It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

So there is water on the moon?

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:43 AM
link   
What a casual Freudian slip.
Btw.. there are ET based there too...??




Not so dry after all: Moon's water came mostly from asteroids, not comets, study says

When did we establish that the moon was covered in water? I mised that..




The moon had long been thought to be exceedingly dry, based on rocks brought back by NASA’s Apollo lunar missions starting in the late 1960s. But more advanced techniques in recent years have actually picked out significant signs of water in those samples, said study coauthor David Kring, a planetary scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. In fact, he added, though the surface is parched, the lunar interior might actually have about 10,000 to 10 million times more water than the surface seems to hold.



source

The entire article seems off...




“Basically, whatever was happening on the moon was happening on the Earth,” Kring said.

The findings could also help scientists adjust their understanding of the forces at play in the larger solar system, Kring added. After all, if the majority of the moon’s water during this time period came from asteroids, it meant that the comets were not getting dragged out of their distant, elliptical orbits and yanked into the inner solar system.

The theory that comets predominantly brought water to Earth (and other bodies) requires some pretty notable movements or accretion rates on the part of gas giants like Jupiter, which are the only planetary bodies massive enough to exert the necessary gravitational pull. If most of the water instead came from asteroids, it might offer scientists new clues into the behavior of Jupiter and its cohorts during this time period, the scientist said

edit on 1-6-2016 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:48 AM
link   
The moon is not covered in water.. He is speculating the moon may contain water in its interior..



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: Misterlondon
The moon is not covered in water.. He is speculating the moon may contain water in its interior..


Theres no speculations there.

These are findings not theories

Actually, the wording is interesting in this article
edit on 1-6-2016 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:55 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz




In fact, he added, though the surface is parched, the lunar interior might actually have about 10,000 to 10 million times more water than the surface seems to hold


Yes, the clue is in the wording.. He says might not does..



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:56 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz

Water was found on the Moon in very recent years.

We're not talking about standing ground water though; it's more like wringing out a dry sponge and feeling a slight amount of moisture in there. Irrc, we could scoop out a 1 metre cubed block of crater regolith and, under heat, it would evaporate a small amount of water hence the dry sponge analogy.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:03 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz


But more advanced techniques in recent years have actually picked out significant signs of water in those samples, said study coauthor David Kring, a planetary scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.

What? How they were stored and for how long down here would change their water content to some degree, exposing them to ambient air with a little humidity in it would lend to absorption on some level. Am I just pissing in the wind about that? What 'advanced, recent techniques' are they referring to?

Or is this a further ploy to get some wealthy people more interested in investing in going back there?



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:04 AM
link   
a reply to: Kandinsky

Thank you, thats more like it. They would have to mine water and refine it from moon soil, like any other mineral.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:08 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: odzeandennz

Water was found on the Moon in very recent years.

We're not talking about standing ground water though; it's more like wringing out a dry sponge and feeling a slight amount of moisture in there.



I get that

But its the significance and how a lot of those water molecules can exist on the moon. And the article also points that the moon once had as much water as earth.
Im also skeptical, as are scientists on the model that all of earth water came from asteroids...
In 2016... these shouldn't be answers to questions, they should be trivia on board games.

Im baffled that it seems more and more often we are coming with theories on the illusion of perception. And what we think is happening isnt what's actually happening, or things manifest a certain way because we are observing them.

Will there be a study which one day refute everything I learned in science class; as our perceptions change and thus observations? I say yes.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:11 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz

Wait, are you ready for this one?!?

There is water on Mercury.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:13 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz

Water molecules are not found on the Moon. There may be some subsurface frost, but anything on the surface would sublimate. Most of the water believed to be on the Moon would be found as hydroxyls bound up in silicates: rocks and dust. The exciting thing is that these hydroxyls can be extracted and turned into water, oxygen, and hydrogen (which can be used as a fuel).



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: DJW001
a reply to: odzeandennz

Water molecules are not found on the Moon. There may be some subsurface frost, but anything on the surface would sublimate. Most of the water believed to be on the Moon would be found as hydroxyls bound up in silicates: rocks and dust. The exciting thing is that these hydroxyls can be extracted and turned into water, oxygen, and hydrogen (which can be used as a fuel).

It's actually likely that some water-ice does exist in permanently shadowed craters.
link



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: odzeandennz

Water was found on the Moon in very recent years.

We're not talking about standing ground water though; it's more like wringing out a dry sponge and feeling a slight amount of moisture in there. Irrc, we could scoop out a 1 metre cubed block of crater regolith and, under heat, it would evaporate a small amount of water hence the dry sponge analogy.





More or less what i'd read too.

The water is locked up in the rocks and dust as ice mostly...there are no known standing water deposits, no pools or streams, no rivers or lakes. The interior, while thought to be hollow (cavernous, swiss cheese-like) at least in some areas, is an unknown quantity too...it may have residual heat deep inside the interior, creating pockets of liquid water, or water with a dirty snowball slush like quality, but that's speculation.

Last i read, it was estimated that the known water deposits (Ice) if liberated entirely from it's host rocks and dust, would equal around 100 Olympic sized swimming pools total volume of liquid water...not a massive amount, a single medium sized lake or so really...but would be a very handy resource for future manned moon bases, and as a staging area for MArs missions, given that Rocket fuel can be made from the water on the moon.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:22 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz

You've just made me read TFA.

Lots of ideas and lots of supporters for each one of those ideas. Not as many accepted answers.

In life, it's often a combination of answers that eventually become a working, accepted hypothesis - holistic.

Perhaps the origin of the Moon is the one that says a collision between two bodies formed Earth and Moon? If our world was already carrying H20, the hypothetical impact would have left both bodies with water and, possibly, one with much less. The hostile lunar conditions could have 'wicked' off the rest until we're left with those traces deep below the surface where sunlight never twitches the temperature?

Toss in wandering 'clay' asteroids and icy comets to top up the water content of either world and maybe we're close to a 'unifying theory?'

Finding a couple of water worlds around an exoplanetary system could teach us a lot about ourselves.

It's fun to speculate and sort of penalty-free when the experts aren't unanimous yet either



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:34 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz




Moon's water came mostly from asteroids, not comets, study says



While Science says:


While asteroids consist of metals and rocky material, comets are made up of ice, dust, rocky materials and organic compounds.


I love it...



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:39 AM
link   
First was Mars, now the Moon.. What's next? Water on Earth?



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 09:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
First was Mars, now the Moon.. What's next? Water on Earth?


Look, this is a conspiracy site, but let's not go all "crazy" here. Keep it within the realm of possibilities.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 09:33 AM
link   

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
First was Mars, now the Moon.. What's next? Water on Earth?


Look, this is a conspiracy site, but let's not go all "crazy" here. Keep it within the realm of possibilities.


An even crazier idea are lifeforms that wander around a planet, seemingly intelligent, but are mostly made up of fleshy bags of water...nuts, i know.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 09:57 AM
link   
a reply to: MysterX

Blasphemy!



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 11:13 AM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz

I found some FACTS on YouTube that PROVE the Moon has standing water in the form of LAKES, RIVERS, OCEANS and there are even HYDRO-ELECTRIC DAMS that generate power for the CIVILIZATION that builds their CASINOS in craters!

All kidding aside, the video that is presented, if legitimate, is intriguing (at least to my blurred vision).

The up-loader claims the footage has been created using a high-powered telescope (privately owned) and depicts what appears to be structures, arches, lakes and other anomalies. The narrator believes that some of the shadows look "suspicious", but the only part of the video that was even partially convincing to me were the (apparent) structures inside of a crater.

Here is the link to the person who supposedly acquired the footage: JohnLenardWalson




edit on 612016 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)

edit on 612016 by seattlerat because: my spilling sugs



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 11:35 AM
link   
Basically, whatever was happening on the moon was happening on the Earth,” Kring said.

There's my theory still standing ,
The moon was created by volcanos from Earth .




top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join