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Nine-Year-Old Banned From School After Trump Hat Makes Students Feel Bad

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posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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More and more compounding evidence to the fact that the modern left have become the Fascists of our time. It's a very dark road they are going down.




posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

I would have let him keep wearing it. Those kids that "feel bad" about a hat are the ones that need to get a grip. It's not like 9 year olds need much of a reason to argue about something anyway.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian
Believe it or not , it was just a few years ago when my nieces came home talking about how great Obama was and he was going to do great things. Apparently the schools do get the children of this age in to political discussions. They even had a mock election which Obama of course.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

What an asinine statement.

Children look up to their heroes. You're in no position to decide who kids can and can't look up to. This kid just met Trump, shook his hand, a big moment for him. You don't have to agree with him liking Trump but the idea him wearing his Trump hat is a publicity stunt is about as ridiculous an argument as someone can make.

Is wearing a Raiders shirt or a Lakers hat or an Obama hat or Jordan shoes also a publicity stunt? Or rather, is it just young kids looking up to their idols?
edit on 5-6-2016 by MysticPearl because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 07:57 PM
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There is this weird trend of people that were once far left swinging back to the centre. Kind of like in American History where Eddie Norton's character goes to prison and starts seeing the hypocrisy and bull# small-minded views of his fellow white supremacists. I know people from the Tumblr left who are now beginning to see just how ridiculous their movement has become and are starting to bail out.
This whole overly PC movement is actually starting to implode upon itself, it has effectively come down to "If you don't agree with our collective opinion, you are setting progress back and perpetuating hate speech"
Free Speech is only what they have decided it to be.
Personally, I don't care for Trump but this is stupid.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 08:20 PM
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Look at how people here are so distracted by this stupid story. If its even remotely truthful, then consider how disruptive this is to learning. You're adults and you can't stop talking about this crap. I can't imagine how annoying and disruptive all of this is. They should be focused on their education. Grow up people.

And people commenting about the kids going after their classmate for the Trump hat. They're children you disgusting freaks. Wtf is wrong with some of you? Calling children gazelles who don't do too well in the real world? You're pitiful.



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:10 PM
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Im glad they didnt beat him too



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 11:55 PM
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Personally, I believe children should be exposed to the political process as early as they can effectively understand it. That way they can have meaningful and thoughtful conversations with thought provoking counterpoints.

Parents don't sit in school with their children everyday and who knows what these so-called "teachers" are filling their minds with besides the basic curriculum. I think as parents, not only is it our responsibility to instill ethics, morals, and discipline, but to also have discussions relative to the process and their benefits and consequences.

Seems these days, that discussion is apparently one sided most times. I would like my child to hear an idea or line of thinking and be interested in countering it or seeing it for what it is. We assume this can only happen at a certain age. Back a hundred or more years ago, boys were considered men at the age of 11 or 12. What's happened since then??

Too long have we allowed schools, daycare's, and the worst of the bunch: TELEVISIONS to raise our kids. Look around, read the news... It's all about FEELINGS and making everyone comfortable. The middleclass parents are so busy trying to make ends meet, I can see why.

To deny or condemn parents for having the time to have these very important discussions with their children is indicative of those that want only their side addressed. What better way to control the direction of a country than to start "molding" our youth as soon as possible.

I commend parents who send their kids to school with a toolbox rather than an open slate.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 01:07 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: IAMTAT


What they've done is lie to their child and told him that he had a First Amendment right to wear whatever he wanted to school and this is simply not true. It's not true now. It wasn't true 5 years ago, 10 years ago, 25 years ago, 50 years ago, 100 years ago, or in 1776, 1781 or 1791.



Whole lot of hot air you're blowing there. And, how exactly to you know they did this? I'd love to know what type of spy equipment you have. You did read the part where it says


(Students at Powers-Ginsburg Elementary School are normally allowed to wear hats.)
right?

A hat that says "Make America Great Again". Lets use your logic for a moment..I doubt very many of the other 8 year olds understood the hat's reference. So I can only conclude that it's the school staff that got upset and are trying to hide behind children. What a disgusting display of cowardice.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 01:16 AM
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originally posted by: thesaneone
What was it that was said about the girls complaining about the large trans women in the restroom??? Oh yea the other kids are just going to have to deal with it.

Got to love the logic from the left.


Right?

A man can pee in the same restroom as little girls, but a little boy can't wear a hat.

*does a daffy duck woo hoo dance*



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

He was able to wear the hat for several days. It eventually caused some type of disruption. The school told him he couldn't wear it at that point. That is fully within the right of the school to do. For any article of clothing.

Warning: PDF
School Handbook

The dress code is on page 40. It is mentioned at least twice, that even if something is not specifically mentioned as being prohibited, that if it causes a distraction or undue attention to the wearer, then it is not allowed. The student will be asked to change or remove it.

This policy is about the same across the board, at any school.



edit on 6-6-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: introvert
If the school allows students to wear hats, as the OP indicates, then he should be able to wear the hat. Only if the hat is completely inappropriate should they be asked to take it off.

But the other aspect about this is the comments he made to the press.

What a poor, brainwashed little child.

The Right Wing propaganda machine deserves a medal.


I would say that the same can be said of the child/children that were offended/in fear of his hat.

Brainwashed.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 08:56 AM
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School is no place for political advertising. It's a learning place. The school has every right to set a dress code. I work in a building where political buttons, hats, etc. are expressly forbidden.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 09:39 AM
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originally posted by: damwel
School is no place for political advertising. It's a learning place. The school has every right to set a dress code. I work in a building where political buttons, hats, etc. are expressly forbidden.


And what better place to learn as a child the virtues of speech suppression. We wouldn't want uppity consumer trainees stepping out of line, would we?
Gotta nip that sh# in the bud as early as possible and continue such policies through their academic career so they can beat up and throw eggs at perceived adversity.

Way to think it through.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: reldra
a reply to: IAMTAT

He was able to wear the hat for several days. It eventually caused some type of disruption. The school told him he couldn't wear it at that point. That is fully within the right of the school to do. For any article of clothing.

Warning: PDF
School Handbook

The dress code is on page 40. It is mentioned at least twice, that even if something is not specifically mentioned as being prohibited, that if it causes a distraction or undue attention to the wearer, then it is not allowed. The student will be asked to change or remove it.

This policy is about the same across the board, at any school.




Unless that school is receiving Federal funds and then you got rights violations . I can't be sure, in your defense, whether minors have rights at all to begin with, but I'll look into it.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: reldra
a reply to: IAMTAT

He was able to wear the hat for several days. It eventually caused some type of disruption. The school told him he couldn't wear it at that point. That is fully within the right of the school to do. For any article of clothing.

Warning: PDF
School Handbook

The dress code is on page 40. It is mentioned at least twice, that even if something is not specifically mentioned as being prohibited, that if it causes a distraction or undue attention to the wearer, then it is not allowed. The student will be asked to change or remove it.

This policy is about the same across the board, at any school.




In the landmark decision Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the U.S. Supreme Court formally recognized that students do not "shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate".[1]

The core principles of Tinker remain unaltered, but are tempered by several important decisions, including Bethel School District v. Fraser, Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, and Morse v. Frederick.[2] Despite respect for the legitimate educational interests of school officials, the Supreme Court has not abandoned Tinker; it continues to recognize the basis precept of Tinker that viewpoint-specific speech restrictions are an egregious violation of the First Amendment.[2] In Rosenberger v. Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, the Supreme Court declared: "Discrimination against speech because of its message is presumed to be unconstitutional".

If it were my kid, I would sue them into the mantle.

edit on 6-6-2016 by EternalShadow because: add



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: EternalShadow

originally posted by: reldra
a reply to: IAMTAT

He was able to wear the hat for several days. It eventually caused some type of disruption. The school told him he couldn't wear it at that point. That is fully within the right of the school to do. For any article of clothing.

Warning: PDF
School Handbook

The dress code is on page 40. It is mentioned at least twice, that even if something is not specifically mentioned as being prohibited, that if it causes a distraction or undue attention to the wearer, then it is not allowed. The student will be asked to change or remove it.

This policy is about the same across the board, at any school.




In the landmark decision Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the U.S. Supreme Court formally recognized that students do not "shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate".[1]

The core principles of Tinker remain unaltered, but are tempered by several important decisions, including Bethel School District v. Fraser, Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, and Morse v. Frederick.[2] Despite respect for the legitimate educational interests of school officials, the Supreme Court has not abandoned Tinker; it continues to recognize the basis precept of Tinker that viewpoint-specific speech restrictions are an egregious violation of the First Amendment.[2] In Rosenberger v. Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, the Supreme Court declared: "Discrimination against speech because of its message is presumed to be unconstitutional".

If it were my kid, I would sue them into the mantle.
Last time I checked, the United States Constitution and Supreme Court decisions aren't trumped by student handbooks.



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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A nine-year-old boy has been banned from his California elementary school


Banned, huh? Not expelled, suspended, sent home, but "BANNED."

Nice choice of a trigger word there, daily caller. I'm sure people are foaming at the mouth, just like in this thread.

That said, right or wrong, there are some limitations on the First Amendment in public schools. Even though they are Public Schools, and even though students do retains a majority of first amendment rights on school property, students do not retain *complete* first amendments rights if the speech can be considered truly disruptive to the learning environment.

****

My god, the amount of ignorance in this thread is mind blowing.

edit on 6-6-2016 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: EternalShadow


"Discrimination against speech because of its message is presumed to be unconstitutional".


This is not restricting speech because of the message but that the speech is disruptive.


If it were my kid, I would sue them into the mantle.


Sue based upon what? The SCOTUS has already said a lot about free speech/expression (and restrictions thereof) in other cases.

While Tinker is still on the books, those other cases have clarified and more specifically defined free speech/expression in schools and the school's ability to regulate or restrict speech. As I believe Tinker said, while students retain their free speech in school, if that speech can be considered disruptive to the learning environment, the schools can restrict that speech.

A Trump hat (or any political hat) during an election could very well be considered disruptive. Plus, this is an elementary school.

It is reasonable that a political hat would be considered disruptive to the learning environment, which is why his speech (even though he's only 9) was restricted.

ETA:
See Burnside v. Byars, which was quoted in the Tinker decision.
edit on 6-6-2016 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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I still vividly remember when Nixon and McGovern ran for POTUS when I was in 3rd grade. Our elementary school held an election for the kids and held debates in class about the candidates positions. It was a big deal and it fascinated me. This was a great learning opportunity that was squandered, what a shame.



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