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"My God! It's Full of Galaxies!

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posted on May, 30 2016 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Are you trolling? Or do you genuinely want an answer?




posted on May, 30 2016 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Because people lie, like... a lot. Odd that people that frequent a conspiracy theory website would take anything at all at face value. But to each their own...



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 06:37 AM
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Maybe if you can really fathom the size of the universe it would be more like torture, and you would die from the feeling of insignificance.

In the Douglas Adams Hitchhikers series, there is a form of torture that is to hook you up to a machine to fathom the size of the universe, compared to yourself. It was called the Total Perspective Vortex -



..is allegedly the most horrible torture device to which a sentient being can be subjected.



When you are put into the Vortex you are given just one momentary glimpse of the entire unimaginable infinity of creation, and somewhere in it there's a tiny little speck, a microscopic dot on a microscopic dot, which says, "You are here."



Located on Frogstar World B, the machine was originally invented by one Trin Tragula in order to annoy his wife. Because she was forever nagging him for having no sense of proportion, he decided to invent something that would show her what having a sense of proportion really meant. Unfortunately the shock of being placed in the Vortex destroyed her brain




The machine produces a virtual reality model of the entire universe by means of the axiom that any piece of matter is affected by all other matter. The Vortex reconstructs the universe through computer processing of a high-resolution scan ("extrapolated matter analysis") of a piece of fairy cake. In the words of the Hitchhiker's Guide, '...since every piece of matter in the Universe is in someway affected by every other piece of matter in the Universe, it is in theory possible to extrapolate the whole of creation - every Galaxy, every sun, every planet, their orbits, their composition, and their economic and social history from, say, one small piece of fairy cake.'



Only Zaphod Beeblebrox is reported to have survived the Vortex unscathed (and then to have eaten the small piece of fairy cake). When it showed him the "You Are Here" marker, Zaphod correctly interpreted the Vortex as simply telling him that he was the most important being in the universe. This is due to the fact that he entered the Vortex in an artificial universe, which had been specially created for his benefit (thus making him the most important being in it). .. After emerging from the artificial universe's Total Perspective Vortex, Zaphod ate the piece of fairy cake, saying "If I told you how much I needed this, I wouldn't have time to eat it."


Total_Perspective_Vortex
e dit on 30-5-2016 by nOraKat because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

You just reminded me of a quote from The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft.

"The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age."

www.hplovecraft.com...



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: rival

No, they do not.

You have been hoodwinked by synopsis. Read, or listen to Max Tegmark; --nothing actually "banged." Our universe formed through rapid inflation, growing space exponentially in far less than a single second. In fact, the total elapsed "time" of the event is likely something on the order of 10^-33 and 10^-32 seconds, which is just -- nothing really.

Nevertheless, our universe moved from a relatively hot, dense state, to a relatively cool, dispersed state in a fraction of a blink of an eye, and there was no center, as even the "space" around initial quantum perturbations grew exponentially, creating a framework, by which gravity worked on very subtle differences in the uniformity of that very early dispersed gas cloud, giving rise to larger structures like stars, planets and galaxies.

We are still inflating, albeit not locally. Our Hubble volume is doubling in size every 8 billion years or so. Even the "space" between distant galaxies not gravitationally bound to one another is doubling in size at the same rate. There is no center. Rather, we perceive our universe to be 13.7-13.9 billion "years old" in all directions, with Earth at it's center, because we are the observer, inside the scenario. Another observer, on a distant planet orbiting one of the stars in one of the galaxies in that Hubble image might look at us, through it's own version of a Hubble telescope and wonder at the primitive initial structure of our proto-galaxy as well.

Perspective is a stone bitch in space.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 08:12 AM
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I just had an idea. All the tiny faint galaxies in that image can be made out clearer with some levels adjustment:



I wonder if anyone is ever going to catalogue all these galaxies.




posted on May, 30 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Locally? I'm sure they already do.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 09:07 AM
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Humans are never going to travel far into space with the material body. You can only do that with your astral* body. (*terminology maybe be incorrect). Of course the universe is full of multiple realms/galaxies. Your soul is just bound within your material container / vehicle / body. Otherwise you can travel through objects and are not limited by 3d space (in non physical realms).



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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Probably a stupid question...but are there any lone stars floating im the vast distances between those galaxies?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: rival
a reply to: intrptr

Interesting thought, but our brightest minds theorize that the
universe DID explode from one central point.

Of course, they could be wrong...AND, you could be right.

But if that's the case, we've already had this conversation
and, frankly, it's getting monotonous...

Thats because your mind is fixed on beginnings and endings, here and there, the past and future.

Linear thinking.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Its not like a usual explosion, there is no centre

In an infinite Universe, everywhere is the center of it all.

Is, was and always shall be.


Even in a homogeneous expansion, there has to be a perimeter that the universe is expanding into. What that may look like is mind boggling… no time or space exists at the boundary until it is suddenly occupied….

The boundary you place there is in your mind.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Waxing philosophically that's like saying "in an infinite universe everywhere is no-where and no-where is the centre"

No, just that there is no boundary out there, and if there is, whats out side that?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
Probably a stupid question...but are there any lone stars floating im the vast distances between those galaxies?

Yes, but they have formed in some galaxy and then got flung out. en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Another Hubble volume that is precisely as large from the point of view of an observer within it, as there are "years" since it's inflation created it?

The real mind-blower is when you realize that any other observer in our own Hubble volume would view its boundary as exactly as large -- in all directions -- from their own Hubble telescope as we do, but that theirs might see further than ours because they are near what we perceive to be the limit of their own however-man-billions-of-years expansion bubble.
edit on 30-5-2016 by 0zzymand0s because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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I am convinced that we will travel to the planets of our Solar System but that's it. As soon we reach the outer rims of our Solar System we will have surpassed the climax of Humanity long time already - barely alive.

That would be the only reason / motivation to even get to the outer rim and that's the problem with most space faring civilizations. They will be long destroyed before they can reach a maturity level of intergalactic travel.

Now don't get me wrong - you don't have travel as a "human" through the galaxy - a coded sequence of a human - the basic make up of a human stored in organic or digital form would be enough.

I believe that is were we drifting to.. Modern development in AI and Machine Learning will be the key components to build sentient ships that are able to traverse the vast amount of space to reach distant planets. Even robotic ships are not as romantic as traveling with "Warp speed" around the Galaxy - they are the only viable solution short and long term.

Just for the heck we will go to Mars - but only for the reason to learn how to build ships in orbit and get viable technology to move a lot of raw materials into orbit.

There will be small outposts on other Planets within our Solar System - maybe some crazy nut Billionaire will build a Resort on Ceres.

Probably there will be some experiments in using Ion drives to accelerate to 10% of the Speed of light and reach in a very small amount of time the nearby star system - but we will never hear back from these folks again - they might not like what they discover.

Everything we do in terms of inter galactic travel won't scale - one off's maybe but not something like a Trade Network with other civilizations.

The only way we survive as a species would be to seed ourselves around the Galaxy - which I firmly believe has and will happen.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Excellent post. When one considers that there could be up to a trillion stars in the milkyway alone, not to mention hundreds of billions of other galaxies. If not more. It makes one realize how insignificant we are as a species. It's statistically impossible that we are the only intelligent life in the universe. It makes war and class struggle seem so pointless. This may sound like a sort of communist utopia idea; but imagine if it was humanity's goal to end poverty and hunger, oligarchy and inequality with the goal of understanding our universe more completely and getting off this rock.

Hopefully someday, long after we're all dead, we will have advanced as a species and found a way to preserve ourselves before a mass extinction event or the sun dying.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: intrptr

Another Hubble volume that is precisely as large from the point of view of an observer within it, as there are "years" since it's inflation created it?

The real mind-blower is when you realize that any other observer in our own Hubble volume would view its boundary as exactly as large -- in all directions -- from there own Hubble telescope as we do, but that theirs might see further than ours because they are near what we perceive to be the limit of their own however-man-billions-of-years expansion bubble.

In other words, its infinite. i.e., goes on forever. And if so, then its had pretty much forever to fill with life, too.

Hubble has expanded our minds, not space. Space has always been there, will always be there. I'll change that back to a bounded Universe when the next telescope looks even further and sees a sign that reads the end or no trespassing.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: wildespace


I wonder if anyone is ever going to catalogue all these galaxies.


That would take forever.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: nOraKat


When it showed him the "You Are Here" marker, Zaphod correctly interpreted the Vortex as simply telling him that he was the most important being in the universe.

Tilt. No more important than any other person in the Universe, all of which are one of a kind, totally unique, and as important or not as anyone else.

How does it feel to be that precious?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 12:57 PM
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originally posted by: MarsIsRed
I don't think we are alone either.... but the possibility is defiantly real. Like I said, it's a scary thought.

defiantly real

Don't you just love auto correct!


Actually, your auto correct seems to have been accidentally, poetically profound.

If you take all the debate about life extraterrestrially and lump in that we've only managed, with our best efforts, to find hints of even microbial life (past or present), the phrase generated has a concise beauty that, imo, would be worthy of quoting.

edit on 5 30 2016 by CornShucker because: spelling



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