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"My God! It's Full of Galaxies!

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posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: nOraKat
Does anyone know if there are videos of galactic events online?

In our galaxy, it takes about 225-250 million years to complete one journey around the galaxy’s center, so I don't think we would be able to see it spin if we watched it on a video, but I was wondering if maybe we can observe movement in some other galaxies on a video.

For example are there any movies/video of 2 galaxies colliding? Or one simply moving? Anybody know?

No, those kinds of events are too slow for us to notice, even if we filmed them over the course of a century. What we did manage to "film" was supernovae flashing up and dimming in other galaxies:

www.youtube.com...




The only noticeable movement in deep space was only filmed in our own galaxy, such as expanding supernova remnants or jets from planet formation:

www.youtube.com...
In the middle of the Cassiopeia Super nova you can see the single white dot, orb. I have seen this same dot in other nova's. Nucleus, point of singularity? Point of creation??




posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

That is an excellent observation and theory, nOrKat! I think you're on to something.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:49 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
Personally, I think Einsteins real genius was in his Quotes, not his math.


I'm gonna take a guess here and assume you are unwilling or unable (most likely ) to show us all exactly how Einsteins maths are wrong?

And please don't say you didn't say that. It's very clear to all what you are implying.

Meanwhile..Einsteins equations will continue to be used day in day out for applications used by everyone; yes including you!
I stand by what I said.

Einstein, was a brilliant man, but just the same, a man who made mistakes. But his quotes, divine....

5 things Albert Einstein got totally wrong

Experiment Proves Einstein Wrong

E=mc2 is Wrong - Einstein's Special Relativity Fundamentally Flawed



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 02:28 AM
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originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
In the middle of the Cassiopeia Super nova you can see the single white dot, orb. I have seen this same dot in other nova's. Nucleus, point of singularity? Point of creation??

That could be a neutron star or a black hole. arxiv.org...
That's what gets left over from the collapsing star that produces a supernova.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 04:33 AM
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Can i ask a question, which is probably stupid, and i think i asked already but can't find any trace of it.

Are there any lone stars floating in the vast distances between these galaxies. I assume there are. They must be few and far between.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Yes , a recent study by NASA suggests that nearly Half the stars out there are orphaned from their Galaxies.

Instead, this finding of bright, blue light unexpectedly reveals these fluctuations may come from something called "intrahalo light," which is created by stars flung into intergalactic space during titanic collisions and mergers of galaxies. The researchers found that there was as much light from these intergalactic stars as there was from stars located in galaxies. "This light is equal to all the light from stars in galaxies," Bock told Space.com. "This is telling us that stars are torn from their galaxies more often than previously thought." -
www.space.com...

That's a lot of rogue stars.




edit on 2-6-2016 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Yes , a recent study by NASA suggests that nearly Half the stars out there are orphaned from their Galaxies.

Instead, this finding of bright, blue light unexpectedly reveals these fluctuations may come from something called "intrahalo light," which is created by stars flung into intergalactic space during titanic collisions and mergers of galaxies. The researchers found that there was as much light from these intergalactic stars as there was from stars located in galaxies. "This light is equal to all the light from stars in galaxies," Bock told Space.com. "This is telling us that stars are torn from their galaxies more often than previously thought." -
www.space.com...

That's a lot of rogue stars.







Incredible. I never thought the number would be that high.
edit on 2-6-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2016 @ 08:54 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: charlyv




perimeter that the universe is expanding into. What that may look like is mind boggling... no time or space exists at the boundary until it is suddenly occupied....


are "perimeter" and "boundary" the correct phraseology to use? If no time or space exists at the boundary prior to occupation how long for or how far away has expansion occurred?

why call it a perimeter if there is nothing or nothing created outside of such perimeter. What is it a boundary of?

My head hurts!





Well, ok, just like in the "boundary" of a black hole, they call it a horizon. Difference being , on the other size of the universe... if you can even say that, there is a "Horizon" in which it expands into. It is a head hurter.
edit on 3-6-2016 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 12:56 AM
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Knowing the vast distances between us and those galaxies, and seeing so many of them that already appear 'red and dead', or close to it, I wonder if the vast civilizations that may have inhabited them even exist anymore.



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

Well, there's the Hubble boundary, which is the absolute limit of what we will ever be able to see due to the expansion of the universe vs. the speed of light. And that is a reasonable horizon.



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 01:04 AM
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a reply to: gortex


Maybe the "rogue" stars are still in the process of migrating to the Galaxy that will have the strongest pull? Perhaps after the big bang, or creation, our Universe was ALL stars and NO galaxies, but over time "clumps" of stars started forming and galaxies were born. As time passes, these gravity wells (galaxies) will ultimately claim the last of the stars. The process of galaxy formation is still ongoing, but so slow that its imperceptible to our brief existence.



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

We can see stars forming.
They form in existing galaxies, where there are clouds of gas and dust.



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 01:48 AM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: All Seeing Eye
Personally, I think Einsteins real genius was in his Quotes, not his math.


I'm gonna take a guess here and assume you are unwilling or unable (most likely ) to show us all exactly how Einsteins maths are wrong?

And please don't say you didn't say that. It's very clear to all what you are implying.

Meanwhile..Einsteins equations will continue to be used day in day out for applications used by everyone; yes including you!


www.techinsider.io/physics-einstein-got-wrong-2015-11

www.techinsider.io...
edit on 4-6-2016 by TheRedBaron because: freedom



posted on Jun, 4 2016 @ 01:51 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: charlyv




perimeter that the universe is expanding into. What that may look like is mind boggling... no time or space exists at the boundary until it is suddenly occupied....


are "perimeter" and "boundary" the correct phraseology to use? If no time or space exists at the boundary prior to occupation how long for or how far away has expansion occurred?

why call it a perimeter if there is nothing or nothing created outside of such perimeter. What is it a boundary of?



A void.



posted on Jun, 19 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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i think the appeal for me, at least with space, is the vision of idealized versions of ourselves. We hope that its not just dead gases burning away as nuclear fire in the cold stillness of space. We hope for civilizations like our own, better in some ways. We hope even to find intelligent life superior to us, like Gods or Angels by whatever name. We hope to find solutions to our problems, ideas unmanifest, and wish fulfillment.

I think we are all startled by size, scale, brightness, and other facts and figures, but those aspects grow dull and boring without that spark of hope and intelligence.



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