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"My God! It's Full of Galaxies!

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posted on May, 29 2016 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Its not like a usual explosion, there is no centre

In an infinite Universe, everywhere is the center of it all.

Is, was and always shall be.


Even in a homogeneous expansion, there has to be a perimeter that the universe is expanding into. What that may look like is mind boggling... no time or space exists at the boundary until it is suddenly occupied....




posted on May, 29 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MarsIsRed

Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space.
en.wikiquote.org...


so far, space is infinite. the figure of our universe being 13 or so billions of years old is simply a lie. it just means that they haven't been able to detect more beyond that, using our present day technology. they never seem to include that part when talking about the age of the universe
edit on 29-5-2016 by jimmyx because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 08:03 PM
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I think without life forms, the Universe, though huge, is probably boring. After all, every celestial body we've studied is either molten, or gaseous, or rocky, or icy, or liquid, or a combo of those.

It would be a huge variety of life-forms that would make the universe exciting to explore, don't you think?



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 08:13 PM
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a reply to: wildespace
Why is everything so far away woildnt there be closer worlds. Also y are planets, moon, sun cgi if we can see other galaxies



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 09:57 PM
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And the super rich thought they ruled the universe. Lol



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 10:46 PM
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So huge, I hope an alien race doesn't decide to build an overpass through us. That would suck.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 11:07 PM
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Those kinds of numbers are just difficult to even try to comprehend. My guess is there is life everywhere. If it can reach us we are nothing but ants to them. For all we know we could be an experiment like bacteria in a petri dish. Colonized by higher lifeforms that seek their own answers about life. Or maybe just a experiment to see if we'll destroy ourselves over which god has the bigger wang.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 11:15 PM
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A Tiny Glimpse

It would take the USS Enterprise over 10 million years at maximum warp to reach the nearest galaxy in the photo. Insane.

edit on 29-5-2016 by Konduit because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 11:20 PM
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for some reason these 2 ideas popped into my head after seeing that image

Larry: [to Jennings, while high] Okay. That means that our whole solar system could be, like one tiny atom in the fingernail of some other giant being. [Jennings nods] This is too much! That means one tiny atom in my fingernail could be--
Jennings: Could be one little tiny universe.
Larry: Could I buy some pot from you?




posted on May, 29 2016 @ 11:53 PM
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originally posted by: Konduit
A Tiny Glimpse

It would take the USS Enterprise over 10 million years at maximum warp to reach the nearest galaxy in the photo. Insane.


Makes my head hurt just thinking about it. Maybe we have one of the shortest life-spans in the cosmos. Ten Million years might just be 2 or 3 generations to another species.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 11:56 PM
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originally posted by: chrismir
What puzzles me is that no matter how deep we look into space, or rather how far in the past we look, everything is as organised as 'normal'. These deep field images supposed to show us stuff from relativily close to the big bang, so I would expect a bit more chaos then the images closer in time.

Actually, if you look more carefully, lots of galaxies in those deep-field images are not "normal". They have weird shapes and colours, and many of them are twisted from close encounters with each other. They also seem to be a lot more crowded in those images, although I'm not sure if it's just the effect of perspective or they were really that close together.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 12:18 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
no matter how hard i try, i don't buy that they looked at a galaxy that was only 500mil after the big bang.

Beyond that, interesting image.

Are you doubting that galaxies could have formed so soon after the BB? The universe probably started out quite "clumpy" to begin with (due to the "foam" of quantum fluctuations translating into the macro scale), and gravity made those clumps clump even more and race towards each other, ending up in those gigantic swirls of matter we call galaxies.

Incidentally, today's APOD is all about that: apod.nasa.gov...




How did the universe evolve from such a smooth beginning? To help understand, computational cosmologists and NASA produced the featured time-lapse animated video depicting a computer simulation of part of the universe. The 100-million light-year simulation starts about 20 million years after the Big Bang and runs until the present. After a smooth beginning, gravity causes clumps of matter to form into galaxies which immediately begin falling toward each other. Soon, many of them condense into long filaments while others violently merge into a huge and hot cluster of galaxies.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:23 AM
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originally posted by: Chronogoblin
So... How do you know that it's real? Take their word for it?



Why wouldn't I?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:24 AM
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originally posted by: OrionHunterX
Check this out! And most of us think we are the only living beings in the universe!!




I'm fairly certain most people believe the exact opposite



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: Discotech

www.youtube.com...

Then I encourage you to watch the above video by a pastor friend of mine. His dad drew the Chik Fil A Logo. He loves this stuff....he talked about this back around 2008. It is truly indescribable...and we are small and insignificant.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 01:55 AM
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originally posted by: MarsIsRed

originally posted by: Discotech
a reply to: wildespace

It actually hurts my mind trying to comprehend just how vast the space we are a part of really is.

It's illogical to think we're alone when you think how many galaxies there are that we can "see"

It's a very humbling thing to realise just how small and insignificant we really are in the vastness of space but it's also reassuring that there's probably others far far away thinking the same thing and looking back in the opposite direction


Yet the Fermi paradox is a real thing. It's terrifying whether it's right or wrong!


The Fermi Paradox claims a contradiction between high estimates of communicative civilizations and the fact that we haven't heard from them, failing to note that:

1) Radio signals from Earth attenuate to nothingness by the time they've traveled 200 light years
2) Even the most liberal application of the variables in the Drake Equation do not predict a number of advanced civilizations high enough to create a paradox.

In short, the Fermi Paradox isn't a paradox. Even if the galaxy is teaming with advanced civilizations, the statistical likelihood that we would have heard from them is remote.
edit on 30-5-2016 by Greggers because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 02:08 AM
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I think we can forget about intergalactic travel.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 05:16 AM
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a reply to: intrptr



In an infinite Universe, everywhere is the center of it all. Is, was and always shall be


Waxing philosophically that's like saying "in an infinite universe everywhere is no-where and no-where is the centre"

or "Is was and always will be" is counter punched by "there is no tomorrow or yesterday only the Now"

I don't claim to fully understand the physics this but for what its worth...
maybe this will help you

math.ucr.edu...
or
www.spaceanswers.com...

as to time... which time are you talking about, relativistic or non relativistic?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 05:31 AM
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a reply to: Konduit




It would take the USS Enterprise over 10 million years at maximum warp to reach the nearest galaxy in the photo. Insane.


I think your calculator is lying; what assumptions are you making to get to the >10 mill years?


en.wikipedia.org...
Warp drive is a faster-than-light (FTL) spacecraft propulsion system in many science fiction works, most notably Star Trek. A spacecraft equipped with a warp drive may travel at fantasy speeds greater than that of light by many orders of magnitude. In contrast to other FTL technologies such as a jump drive or hyper drive, the warp drive does not permit instantaneous (or near instantaneous) travel between two points but involves a measurable passage of time which is problematic to the concept. Spacecraft at warp velocity theoretically continue to interact with objects in "normal space"



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: charlyv




perimeter that the universe is expanding into. What that may look like is mind boggling... no time or space exists at the boundary until it is suddenly occupied....


are "perimeter" and "boundary" the correct phraseology to use? If no time or space exists at the boundary prior to occupation how long for or how far away has expansion occurred?

why call it a perimeter if there is nothing or nothing created outside of such perimeter. What is it a boundary of?

My head hurts!



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