It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.

page: 1
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:25 PM
link   
This could truly be a nightmare. I just got a tooth pulled and got antibiotics to stop any infection. The damage something like this can do could be on apocalyptic scales. A world without antibiotics is a nightmare scenario you might expect to find in a Sci-Fi movie. Here's more:


For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could signal "the end of the road" for antibiotics.

The antibiotic-resistant strain was found last month in the urine of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman. Defense Department researchers determined that she carried a strain of E. coli resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The authors wrote that the discovery "heralds the emergence of a truly pan-drug resistant bacteria."


www.washingtonpost.com...

I hope they can do something to stop this. I'm not well versed in this area but I've watched the movie Outbreak
If anyone knows more about these things, I would like to hear any commentary.




posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:31 PM
link   
super bug and trump....we are doomed.
Cheers



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:34 PM
link   

originally posted by: neoholographic
A world without antibiotics is a nightmare scenario you might expect to find in a Sci-Fi movie.
Or basically the entire existence of humankind up until the discovery of antibiotics.

This is terrible news, but I have to wonder. Perhaps this will usher in the age of nano machines and medicine that can seek out ad destroy threats within the body, and then hopefully self deconstruct.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:52 PM
link   
a reply to: AmericanRealist

But before antibiotics we weren't causing the same bugs to evolve into bigger and badder versions. And I think before nano bots we are going to see bacteria being used to fight off bugs.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:04 PM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic

The article was updated today. I think i remember reading this in the last week. Regardless, this is a problem.

Overuse of antibiotics has been said for years to be a problem.

I would imagine, like many bacterial infections, it will be spread in hospitals. Hopefully, it can be contained while a treatment is found.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: AmericanRealist

But before antibiotics we weren't causing the same bugs to evolve into bigger and badder versions. And I think before nano bots we are going to see bacteria being used to fight off bugs.


Bugs as in viruses or bugs that crawl around? Or using one bacteria to fight another?
edit on 26-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:07 PM
link   
Already posted HERE



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: AmericanRealist

originally posted by: neoholographic
A world without antibiotics is a nightmare scenario you might expect to find in a Sci-Fi movie.
Or basically the entire existence of humankind up until the discovery of antibiotics.

This is terrible news, but I have to wonder. Perhaps this will usher in the age of nano machines and medicine that can seek out ad destroy threats within the body, and then hopefully self deconstruct.


I saw a video on nano medecines/machines just this week. I think they are deep into research on those.

It could take a long time though. My mother is very ill and it often caused her to be admitted to the hospital and sometimes to a rest home with physical therapy for a short time thereafter. Every SINGLE time she went to the hospital, she got pneumonia. Finally, she has a nurse to visit her home and a doctor in emergency circumstances.

She got a hip replacement about 3 years ago. Something went wrong, it got infected while in the hospital. She went to a 'rest home' where she had a machine attached to her leg to give it air or somesuch, so it didn;t get infected.

The aides there did not know how to work the machine. I finally got them to call the manufacturer of the machine. Too late. The hip implant was removed, she got a 'implant infused with antiobiotics'. Never worked. 2 years later, still infected.

Now. they tell her she may lose her leg because during hospitalizations, the gave her extra antibiotics and used a compression tight or sock- not to be used on her condition.

She cannot have other surgery she needed, due to the infection. This is 3 + years of infection.

Superbug, I say YEP.

She is 64. Not elderly by any means. She looks 54.
edit on 26-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:26 PM
link   
a reply to: reldra

there was a thread about some new way to fight infections with something in breast milk.....this is something that is needed



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:30 PM
link   
a reply to: reldra

Good bacteria to fight bad viruses/other bacteria. I don't know all the technicalities of it, was talking to a buddy of mine that while going to school worked in the lab that did some work on it.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:01 PM
link   
I haven't had an anti biotic in like 30 years and im OK.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: AmericanRealist

But before antibiotics we weren't causing the same bugs to evolve into bigger and badder versions. And I think before nano bots we are going to see bacteria being used to fight off bugs.


Bugs as in viruses or bugs that crawl around? Or using one bacteria to fight another?


I imagine he's talking about phage. Not Phage, but phage.

You're going to have to get people used to the thought of being infected with a virus to cure a bacterial infection. And you have to update phage constantly - what works this month may not next month. So there would have to be a change in how we approve drugs.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:07 PM
link   
a reply to: tinner07

Almost 40 years for me.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:13 PM
link   
Brilacidin is going into final testing. And while they're characterizing it as being used for skin infections by Gram positive bacteria, in fact, it's very active against most bacteria and bacterial infections, whether Gram negative or positive, and is also effective against some mycobacteria, fungi and protists. Other variants on the basic Brilacidin structure are primarily fungicidal or are active against protozoa or mycoplasmas.

And the best part is that bacteria can't become immune to it.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:31 PM
link   
We can thank all the whiners that run to the Dr every time they have the sniffels for this. And the idiot Drs that prescribe antibiotics just to shut them up.
I actually has a sister in law that would go to the Dr every time she or one of the kids got a runny nose and throw a fit till the Dr gave her a script for antibiotics. He would, like many, give them to her just to get rid of her, so her could stop wasting time and get on to the next patient. Antibacterial soaps have a share of the blame also. We never used that junk and my kids and I have perfectly healthy immune systems and almost never get sick. I'm talking a cold every few years, if even that. You need to be exposed to a few germs, so your body can learn to fight it. This "gotta kill every germ in sight" attitude has led to weaker immune systems and goes hand in hand, helping these bugs get a better hold.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:44 PM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic

The DEFENSE dept? : blinks :

I have a close family member who was diagnosed with a CRE by the Mayo Clinic.

She cannot have dental work done for fear of getting infectious endocarditis.



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 02:01 AM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic

I'm not so sure some rogue state didn't invent this. I remember back from the anthrax attacks that weaponized anthrax is bred in a lab to be antibiotic resistant. I don't think our government would do this though, we're not starving or overpopulated or something so there is no motive. Or maybe a pharma company invented it and the cure to make money. Just some speculation.



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 02:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: NewzNose
a reply to: neoholographic

The DEFENSE dept? : blinks :



You can thank them for Brilacidin too. It was initially a DARPA project, intended to provide a very broad spectrum antibiotic with a huge effective dose range, and no possibility of the bacteria developing resistance.

That way, if you felt as if one of your soldiers was infected with something in the field but had no way to do lab work, you could just shoot them up with it and not worry about anything.

eta: you can also just spray it in cuts, or use it to disinfect surgical tools in the field. Or gargle it, or use it as eye or ear drops. Or a foot soak for infected blisters. It's like Breakfree CLP for people.
edit on 27-5-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 11:01 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

Will Brilacidin kill a CRE?



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 05:37 PM
link   
a reply to: neoholographic


The problem here is"That for every action their is an equal and opposite reaction" This is true just about everywhere outside of physics as well. If the Cattle are put in feeding pens, and are given the animal form of human antibiotics to stop disease spreading in their unnatural state. Then the "equal and opposite reaction", is the breeding of a drug resistant strain of bacteria. Its not rocket science to realise any intervention on the natural status quo, will provide some completely un thought of surprise.



new topics




 
7
<<   2 >>

log in

join