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NEWS: Retiree Protests Spread Across Russia

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posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 05:47 PM
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A thousand retired Russians attempted to block the St Petersburg airport and as many as 10,000 took to the streets to protest the loss of key welfare benefits. The protesters accused Russian leader Vladimir Putin of genocide. A January first law takes away free benefits such as public transportation and medicine in lieu of a cash disbursement. The protesters claim the money does not replace the lost benefits.
 



story.news.yahoo.com
MOSCOW - A thousand retired people tried to block the road to a Moscow airport Saturday as 10,000 others jammed the avenues in President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg to voice their anger over a law that stripped them of some key welfare benefits. It was the largest show of discontent since the Kremlin leader took power nearly five years ago.

In the former Leningrad some in the huge crow called for Putin, the former KGB operative, to resign. The group in the Moscow gathered under red flags — the color of the Soviet Union — amid cries of "Down with Putin!"

"Putin's policy is that of a genocide," said Mikhail Kononov, an elderly St. Petersburg protester. "The government is waiting for all of us to die."


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Russia faces alot of turmoil from inside and out. Putin is worried about relentless NATO expansion and world criticism over his most recent consolidation of power. He is also fresh off the heels of the Ukraine debacle. Internally he has corruption, discontent, and a ongoing war in Chechnya. These protest are going to get worse once heating bills start coming in. Its going to be a long winter in Russia for both her people and Putin.




posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 08:54 PM
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My brother and I talked about this last night, over msn messanger, he explained that the so called ' riots ' are over, he described it as a somewhat peaceful demonstration, without any pressure of the FSB or other internal security forces. As for Putin resigning I seriously doubt that the larger majority really want this, my family for one, he has brought un-heard of economic growth for Russia in the past 5 years, also lowered the cost of medicine provided the public with more option for public transportation. The elderly are surely upset, but I really think it is uncalled for-- for such a demonstration when 5 years ago it wouldn't even be possible. As for them using the red flag as there protest banner, how dare they should be grateful that such things are viable, it would never have been aloud in the Soviet Union, I think they are becoming slightly greedy.



posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 09:05 PM
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The pensioners Russia have been amongst the hardest hit by the harsh realities of freedom. It's no surprise that the elderly residents of Leningrad are nostalgic for the old days.

What is more frightening are the marches and protests invoking the image of Stalin. When Uncle Joe's Russia seems like the good old days, you are seriously disaffected.



posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 10:19 PM
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I will not be surprised if our own retirees will start protesting in masses after Mr. Bush reform here in the US.


You know what, a picture from one of South Park episode mocking the AARP comes to mind, they were all dress and armed like militia type.



posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by deevee
The pensioners Russia have been amongst the hardest hit by the harsh realities of freedom. It's no surprise that the elderly residents of Leningrad are nostalgic for the old days.

What is more frightening are the marches and protests invoking the image of Stalin. When Uncle Joe's Russia seems like the good old days, you are seriously disaffected.


When you see ' you are seriously disaffected ' I severly hope you are in no way implying that to me. If so, on what grounds ?



posted on Jan, 15 2005 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
I will not be surprised if our own retirees will start protesting in masses after Mr. Bush reform here in the US.


You know what, a picture from one of South Park episode mocking the AARP comes to mind, they were all dress and armed like militia type.

That was one hilarious episode, if it's the one you're referring to. They took over one of the buildings downtown.

Cartman: "How come they were able to take over that building?"
Dad: "Because they get up earlier than everyone else."



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 10:33 AM
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Originally posted by Kenshin

Originally posted by deevee
The pensioners Russia have been amongst the hardest hit by the harsh realities of freedom. It's no surprise that the elderly residents of Leningrad are nostalgic for the old days.

What is more frightening are the marches and protests invoking the image of Stalin. When Uncle Joe's Russia seems like the good old days, you are seriously disaffected.


When you see ' you are seriously disaffected ' I severly hope you are in no way implying that to me. If so, on what grounds ?


No, I meant what I said simply and literally. When Russian citizens who lived through Stalin's regime wistfully remember them as "the good old days" it speaks volumes about their current situation. Thats all.



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 10:41 AM
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Your words reveal a great deal of Ignorance Deevee.

You know very little of Russia.

In Russia , Stalin is regarded as the man who defeated Hitler.

The less pleasant aspects, there are those of course, but you obviously cannot comprehend the sacrifices the Russian people made, again and again, since Alexander Nevsky, to defend the Motherland.

That and General Winter.

So, of course old people remember Stalin, he was their leader, he won the war.

Russia History is not fairy tale, it is a History of hardship. I advise you to learn more, before you issue such pamphletary statements.



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 11:45 AM
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Actually I have a university degree in Russian history. You are misunderstanding my point.

edit: AND my grandparents and aunt and uncle are from the Ukraine

[edit on 16-1-2005 by deevee]



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 02:38 PM
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No matter who Stalin defeated he was an evil man, a murderer.... I see at least one person defending what Putin is doing, which is 100 times worse than what is happening in the US, and this person obviously claims he is a proud communist....

The only reason i can think that anyone can defend Stalin, or the reorganization of a communist state under Putin, is if his/her family was one of the few priviledged families that worked for the dictator. Stalin conducted widescale mass executions, arrests and deportations of the Kulak class.... The kulak class was anyone who opposed the "collectivation"......

Stalin appeared to have been at first just like any other liberal of these days....He was always having problems with the local authorities and had pretty much the same liberal ideas that are now being embraced by many of the youth in the west......yet he became one of the worse men in the history of the world.

Hitler also did some good things for some of his people....but he did the worse imaginable things to millions....

The few good things stalin might have done does not outweight the mass genocide and other horrors he inflicted, including to his own people....


Here is a link to the early history and the genocide that Stalin committed....
www.fatherryan.org...

[edit on 16-1-2005 by Muaddib]



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by jsobecky

Cartman: "How come they were able to take over that building?"
Dad: "Because they get up earlier than everyone else."


I love South Park I think their dark humor is just to much to let go.

I think our elderly are the stronger people around they have been "there and done that" before we all has even tried.



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