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What to study after finding the elusive Higgs boson?

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posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 05:38 AM
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What to study after finding the elusive Higgs boson? For one physicist, it's compassion

Reading this is uplifting to say the least. I've never thought of the Higgs boson search from this perspective, from a young scientist. Since they launched the LHC I've tried to stay in the loop of what they're doing, and it's been pretty quiet lately. Very interesting read... getting behind the scenes in a sense.




posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 06:36 AM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

Well, that scientist might feel compassion is worth a look, and I would agree.

But I believe there is much to be done with the Higgs yet. Learning to manipulate the Higgs field, to change the way the mass of a given object is recognised by that field... The rabbit hole is not yet fully explored!



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 06:56 AM
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Perhaps her time spent on de-focussing will actually connect her more to the true and ultimate reality. Hopefully, her de-focussing from mainstream science may inspire her in other out-of-the-Schrodinger's box theoretical thinking.



Her focus shifted to the fundamental questions. Why do we exist? What is the ultimate reality?

edit on 3-6-2016 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 07:08 AM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

What to study after the Higgs Boson?

I say, preons. The one thing mainstream physicists are afraid of exploring, because it could very well change our very understanding of the universe. But I've given proof that everything in the universe is composed of a single preon - one Master Particle which builds literally everything. Which brings us to one fundamental fact about us: we are all made of the same stuff. Whether it's a human, a ray of light, a neutron star, a dinosaur, even perhaps dark matter... Every single things in the universe share one profound connection: deep down, at the fundamental level, we are all of the same particle. The true "God" particle.

So, since we humans are all the children of the same primordial force, why not have some compassion indeed?


edit on 3-6-2016 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

What to study after finding the elusive Higgs boson?

Dark matter.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: Alien Abduct

In my opinion, dark matter is made of preons. Would explain alot, actually.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 07:33 AM
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Finding another particle does not explain mass in any way.
The mystery is still there to be solved.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 07:43 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: LaBaleine

Well, that scientist might feel compassion is worth a look, and I would agree.

But I believe there is much to be done with the Higgs yet. Learning to manipulate the Higgs field, to change the way the mass of a given object is recognised by that field... The rabbit hole is not yet fully explored!


I would suggest that the rabbit hole isn't fully explored because all we have achieved is learning that the habit hole is real.

For my entire teen years i wanted to become a particle physicist. For me, it was the most exciting brach of physics. Now, i was NO WHERE near smart enough to pursue it (i dropped out after 2.5 years of studying physics at uni, got way to hard), but i still maintain this is one of the most breathtaking branches of physics.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: swanne

It would.
They are actually working on creating a dark matter particle at the LHC. Maybe we will get oir answer.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

What to study after the Higgs Boson?

Maybe how to make more fuel (Element 115) for the TR-3B ?



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

Fermions, Leptons, W boson, Z boson, Gluon, Graviton, neutralino, chargino, photino, wino, zino, Higgsino, gluino, and so on. There is not shortage of sub particles we have not really figured out. Lots of universe to dissect left.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: Dr X
Finding another particle does not explain mass in any way.
The mystery is still there to be solved.
imo opinion dark matter is the one that gives mass to anything massy. take the dark matter out and the anything becomes massless while retaining its structure. lol wheres my np



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 04:10 PM
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I've been thinking about this and come to the conclusion... the more we learn the more we have to have to face the fact, we really don't know anything yet. Particle physics have proven there are certain particles that stay massless... that are not affected by the Higgs field... it leads to the question, how much is there that we don't perceive?



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 04:15 PM
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...and gravitation waves a reply to: Alien Abduct



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 04:16 PM
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...and gravitation waves a reply to: Alien Abduct



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 05:21 PM
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Preons are yet unproven, and mainstream particle physicists are not afraid to look into it, discovering compositeness in quarks would be ground breaking, and trust me, scientists love to break new ground. CMS released many TB of data to the public along with tools for analysis... so swanne, it is quite evident they are not scared or hiding anything, go take a look at the data and see if you can find evidence for compositeness. It is in all fairness not an experiment optimized to prove compositeness but still, data is available.

I already expressed my doubt to the composite solution to dark matter due to residual charge which would mean dark matter would interact more strongly than has thus far been evident. (ie... we have never directly detected it)

Lots of things to look for at the LHC, examples being - are there more than one higgs? there could be. A few different models beyond the standard model do make a case for more. Is a higher scale supersymmetry still possible? is there any evidence of particles beyond 3 generations.

Dark matter production at the LHC, quite possible in beam dump experiments, but that too assumes a standard model coupling strong enough for production at the energies accessible to the LHC, thus far, no one has been able to provide a good solid case that it is possible, BUT it doesn't stop people trying and several experiments are now looking for evidence for Dark Matter production in old data and new data too.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: LaBaleine

Yes, plenty of work to do



posted on Jun, 10 2016 @ 01:53 AM
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Yes understanding the Higgs mechanism will be a long road... And a century from now, that understanding might have shifted our way of life. It could lead to something completely novel.
It is bittersweet, since it is highly likely none of us will be there to see it.

a reply to: TrueBrit




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