It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Hidden Consumerism of Camping and Outdoor Activities

page: 1
11
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:26 AM
link   
With the summer season approaching I thought this was a fabulous article to share. I love the outdoors, and camping especially, and myself I can get very caught up in this very phenomena .
It's been stated that camping is an activity where you spend tons of money to live like you are homeless. True enough.
Personally I have scoffed at some of the products in the stores directed at what I call " WEEKEND WARRIORS".... Those who go buy a lot of gear they don't need but think they do. For example, I saw a small bag with 5 twigs in it labelled " campfire kindling" and it was priced at $4.99.
My gosh if you buy a product like that...you have no business being alone in the woods.


The slow-creep of consumerism into the world of camping is similar to that of sports. There’s gear that you really need for camping. And then there are some things that you want for camping that make the experience better. And then the consumer addiction to camping gear starts! You only need to visit an outdoor sports store once to see how quickly the escalation happens.


Much like any other area where consumerism begins to creep in and take over, one of the only ways for companies to make money is to convince you that “real campers” have more gear. Before long you’re adding more lanterns, more stoves, more sleeping comforts, more tools … the list goes on and on. How do you counteract this? The answer is to always use the twenty-four hour rule. Wait twenty-four hours before you purchase anything and use that time to think about whether you really want or need it for camping enjoyment or practical reasons or whether you’re just in the gear spiral.

The Upgrade Game : You have a tent, but do you have this upgraded tent with all of these extra features? You have a perfectly functional backpack, but wouldn’t this upgraded backpack with more pockets be better? How do you avoid upgrade marketing? Always stay grounded in whether the upgrade truly offers you a feature or features that you honestly need or that would honestly improve your experience or if you’re just falling prey to the enthusiasm of upgrade marketing tactics and coveting “more, more, more.” Sometimes you need an upgrade. Most of the time you do not!
LINK TO FULL ARTICLE
What are your essentials and what are products you avoid ?




posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:32 AM
link   
Ive been on both sides, and I can tell you its more trouble to drag most of that crap out for a weekend than its worth. I stay simple. Its sooooooo much easier.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:33 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

They have to buy twigs in a bag because they don't know that there is wood in the woods.






posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:43 AM
link   
LOL!! Indeed - if you buy those twigs, you don't have any business being out there....

I think experienced backwoods campers/hikers know that the less you carry, the easier the going. A bedroll, food, utensils, flashlight, Zippo, extra socks, fresh water - a map, a compass. Good to go.
I got a nifty hammock made out of superlight parachute cloth that weighs about 2 ounces - that's a good thing. The equipment is really cool, though - they come up with neato stuff; compact little cooking kits that fit together like nesting dolls -- MREs (meal, ready to eat), etc.

Most importantly - if you pack it in, pack it out or consume it. Leave the area as pristine as you found it.

Rule number one ^^. And if you MUST carry lots of stuff, bring a mule!

edit on 5/28/2016 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:49 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

Agree with all of the above!
Sharp knife, first aid supplies, hatchet (used to take a machete but we don't get along. Long story!)
Something to start a fire. Fishing tools if you plan to catch dinner, bed roll, map, compass. Clothing for different weather conditions. Good hiking shoes. Dry tent or good tarp and a book, in case of rain!




posted on May, 28 2016 @ 07:58 AM
link   
a reply to: TNMockingbird

Excellent, I forgot to mention those. First aid, a knife, and a poncho that can double as a pup tent! (Do they make those?)



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:00 AM
link   
a reply to: BuzzyWigs
I think the biggest thing people forget, is that they have to carry it all.
" Hey look, it all fits in the trunk of the car! " Does not equate to the load on your back..lol
I have to admit...I have been tempted to buy the propane coffee maker...but only tempted.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:05 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

Lol, funny thread lead.

I saw some people heading out this memorial weekend. They had a pick up bed filled with dirt bikes and towed a trailer filled with ATVs.

I just know some nice quiet wild area is going to be beset with wing ding ding ding motocrossing fools, tearing up the landscape and upsetting the local wildlife.

What fun.

I used to camp in the boy scouts and later in my 'Outdoor' phase. In the city even, BBQ pits and benches at parks during the day, underpasses overnight.

Travel light. Make 'nests', don't keep anything valuable with you that you can't carry. It boils down to rugged, wear dry clothing, a few implements to make fire, shine light, something to eat for a day or two, and a bit of faith… goes a long way.

As far as 'camping' like city folk understand it, the camp "Grounds" these days are a joke, pay to get in, pay nightly, limits on cooking fires, noisy place, bathrooms are unique, etc. Its like living back home only theres no walls separating you from the neighbors.

Buying sticks for fire at the store… priceless.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:07 AM
link   

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: TNMockingbird

Excellent, I forgot to mention those. First aid, a knife, and a poncho that can double as a pup tent! (Do they make those?)


Not sure!

Patent it!

Immediately!

LOL



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:21 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

Very true! My idea of camping is what is called "dispersed" camping, which basically means on your own in the middle of nowhere, no other campers. I follow a website called Bushcraftusa, and Bushcraftuk which deals mostly on the bare minimalist camping. Basically a tarp, sleeping bag and not much else. Everything you need should fit in a pack. That I think is true camping, plus you are learning invaluable survival skills while you are at it.


iTruthSeeker



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:23 AM
link   
What I've never understood.. how come you buy a tent and it's packed in this nice little bag..
You take it out set it up, no problem but then you go to pack it all away and it never fits in the bag again.
So you just shove it in the car, then In the garage and end up buying a new one next year..

It's a scam I tell ya...



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:29 AM
link   

originally posted by: AccessDenied
With the summer season approaching I thought this was a fabulous article to share. I love the outdoors, and camping especially, and myself I can get very caught up in this very phenomena .
It's been stated that camping is an activity where you spend tons of money to live like you are homeless. True enough.
Personally I have scoffed at some of the products in the stores directed at what I call " WEEKEND WARRIORS".... Those who go buy a lot of gear they don't need but think they do. For example, I saw a small bag with 5 twigs in it labelled " campfire kindling" and it was priced at $4.99.
My gosh if you buy a product like that...you have no business being alone in the woods.


The slow-creep of consumerism into the world of camping is similar to that of sports. There’s gear that you really need for camping. And then there are some things that you want for camping that make the experience better. And then the consumer addiction to camping gear starts! You only need to visit an outdoor sports store once to see how quickly the escalation happens.


Much like any other area where consumerism begins to creep in and take over, one of the only ways for companies to make money is to convince you that “real campers” have more gear. Before long you’re adding more lanterns, more stoves, more sleeping comforts, more tools … the list goes on and on. How do you counteract this? The answer is to always use the twenty-four hour rule. Wait twenty-four hours before you purchase anything and use that time to think about whether you really want or need it for camping enjoyment or practical reasons or whether you’re just in the gear spiral.

The Upgrade Game : You have a tent, but do you have this upgraded tent with all of these extra features? You have a perfectly functional backpack, but wouldn’t this upgraded backpack with more pockets be better? How do you avoid upgrade marketing? Always stay grounded in whether the upgrade truly offers you a feature or features that you honestly need or that would honestly improve your experience or if you’re just falling prey to the enthusiasm of upgrade marketing tactics and coveting “more, more, more.” Sometimes you need an upgrade. Most of the time you do not!
LINK TO FULL ARTICLE
What are your essentials and what are products you avoid ?


I know a lot of outdoorsy types. They love to brag about their expensive gear and all their cool camping toys. When I go camping with them they always laugh at my fairly basic and inexpensive gear.
My favourites are the engineered 'walking poles', those ones that look like ski poles. Any time I see someone under 60 using them I can't help but laugh. I don't know, for me, one of the great things about hiking is finding that perfect branch to carve into your own walking stick.

Personally I like just simple gear. A decent sleeping bag is always a nice luxury though.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:41 AM
link   
a reply to: TNMockingbird

Out here in the desert we have a differet inventory. You really are taking your life in your own hands if you sleep directly on the ground. I mean, i've done it a lot of times...but i never sleep very well because everything wakes me up thinking a rattler decided to bunk with me. Or a scorpion, which may not kill me. But itll make me wish for death.

The rattlers is why i like to take the Judge camping. I load it with 410 shells for the snakes, and keep some 45 rounds handy for the 2 legged snakes that may creep up to rob us.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 09:15 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

Personally speaking, I tend to fall into the bracket of people who get gear, and make it last as long as possible. I had the same 2 man dome tent from the age of 12, right up until the age of about twenty four years of age. The only reason I changed to a rapid pitching, pop up variant, was when one of the segmented poles in my old tent, decided to snap, and shred the loop it slotted through, as well as the outer skin of the tent. Rather than try to rely on a patch, and having had my monies worth out of my old tent, I replaced it. If the old one had never broken, I never would have replaced it.

Similarly, I only got hold of a proper backpack, when my crappy old one started coming apart in such a fashion as to be unrecoverable. I do not pack fancy doodads. I pack food, sunscreen, clothing, toiletries, camera, (although I have been largely using my phone for that), my phone and a battery pack to charge my phone with, a bedroll and sleeping bag, and not a great deal else...aside from beer...many, many beers. If I am out in the wild, I can get wood anywhere I want, know how to dry twigs for kindling, and so on.

An over abundance of gear would be an encumberance beyond justification!



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 09:38 AM
link   
Think everyone falls prey to the over-packing till they get into a routine and things shake out.
I'm kind of middle of the road, been backpacking an it was challenging in a good way, but it's not my thing.
My must haves are simple. Couple of good chairs, small cooler ( slightly bigger than a lunchbox) the foam 4-piece bed from our old camper, small sledge and large spikes & tent. I have a screen tent, but don't put it up unless it actually is going to rain. Roll of toilet paper and roll of paper towels.

The bed is the luxury part because if you play hard a comfortable place to sleep is invaluable. Little bulky, but that sucker is in 4 parts and 8 inches thick. I've woken up too many times on the ground because another air mattress
lied to me. It's a double sized deal and a fitted sheet keeps it together, some of you guys know what I'm talking about? I can't recommend it enough!!! It fits in the backseat of the car, or stacks in the back of my truck. Truck for back-country trips car for just fast destination trips.

All food packaging is ditched and re-packaged into minimal packaging cause less is more.

Tiny container of kerosine for emergency fire starting (little jelly jar) and little bit of dry kindling from home stored in a small sealed plastic container. One big jar candle with a lid for light. Lanterns annoy me, a couple of the tea lights for at night in the tent if I wanna read, collapsible 2 gallon water container.

Thats pretty much it.

Oh...the first aide kit. Also tiny but has everything.
Anything else can be picked up during my travels.

The one thing I did buy long ago and it seemed insane was a battery operated tent ceiling fan. I know right?
That summer was ridiculously hot, but that little fan worked and moved the air around enough fairly quietly.
My kids use it now, but it was a vacation saver!!

If I'm going I wanna enjoy myself not make more work. Don't want to spend much time packing or unpacking at the end of a trip. Fast and light works.


Forgot to say, everything is pre-packed in a small tote but the chairs an bed so just toss it into vehicle. Easy-peasy.
edit on 28-5-2016 by Caver78 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 09:48 AM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I've been contemplating getting one of those wind up/crank radios.

Maybe one with a flashlight and siren.

We don't really camp THAT far out anymore but I could see it being a useful tool if for nothing else than to keep abreast of weather.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 10:11 AM
link   

originally posted by: Misterlondon
What I've never understood.. how come you buy a tent and it's packed in this nice little bag..
You take it out set it up, no problem but then you go to pack it all away and it never fits in the bag again.
So you just shove it in the car, then In the garage and end up buying a new one next year..

It's a scam I tell ya...

HOW ABOUT THIS??? THIS is the tent I want...

CINCH
I'd LOVE one of these too...

LayBag



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 10:13 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

"Laybag"?

Wow. Not a very suggestive name or anything....nahhh.....
LOL!!



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 10:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: AccessDenied

"Laybag"?

Wow. Not a very suggestive name or anything....nahhh.....
LOL!!

I know right?



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 10:19 AM
link   
a reply to: AccessDenied

It's SWEET!!!
but WAY too many guidelines.

Dunno how many older campers are here but the running joke with gear is "you look like a gift wrapped bear snack"
This makes you a fancy lighted Bear-Snack!!



Oh..the Lay-Bag....that puppy is an accident waiting to happen! (wink-wink grins!)
edit on 28-5-2016 by Caver78 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
11
<<   2 >>

log in

join