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Is willfull ignorance actually a disease?

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posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:51 PM
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Recently, I have been observing an ever increasing trend of people refusing to accept probable explanations and evidence (actual scientific evidence and published studies) for odd happenings. Even when presented in an intelligent and honest fashion, it is received only with vitriol and personal attacks. And, this attitude seems (to me) to be spreading. It seems to be acting in a viral manner in it's spread across the globe. It makes me wonder if there is an underlying medical cause at work. Could this behavior actually be caused by some infectious agent affecting the brains of these individuals? Recently, there have been studies where some known diseases have been found to be caused by (or related to) viral or bacterial infections. For example:

Alzheimer’s could be caused by past infections, researchers say

More than five million Americans live with the degenerative brain disease that robs people of their memory. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. a study led by Harvard University researchers and published this week in the journal “Science Translational Medicine” suggests that Alzheimer’s could stem from the brain’s past attempts to fight off infections.


Type 1 diabetes may be triggered by bacteria

Study co-author Dr. David Cole, of the School of Medicine at Cardiff, and colleagues reveal how bacteria activate "killer T cells" - white blood cells that attack healthy cells instead of protecting them - to destroy insulin-producing cells, causing type 1 diabetes.


So, as medical technology continues to link previously known ailments with infections, I now wonder if this recent phenomena is also caused by some viral/bacterial infection? And, if so, there are questions to be answered:

  • Is it a natural infectious agent?
  • Is it a man-made agent?
  • Is it intentional?
  • Is it a side-effect of some other environmental change?
  • Could there be a cure?


If it is man-made and intentional, who and why is it being done? Talk about conspiracy, here is one that has potential to be investigated and documented if it does not spread out of control and stop it's own investigation.




posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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I blame house cats. Even dog lovers have been infected.

Natural immunity is hard to get, I'm afraid. You pretty much have to love reading (books) more than you love hearing yourself talk. The cat-virus kills that first, apparently.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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So because people do not believe in certain subjects.. They have a brain disease.
Firstly do you have any examples of what subjects you are referring too?
Secondly, what about cultural differences, personal beliefs, religious beliefs, learned beliefs (from parents) past experience..

Just because people do not conform or believe in the things you do, does not mean they are ill it just means they are different..



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

I blame the parents.

Seriously though, when people have faith and belief, you can't argue against them, that's why it's probably best to leave the likes of the religion forum well alone.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:20 PM
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It could be that throughout history science has been used for gain and evidence has been structured to show things that are not real. Interpretation of scientific evidence and choosing the parameters of the research can cause the evidence to be used inappropriately.

So I will have to say it was a failure of the people overseeing the use of scientific evidence that caused people not to trust the interpretations of it. Fad science application is just as bad as pseudoscience.

Some things to investigate would be who is gaining from the use of scientific evidence and who funded it or set up the parameters of research.

I would say that those who do not research what science is stating are the ones we should be investigating for signs of delusion. Science can be used to steer us in the wrong direction or to steer us in the right direction. A true researcher would just state what they found and show the parameters they used to come to their conclusions. I have read a real lot of research paying attention to this and have looked at the conclusions by the ones utilizing the evidence and have found that nearly half the times the conclusions are misinformation.

You have to go look at the evidence to see if it is saying what the person is implying it does. To believe something without actually looking at both sides of the issue is not scientific. I do not believe everyone who has a certificate hanging on their wall without actually looking at evidence myself.

So am I nuts, I sure hope so, what would be the use of being a member of ATS if all you did was parrot what the government and special interest groups told you.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:27 PM
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Considering that science stated before that diabetes was in no way related to any sort of infection and could not be spread from person to person, I think that should just about answer your question as to why people are ignorant to science.

Actually, this evidence about an infection of a similar antigen type microbe close to the composition of the islets in the liver is probably right. But how do you expect people to believe it when they did a huge reversal. I bet many doctors will not believe this even though this is real evidence where consensus of the time as related to the subject had no evidence to back it.

I am not down on science, I am down on misinterpretation of the evidence for personal gain or because their beliefs do not match what is being said. I see so much of it all over, twisting things to fit your beliefs and knowledge you hold.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:28 PM
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dumb virus

..or the answer to your question yes,
Come on down to Florida, we dumb you long time



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7
Interesting. I have been reading the studies on this finding (I was previously unaware of it until you posted it).

Algae in Your Throat? Scientists Discover Algae Virus in Humans

To further elucidate the effects of the virus, the investigators infected a group of mice and analyzed their performance on a set of tests designed to measure the rodent equivalent of human cognitive function. Animals infected with the virus exhibited deficits similar to those observed in humans. Infected animals had worse recognition memory and spatial orientation than uninfected mice. For example, they had a harder time finding their way around a maze, failing to recognize a new entry that was previously inaccessible. In addition, infected animals were less likely to pay attention to a new object, spending nearly 30 percent less time exploring it than uninfected mice, a finding that suggest shorter attention span and greater distractibility. The researchers caution that drawing direct links between mice and humans can be reductive but, they say, the parallels observed in the study were rather striking.

(emphasis mine)

So, I wonder if this could be causing confabulation in the memory, as well as the outright refusal to accept anything that changes their minds or disagrees with their internal narrative and feeling of "being correct". I have seen first-hand similar types of behavior in a very close family member that suffered from Alzheimer's Disease. The failing memory and vehement denial and often violent reactions to anyone trying to correct their incorrect perceptions. Makes me wonder if any of these folks would submit to t throat culture to identify if they do have this algae in their system? If (this is a BIG IF) they are suffering from this infection, then the question would be will they be willing to try a cure to kill off this algae?

Yes, interesting indeed.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: Krakatoa
Recently, I have been observing an ever increasing trend of people refusing to accept probable explanations and evidence (actual scientific evidence and published studies) for odd happenings. Even when presented in an intelligent and honest fashion, it is received only with vitriol and personal attacks. And, this attitude seems (to me) to be spreading. It seems to be acting in a viral manner in it's spread across the globe.


I have a theory that this is related to social media in general. Many seem to listen only to enough information to respond to, and not necessarily enough to get their brain gears churning. Even here, many will respond with a witty comment for stars in what should be a serious discussion. How we communicate online, transfers to how we communicate offline. I also believe, that due to many people "waking up" for lack of a better term, some are developing this phenomena as a coping mechanism. It's just easier to act like something isn't going on (will full ignorance) than to have the little bubble they work so hard to keep up burst. Face it, the REALITY of this world as seen through the eyes of a conspiracy theorist can be a hard thing to swallow at times, even among ourselves.
edit on 30-5-2016 by AccessDenied because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Not at all. I am trying to understand this phenomena using understood and studied possibilities. The probability it is an unknown infection causing this is much much higher than the probability that some totally unproven and untestable belief is causing it. I am not saying that the explanations being tossed about now are not possible, only that the probability of such is very very low.....much lower than a potential infections disease.


edit on 5/30/2016 by Krakatoa because: spellcheck



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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I dunno. I think "hard heads" are just determined they're gonna dig their heels in like it proves their character or something.

Even when they know they're proven wrong they refuse to budge.

They may say, somewhere down the line - - I did my own research and this is what I have decided.

But, it has nothing to do with anything I was told.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

If ignorance is a disease, then expect millions of stupid people to get on disability.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon
So because people do not believe in certain subjects.. They have a brain disease.
Firstly do you have any examples of what subjects you are referring too?
Secondly, what about cultural differences, personal beliefs, religious beliefs, learned beliefs (from parents) past experience..

Just because people do not conform or believe in the things you do, does not mean they are ill it just means they are different..


I don't think that's what the OP meant. I've witnessed what he's talking about many times. It'd be like if a person was convinced that strawberries were green, so you show them one, but instead of realizing strawberries are red, they completely disregard what they've just seen and continue claiming that strawberries are green.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: Krakatoa
a reply to: Misterlondon

Not at all. I am trying to understand this phenomena using understood and studied possibilities. The probability it is an unknown infection causing this is much much higher than the probability that some totally unproven and untestable belief is causing it. I am not saying that the explanations being tossed about now are not possible, only that the probability of such is very very low.....much lower than a potential infections disease.



I've actually discussed this exact thing with a friend. I was imagining a possible link between this phenomena and the idea that our reality is a simulation. Due to certain things I've witnessed, it isn't too far out of the realm of possibility in my own mind to believe that perhaps some people aren't actually real conscious beings, but rather "filler programs" designed merely to take up space, so to say. Some people just seem to me to be more like... poorly designed programs rather than conscious things.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 03:42 PM
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I think there's shades of truth in this. In general having cognitive deficits will lead to what you would expect, but we also have so called "cognitive reserves". So depending on the damage, global or localized, effecting tissues as a whole, or specific neurotransmitters, or axons, or dendrites... hell you could have so many different ways in which symptoms manifest to go about with the labeling of a "disease".

The brain will also reorganize in attempts to compensate, but maybe the issue is regular wear and tear with an incapacity to regenerate the same as most. How the many vectors of infection or degradation may come to be depends on so many factors, I personally would rather we do away with most labels and start focusing in on what has actually changed within the individual on an objective, measurable level.

So would a general lack of cognition lead to serious errors in judgment? Yea, it probably would. There's all sorts of wacky labels out there for people with specific, serious goof ups in the noggin. I think one of those could involve all the features needed to manifest a severe lack of insight into things that would otherwise be common sense.

All of this is not taking into consideration stress levels within the individual, society, or cultural shifts that might blind individuals from the obvious.

My paps has a lot of problems, and now that I'm not in my invincible first quarter century of life, I can see how this could have come to be. Too stressed, too long, adapting to a level of burnout best can be had. Things dislocate, connections slide out of accord, and you end up jumbling up your words, taking on tasks in inefficient ways, and keeping to a drive to keep on regardless of the energetic costs and long-term consequences. It's pretty well similar.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 04:26 PM
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I disagree on this one. For an example, look at me. I pride myself on being a "jack of many trades". My goal is to learn a little bit about nearly everything. And that's helped me stay prepared in many random situations.

But there are still many subjects I just don't give a crap about. If someone tries to explain them to me, I zone them out and the words just go in one ear and out the other. I simply don't want to hear about those topics, don't care for those people's "advice", etc. So how would this theory work w/me?

If anything, I think everyone is like me in that regard. There are some topics they can pick up easily and there are other topics that will never stick w/them. Some people will never want to understand complex algorithms, interpretive dance, computer programming, the appeal of certain things in pop culture, certain religious interpretations, hanzi and kanji, etc. That doesn't mean these people have a mental illness. Otherwise, it would mean that all people have this "illness" because everyone's willfully ignorant of something.

And for the record, what's "correct" in science changes often. You can't blame some people for doubting different "scientifically proven" ideas since so many of these same ideas can be countered by other scientific "studies". Take tobacco and asbestos for instance. For decades, they were argued "scientifically" to be safe. Then there are the scientific studies right now that contradict each other over the benefits of various drugs and compounds, like glycosophate. So which ones should people believe?

Not to mention that anyone can call himself/herself a scientist, which also allows con artists to sell "scientifically proven" supplements and herbal remedies that don't do crap. And then there are scientific labs that take money from related industries in order to create favorable test results for those industries' products and services. How can those scientists be trusted when they're literally selling their services like that?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

I believe you are misunderstanding my point. In your example, having no interest in a topic, is not part of the issue. The issue is when someone is adamant about a topic, bordering upon obsessive, yet still refuses to consider or even accept as possible another explanation that is both more probable and has peer reviewed and scientific evidence in its favor. Am I saying blindly accept as fact all studies, hell no. But, to not even consider the findings from people that are experts in a field (and are experts for a reason), and blindly go on simply anecdotal and unsubstantiated explanations that are so improbable to be nearly impossible is the topic of my question.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 04:44 PM
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Is willfull ignorance actually a disease?


Yes but only in the sense that compulsive shopping and co dependency are diseases. The technical term for it is "denial".



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 04:58 PM
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"Get your facts away from my truth"

Truth is subjective.

The real problem is that people believe their personal truth to be fact. Emotion overrides their logic when confronted by anything that threatens that "truth".



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa


There is no such thing as "willful ignorance." No one chooses to be ignorant. They just are. It is a lack of education that produces ignorance. If someone is in denial about a certain fact, that just proves they do not have enough information on the subject. Being closed minded is not a disease but it is an infliction.




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