It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

US company made guns out of 4.6 billion year old meteorite going for 4.5 million $US

page: 2
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 08:16 AM
link   
a reply to: kita0dtita

Lost technology is fascinating, there a hectares of terra preta in the amazon that no one knows how to replicate, or the Stradivarius. Some people says we will face mass loss of technology soon when most of the data of the 70s and 80s will be in digital devices that we will lose the ability to access.




posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 08:31 AM
link   
Damn! Right now I'm sitting about three miles from Cabot Guns and never knew that they existed. I'm going to see if I can take a look at that gun.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:41 AM
link   
a reply to: Sublimecraft

That is a sexy pair of pistols!



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:50 AM
link   
As old as the solar system the wise OP says.

I would ruin the crap out of these. Just jam the magazine all over the the place trying to break them down for cleaning.

Guns should be functional, not gold plated or meteorite tempered. Art guns are gay, like that BMW art car. Freaking drive it or shoot it.
edit on 0220160620161 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:01 AM
link   
My brother is instrument maker and no one is able to make clear lack paint with acoustical properties like Stradivarius or Guarnerius, we all forget or deliberately don't tell if we have no one to be worthy of info. Romans were making concrete that dries underwater, info lost until early 20 centurie. Early humans were not stupid, they had exactly the same brains as we do, and probably knowed more info than today middle schoolers, especially from US of A. Sorry that is europian bigotry earned from few poor users of yours goverment schools.
a reply to: Indigent



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: IShotMyLastMuse
of course americans had to make guns out of it!


Well King Tut made a knife out of his!

King Tut's knife

I'm not even American but that is a pretty low blow. Humans...we make weapons out of anything. No wonder the Ayylmaos are keeping their distance!


edit on 2-6-2016 by Jonjonj because: rules



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: swanne

All metal is as old as the earth isn't it? Silly point to make I think.


Ya beat me to it.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 02:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: swanne
What a waste of precious meteorites. Typical of mankind's warmongering mentality: "Hey, look, we've got rare rocks as old as the Solar System which falls from the sky only once in a blue moon... What should we do with them? Ooh, I know, let's turn them into guns. "



Oh, stop the hyperbole.

First, not all guns are weapons of war, or even ever used against another human being to take a life. In fact, I would say that most are not...especially 1911s, and especially 1911s made from meteorites.

Also, meteorites are not THAT precious--I'd rather people snatch up meteorites and use their metals than to dig into the earth and use up all of the fossil fuels and electricity and materials (steel, rubber, etc.) needed for large-scale mining operations that supply the world with steel. Just because the meteorite comes from space doesn't mean that it can't be used for practical (or even impractical) purposes.

Just because you appear to vehemently dislike guns doesn't meant that using a single meteorite to create a gun equates to a waste of meteorites.

And just for perspective:

A study done in 1996 (looking at the number of meteorites found in deserts over time) calculated that for objects in the 10 gram to 1 kilogram size range, 2900-7300 kilograms per year hit Earth. However, unlike the number above this does not include the small dust particles. They also estimate between 36 and 166 meteorites larger than 10 grams fall to Earth per million square kilometers per year. Over the whole surface area of Earth, that translates to 18,000 to 84,000 meteorites bigger than 10 grams per year. But most meteorites are too small to actually fall all the way to the surface.


(emphasis mine) So, let's just assume that 0.05% of meteorites that fall to earth each year are large enough from which to manufacture a 1911 pistol. That still gives us between 9-42 each year that reaches the surface of the earth. Considering that approximately 70% of the earth's surface is covered by water, that still gives us on average 2(ish)-10(ish) meteorites hitting land every year that are large enough to create a 1911 pistol. Just for the sake of erring on the side of caution, let's just say that the meteorites of that size that have hit land and are not lying underground (say, the last 2,000 years) are the only ones available for harvest by humans--that leaves literally between 1,643,625 and 7,487,625 meteorites of this size within surface access by humans. Remember, that's only the ones that have fallen within the last 2,000 years. I'm guessing that there are still many more than that within reach of humankind without much effort.

So, shall we reconsider the claim of "precious" or "once in a blue moon" claims?

Just saying.
edit on 2-6-2016 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: Indigent
a reply to: kita0dtita

Lost technology is fascinating, there a hectares of terra preta in the amazon that no one knows how to replicate, or the Stradivarius. Some people says we will face mass loss of technology soon when most of the data of the 70s and 80s will be in digital devices that we will lose the ability to access.




Thank heavens for books!!!



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:23 PM
link   
Cool...semi-related recent article:


King Tut’s dagger made of iron from a meteorite

www.usatoday.com...



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 04:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Sublimecraft

Thanks bro I did not have time to do at that moment.



posted on Jun, 13 2016 @ 08:08 PM
link   
I don't know. The grain looks way too rough to be able to pull that slide back reliably. Is the metal strong enough to handle a round being fired? Absolutely, but that's not the only necessary component that make it a functional firearm.

I'd like to see it in action.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1   >>

log in

join