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Does the Sun leave the sky?

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posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:25 AM
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originally posted by: stargatetravels

originally posted by: TerryDon79
I still don't understand the point of this thread.

Your question has been answered by myself and a few others.

What is it that you're looking for?



It's just nonsense mental masturbation - nothing more.

In another thread I saw this phrase... 'The meteor traversed the sky'.
My point is that the sky is the area above the Earth that is seen by an observer on or near the surface of the Earth.
The point of reference for most humans is the Earth.
Most humans refer to the Sun being high in the sky, as in 'High Noon'.
The Sun does traverse the sky.

•The Sun, Moon and planets traverse the same strip of sky from east to west.
Source: teachastronomy.com
Since the Sun does traverse the sky, isn't it possible to admit that it leaves that visible strip at night???




posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:31 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: stargatetravels

originally posted by: TerryDon79
I still don't understand the point of this thread.

Your question has been answered by myself and a few others.

What is it that you're looking for?



It's just nonsense mental masturbation - nothing more.

In another thread I saw this phrase... 'The meteor traversed the sky'.
Which it doesn't, but seems like it does.



My point is that the sky is the area above the Earth that is seen by an observer on or near the surface of the Earth.
In unscientific terms, you're correct.



The point of reference for most humans is the Earth.
Obviously.



Most humans refer to the Sun being high in the sky, as in 'High Noon'.
Really? Most people I know just call it noon.



The Sun does traverse the sky.

•The Sun, Moon and planets traverse the same strip of sky from east to west.
Source: teachastronomy.com
But it doesn't. It's an illusion that it does.



Since the Sun does traverse the sky, isn't it possible to admit that it leaves that visible strip at night???
The sun doesn't traverse the sky though. And how would something that is not in contact with the other leave a strip?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79



The sun doesn't traverse the sky though.

Stupid astronomers... right?

•The Sun, Moon and planets traverse the same strip of sky from east to west.
again with the source


The period within a few weeks of the winter solstice in late December is the darkest time of the year for northern latitudes. Not only does the Sun traverse its lowest arc across the sky at this time, but in many places the Sun sets before the end of a normal workday and rises after many people have already started their daily routines.

Stupid US Naval Observatory... right?
See that red part, they got it all wrong... you better call them up and give them hell too.




And how would something that is not in contact with the other leave a strip?

The same way that an actor or actress leaves a scene shown on a movie screen.... when they actually never had contact with the screen itself. It is visual.
Better yet, when a ship leaves the field of view of the periscope of a submarine.






edit on b000000302016-06-02T09:55:15-05:0009America/ChicagoThu, 02 Jun 2016 09:55:15 -0500900000016 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: TerryDon79



The sun doesn't traverse the sky though.

Stupid astronomers... right?

•The Sun, Moon and planets traverse the same strip of sky from east to west.
again with the source


The period within a few weeks of the winter solstice in late December is the darkest time of the year for northern latitudes. Not only does the Sun traverse its lowest arc across the sky at this time, but in many places the Sun sets before the end of a normal workday and rises after many people have already started their daily routines.

Stupid US Naval Observatory... right?
See that red part, they got it all wrong... you better call them up and give them hell too.




And how would something that is not in contact with the other leave a strip?

The same way that an actor or actress leaves a scene shown on a movie screen.... when they actually never had contact with the screen itself. It is visual.
Better yet, when a ship leaves the field of view of the periscope of a submarine.


The sun appears to traverse. Saying it does makes it easier for the laymans to understand.

It's like saying right peddle in a car makes it go faster. While technically true to the layman, it would be false to the mechanic.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79
The Moon orbits the Earth.
Does it traverse our sky?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: TerryDon79
The Moon orbits the Earth.
Does it traverse our sky?


No, it does no traverse the sky. It does not move across or through the sky. It gives the illusion that it is traversing the sky.

The moon actually traverses our field of view when we look up at night (if the moon is visible).



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79



The moon actually traverses our field of view when we look up at night (if the moon is visible).

That part in red is the definition of sky.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: TerryDon79



The moon actually traverses our field of view when we look up at night (if the moon is visible).

That part in red is the definition of sky.



From Earth, yes. From anywhere else, no.

So the moon and sun "traverse the sky" as viewed from Earth (again, laymans term), but not from space.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:28 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Ok, I'll play your game. The sun and moon travel through the sky.

4 pages in and all you're doing is arguing semantics. Please hurry up and get to whatever point it is you're trying to make.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: TerryDon79



The moon actually traverses our field of view when we look up at night (if the moon is visible).

That part in red is the definition of sky.



From Earth, yes. From anywhere else, no.

So the moon and sun "traverse the sky" as viewed from Earth (again, laymans term), but not from space.

Show me the accepted definition of sky that isn't what I have shown so far. I have posted definitions. You are referring to the 'sky' as viewed from space. Show me a definition that refers to the sky in that fashion.

Not a layman's term, as I have shown it used by the US Naval Observatory.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:35 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: TerryDon79

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: TerryDon79



The moon actually traverses our field of view when we look up at night (if the moon is visible).

That part in red is the definition of sky.



From Earth, yes. From anywhere else, no.

So the moon and sun "traverse the sky" as viewed from Earth (again, laymans term), but not from space.

Show me the accepted definition of sky that isn't what I have shown so far. I have posted definitions. You are referring to the 'sky' as viewed from space. Show me a definition that refers to the sky in that fashion.


From a simple google search "sky definition".

sky
skʌɪ/
noun
1.
the region of the atmosphere and outer space seen from the earth.
"hundreds of stars were shining in the sky"
synonyms: the atmosphere, the stratosphere, the skies





Not a layman's term, as I have shown it used by the US Naval Observatory.
They use laymans terms so everyone can understand it.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: TerryDon79
a reply to: butcherguy

Ok, I'll play your game. The sun and moon travel through the sky.

4 pages in and all you're doing is arguing semantics. Please hurry up and get to whatever point it is you're trying to make.

I already have, and it isn't a game.

The word 'sky' has a definition and you are using one that I am not familiar with. I have posted definitions of the word.
If you want to find one that fits your definition and post a link, that would be great.

But here is the deal.
Go outside at your home during a clear day around noon.
Look UP (for most of us you will be looking at the sky).
You should see the Sun.
Then go outdoors at your home at midnight.
Look up at the sky.
Do you see the Sun in the sky?
Is it visible to you at midnight?

If it isn't there, then it must have left the sky.... because it isn't there.

Notice that I am not saying that it left the solar system or that it has ceased to exist. It is no longer in the portion of space that is visible to the observer from the Earth (also known as the sky).

Yes, if you can't use the proper definition of a word, it would seem to be nothing more than semantics.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: TerryDon79
Yes, you have posted a definition of just what the sky is....
visible portion of above an observer.
An observer can't be in two places at one time.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Well I'll leave you to it.

I'll let you in on a new thread you might want to make. It's similar to this one. It should be called "water is wet".

Enjoy your....whatever this is.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 11:22 AM
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It could be a figure of speech to say the sun leaves the sky, but we all know that according to science the sun isn't doing the leaving - the earth is, by turning (leaving the current sky), causing us to look at a different "sky". It's like facing a building, then turning your back to the building. The building didn't leave your field of vision - you were the one who moved away from it. "Leaving" implies movement, and we know the building didn't move/leave. You could say that you can't see the building anymore, or you could say the building is no longer in your landscape view, but you can't accurately say that the building left your landscape view.


So, I'll go along with you as long as you admit it's a figure of speech and not science to say that the sun leaves the sky. A figure of speech doesn't have to be accurate, i.e., time flies when your having fun doesn't literally mean that time is moving faster when you're having a good time.



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: EmmanuelGoldstein
a reply to: butcherguy
What is this?
An IQ test?


Whaaat, lol



posted on Jun, 5 2016 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Your so funny take it out of context but hey if that cheat works for you. I at least know what kind I'm dealing with.



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