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BBC Presenter Signs Off ‘Inshallah’ On Flagship Debate Programme

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posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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A BBC presenter has signed off ‘Inshallah’ or ‘If Allah Wills It’ at the end of one of the organisation’s flagship, nationally televised debating programmes.

Nicky Campbell, the regular host of the Islam-heavy ‘The Big Questions’ was ending the programme discussing whether white, working-class boys discriminated against, and if the UK’s commitment to foreign aid be scrapped – when he dropped the line.

“We’re in Uxbridge next Sunday for a special asking ‘Are we facing the end of the world?'” he began, closing the show: “So we’ll see you then, Inshallah. For now, goodbye. Have a great Sunday”.

BBC Presenter Signs Off ‘Inshallah’ On Flagship Debate Programme

For those outside the UK.



The Big Questions is a faith and ethics television programme usually presented by Nicky Campbell. It is broadcast live on BBC One between 10:00am and 11:00am on Sunday, replacing The Heaven and Earth Show as the BBC's religious discussion programme.

The format is loosely based on BBC1's political discussion show, Question Time, though it also contains elements that are more familiar to daytime chat shows. In the first four series, each show featured four panellists from a range of different religious and ethical perspectives, as well as a number of contributors from the live studio audience. In Series 5, the panel was dropped, and the debates took place entirely within the audience, which still featured a number of contributors.

Each week, panel and audience debate three ethical, moral or religious topics which featured in the week's news.

Wikipedia


Having worked in several ME countries, I do know that Inshallah is used by Arabic Christians and Jews as well as Muslims. Saying that I find it odd that the BBC would do this. The UK is a predominantly an English-speaking country. Surely the addition of an English equivalent or better still a generic religious term would have been more suitable?





posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: Morrad

I don't suppose many people will notice.
Its a terrible programme. They say its designed to court controversy or spark debate (cause a fuss) but invariably comprises a bunch of whiners trying to convince you that they are the only special ones.

Weak, ineffective Sunday morning rubbish. Just TV I'm afraid.

Also, next week he'll probably say shalome or God save the Queen or whatever.
Its an inclusive programme so the language probably tries to reflect that.
edit on 5-6-2016 by Tulpa because: laziness first time round

edit on 5-6-2016 by Tulpa because: Spilling



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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It's a terrible program. I can barely get through an episode before turning it off. It's to frequently a platform for the mouthiest to peddle their own personal prejudice in the name of "debate".

I did watch a bit of today's show, The guy from loaded made some good points (As he does on the paper review on sky news).

I wouldn't read too much into Nicky Campbell's use of Inshallah though, it's a broadly religious program being pushed at Muslims and he just says what's on the teleprompter.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Morrad

"It is broadcast live on BBC One between 10:00am and 11:00am on Sunday, replacing The Heaven and Earth Show as the BBC's religious discussion programme. "

It is a religious discussion programme? Insha'allah means 'if God wills', he just used another language to say it. Don't be such a drama queen lol..



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: Morrad

Free speech unless you don't like it ya? SJW's sheesh.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Morrad

Yeah - that was on purpose

:-)

Whatever will you do?

God willing - you'll be able to move past this obvious insult to your identity...

Shalom



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:55 AM
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I thought "Inshallah" meant "never gonna happen" or "I'm not doing it". At least that was my experience from my time in Iraq.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: Tulpa
a reply to: SprocketUK

I have seen a few episodes in the past. When I read the news article this morning it came across as political pandering by the BBC. Perhaps I was mistaken. Too much red wine last night and a sore head this morning.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 11:04 AM
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Made me smile despite a sore head. I thought it was political pandering. Don't have a problem with the word. I was inclined to use Hamdallah in conversation while working in the ME.




edit on 5-6-2016 by Morrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: Morrad


A BBC presenter has signed off ‘Inshallah’ or ‘If Allah Wills It’ at the end of one of the organisation’s flagship, nationally televised debating programmes.



Inshallah actually means "if God wills it". I don't see why anyone would translate it partially. Allah means God. Not any one God in particular.
edit on 5-6-2016 by WeAre0ne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 04:22 PM
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Who cares??

Good godI am so fed up of this!

I wish people would just acsept that Muslims are now fully intergrated into western society and so long as they obey our laws who really cares if a TV presenter signs of with a Arabic saying, or heavens forbid a mayor with brown skin.

Just get over it and go find a new target for your prejudicial personality
edit on 5-6-2016 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-6-2016 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 05:46 PM
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a reply to: Morrad

Can't wait for the BBC to die..

Completely lost it's way.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 09:41 AM
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Considering it's the start of Ramadan, maybe it was a Ramadan greeting/blessing to Muslims. If so, I have no problem with it, just like I would have no problem with a non-jew giving a Passover greeting.

Can anyone tell me if "Inshallah" can be vaguely analogous to "God bless you", or if it is ever used as a greeting?



edit on 6/6/2016 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 10:59 AM
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Nothing wrong with it !

I mean, it's not like there is a global issue surrounding the pandering to religions.

Hail Satan.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: Parafitt
Nothing wrong with it !

I mean, it's not like there is a global issue surrounding the pandering to religions.

Hail Satan.


None but the old gods for Floki



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Morrad

Crap like this is simple said to provoke controversy, point of fact through, who really gives a damn as to how this Muppet decides to end the show?



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 01:03 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin



Just get over it and go find a new target for your prejudicial personality


As I stated in earlier posts yesterday (which you obviously missed), I had a hangover and a headache and I thought it was political pandering and subsequently acknowledged I was mistaken. I have many Muslim friends. I just find ingratiating behaviour repulsive.

Ironic that your knee-jerk reaction is the exact same thing dem Muslim haters get accused and condemned for.




edit on 6-6-2016 by Morrad because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: Box of Rain

Inshallah is mainly used when you are planning on doing something as far as I know.

There is a current Ramadan thread. Someone there maybe be able to answer your question.

Thread



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: Morrad

I guess Arabic is to the UK what Spanish is to the USA now. Our programming frequently includes bits of Spanish and Spanglish between the English nowadays. I don't really care for it even though it is my family language, because it makes my head hurt if I speak it for too long and much prefer English. But I understand it nonetheless.

I don't find it annoying enough to make it a thing though.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
Just get over it and go find a new target for your prejudicial personality


Or just get over it and then don't go do the second thing.





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