinkles and they were taking it to re-use. I keep re- using it lol it's harder to wrap with because you can't iron out corners to tape they keep popping back open lol

It's like a plastic metal. Tape peels right off it. So I think it was this material. Looks like aluminum but can't be crunched up. I think those helium gift balloons are made of it as well.

I've had some thicker than others. So I imagine this was a thicker sheet of it
edit on 6-7-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



If you google Mylar you will see images of a shiny metallic

" Mylar is often used to generically refer to polyester film or plastic sheet. However, it is a registered trademark owned by Dupont Tejjin Films for a specific family of plastic sheet products made from the resin Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)."
edit on 6-7-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: redmage

originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.

Was it reported that there were no creases or crinkles when it fattened back out? It may have been but I didn't see it.



posted on Jul, 12 2016 @ 01:04 PM
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I think it is Nitinol that's been alleged to
have been back engineered from the 1947 crash.



posted on Jul, 15 2016 @ 07:49 AM
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originally posted by: ZetaRediculian

originally posted by: redmage

originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.

Was it reported that there were no creases or crinkles when it fattened back out? It may have been but I didn't see it.


Yeah -- I'm not sure if I ever read that it retained no wrinkles or creases (although like you said, maybe I missed that part of the first-hand description), just that it unfolded back to its original shape.

If that was what it did, then a person who is accustomed to the properties of common household tin foil (e.g., when you crunch it into a ball, it stays in a ball), upon seeing metalized Mylar for the first time, or even plastic film of any kind for the first time, and seeing how it unfolds itself after being crunched into a ball, that person could describe it as "retaining its original shape" or "unfolding flat" -- even if it has some wrinkles and creases.

edit on 7/15/2016 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2016 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: Box of Rain

originally posted by: ZetaRediculian

originally posted by: redmage

originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.

Was it reported that there were no creases or crinkles when it fattened back out? It may have been but I didn't see it.


Yeah -- I'm not sure if I ever read that it retained no wrinkles or creases (although like you said, maybe I missed that part of the first-hand description), just that it unfolded back to its original shape.

If that was what it did, then a person who is accustomed to the properties of common household tin foil (e.g., when you crunch it into a ball, it stays in a ball), upon seeing metalized Mylar for the first time, or even plastic film of any kind for the first time, and seeing how it unfolds itself after being crunched into a ball, that person could describe it as "retaining its original shape" or "unfolding flat" -- even if it has some wrinkles and creases.


There have been so many stories told and retold that it becomes impossible to understand what really happened. a little detail like that could have been added on at any point in the last 70 years. But that is the way people imagine memory metal to be like plus alien metal doesn't get creases and since this was alien metal, there were no creases! I think that's the circularity.



posted on Jul, 15 2016 @ 04:51 PM
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I guess the quickest way to resolve the controversy would be to get an actual piece of the "object" that fell at Roswell and get it tested by a few independent labs.

Oh... we don't have any? Never mind.



posted on Jul, 17 2016 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: Box of Rain

originally posted by: ZetaRediculian

originally posted by: redmage

originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.

Was it reported that there were no creases or crinkles when it fattened back out? It may have been but I didn't see it.


Yeah -- I'm not sure if I ever read that it retained no wrinkles or creases (although like you said, maybe I missed that part of the first-hand description), just that it unfolded back to its original shape.

If that was what it did, then a person who is accustomed to the properties of common household tin foil (e.g., when you crunch it into a ball, it stays in a ball), upon seeing metalized Mylar for the first time, or even plastic film of any kind for the first time, and seeing how it unfolds itself after being crunched into a ball, that person could describe it as "retaining its original shape" or "unfolding flat" -- even if it has some wrinkles and creases.


---

In some of the original Jesse Marcel stories when he and his kids handled it,
they tried to CUT IT and burn it! Mylar contains plastic and will burn.
The ONLY material with the described type of shape memory and the
ability to withstand heat and cutting would be a metalized carbon
nanotube material. My guess for heat resistance would be
an aluminum oxide ceramic coating or MAYBE Boro-Nitride
onto multiple cross-wise layering of multiple Carbon nanotube
or graphene sheets.

I do know that HDPE (High Density PolyEthylene) was found
at BOTH the Roswell and Corona crash sites, but other than
that I can't find out where the other material went.
I am guessing though SOMEONE has a sample and
can send it to me here (U2U me!) for gas chromatographic
materials composition testing, magnetometric-orientation dating,
Argon-Argon and some other radio-nucleotide dating techniques.



posted on Jul, 21 2016 @ 01:59 AM
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originally posted by: redmage

originally posted by: violet
That 'metal' I believe is called Mylar.


Your theory seems unlikely.

Mylar can "flatten out"; however, after being crunched into a ball it still retains many creases and crinkles when it does "flatten" back out.


Depends on the thickness. I've had some really thin stuff where creases remain and thicker higher quality sheets that were wrinkle free. It's like a plastic.
For example; Ziploc bags are thicker than Glad and harder to crunch up!
edit on 21-7-2016 by violet because: (no reason given)



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