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America's most expensive weapons system ever just hit another snag (F-35)

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posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:21 PM
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I really do hate reading about all the problems with the F-35. It appears now that the March 2017 combat readiness date will be pushed back until sometime in 2018 but I would not bet even then it will be a bug free combat ready aircraft. The one aircraft for the Navy, Air Force, and Marines with the commonality of parts looked good on paper but the aircraft with their different configurations for each service has also not worked out as once thought.

uk.businessinsider.com...


America's most expensive weapons system ever just hit another snag.

The F-35 Lightning II, Lockheed Martin's fifth-generation fighter jet, is expected to miss another crucial deadline on its march to combat readiness.

On Tuesday, the Pentagon acknowledged that the jet would stumble pass its operational testing phase.

"The target was the middle of 2017, but it's clear we're not going to make that," Frank Kendall, the Pentagon's top acquisition officer, said.

The new schedule date, according to Kendall, is likely to occur in 2018.

The mid-2017 target was itself a postponement because of setbacks with the F-35's sixth and final software release, referred to as Block 3F.

The Block 3F software is part of the 8 million lines of sophisticated software code that underpin the F-35.

If the code fails, the F-35 fails.




posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:33 PM
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Switch to a Mac...
Cheers



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

It was known that it was going to slip when they had to make adjustments to the current software. It's not another snag, it's related to the one that showed up a couple months ago. It's interesting to note that the problems being seen are only in the A model. The Marines aren't seeing anything like they've seen with the A.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

my goodness! With this level of SNAFU's for a single program, I am starting to believe there may be sabotage involved. Scary thing is could be from outside or from within. There are a handful of reasons the sabotage could be from within. It could be an effort to keep sapping money out of the budget since were in so deep it would be counter productive to stop now. Perhaps a shady Senator or house rep is involved?

Foreign motivations are obvious.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
I really do hate reading about all the problems with the F-35. It appears now that the March 2017 combat readiness date will be pushed back until sometime in 2018 but I would not bet even then it will be a bug free combat ready aircraft. The one aircraft for the Navy, Air Force, and Marines with the commonality of parts looked good on paper but the aircraft with their different configurations for each service has also not worked out as once thought.

uk.businessinsider.com...


America's most expensive weapons system ever just hit another snag.

The F-35 Lightning II, Lockheed Martin's fifth-generation fighter jet, is expected to miss another crucial deadline on its march to combat readiness.

On Tuesday, the Pentagon acknowledged that the jet would stumble pass its operational testing phase.

"The target was the middle of 2017, but it's clear we're not going to make that," Frank Kendall, the Pentagon's top acquisition officer, said.

The new schedule date, according to Kendall, is likely to occur in 2018.

The mid-2017 target was itself a postponement because of setbacks with the F-35's sixth and final software release, referred to as Block 3F.

The Block 3F software is part of the 8 million lines of sophisticated software code that underpin the F-35.

If the code fails, the F-35 fails.



Well, it was supposed to be combat ready in 2015, and when is wasn't there were those who said wouldn't be ready until 2022 never mind 2018, then there are curious FAQ videos 'countering' the questions of what it cannot do floating around...I don't care really, the money is gone and in someone's pocket and there is feck all you can do about it....like a lot of things.


I should say thanks for the good info though.
edit on 26-5-2016 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

It's the most advanced aircraft ever built. It makes the F-22 look like something built in the 80s by comparison. It's not easy to make everything it's supposed to do work well together on the first try.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

No not sabotage often programmes have a lot of bugs today for example the VTOL Osprey is a great aircraft but it had a bunch of crashes and killed a few on the way



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: 727Sky

It was known that it was going to slip when they had to make adjustments to the current software. It's not another snag, it's related to the one that showed up a couple months ago. It's interesting to note that the problems being seen are only in the A model. The Marines aren't seeing anything like they've seen with the A.


That is weird for I figured the software was mostly common on all aircraft and if anyone would be seeing problems it would be with the VSTOL Marine bird.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

They're using an earlier version of the 3I software than the Air Force is. The Air Force uses a patched version of 3I which is the one that has the problem.



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
BSOD takes on a whole new level of meanings in this application.
Serves them right for using WinME for their OS....

edit on C2016vAmerica/ChicagoThu, 26 May 2016 20:07:12 -050031PM8America/Chicago5 by CovertAgenda because: add



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:19 PM
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Integrity real time operating system


Lockheed Martin is using Green Hills Software's INTEGRITY®-178B RTOS and AdaMULTI™ IDE to develop safety-critical and security-critical software for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF).

Lockheed Martin's design for the JSF was selected by the Department of Defense (DoD) in a $200 billion award, the largest in US DoD history. Avionics software developed by Lockheed Martin is running on INTEGRITY-178B in multiple airborne, Power Architecture-based systems.

Link



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 08:48 PM
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An interview with Green Hills Software's CTO David Kleidermacher: EAL6+ certification boosts confidence for Green Hills, world's security

A couple of points from the the interview...

VME: So this is the highest level of EAL certification earned in the industry so far.

KLEIDERMACHER: Yeah, no oneís even come close to it. So for EAL4, even EAL5, itís all informal or semiformal kinds of analysis, and the rigor for development process and testing is far less. There are no formal methods required until you get to EAL6 and 7. So INTEGRITY-178B is not just the first operating system but the first software product thatís ever been certified at this level.

VME: So can you tell us briefly about these "formal methods"?

KLEIDERMACHER: The formal methods are actually a mathematical proof of the security policy. The operating system is formally modeled and thereís a security policy that has to be enforced by the system, and we actually formally prove it, using modern theorem proving techniques. This provides an incredible level of assurance – itís awesome because basically it means that every line of kernel code has been mathematically analyzed.

VME: Practically speaking, what kind of security threats does INTEGRITY-178B prevent?

KLEIDERMACHER: If you look at general-purpose OSs – I donít want to pick on Windows or Linux, so just imagine any general-purpose OS – how do security problems arise? They usually result from vulnerabilities in the actual product itself. And so by having this level of assurance – by having the formal methods and the level of testing and design – we essentially say "There are no defects in there" and so thereís no surface area for an attacker to go after.




posted on May, 26 2016 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: AmericanRealist

It's the most advanced aircraft ever built. It makes the F-22 look like something built in the 80s by comparison. It's not easy to make everything it's supposed to do work well together on the first try.


Support this project come hell or high water if you see fit but the project is now far removed from the first try. The actual JSF development contract was signed on 16 November 1996. and the F35's First flight was 15 December 2006. First try? Not at this point.



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 02:41 AM
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a reply to: CharlesT

The F-22 was selected in 1991 and flew in 1997. We're at the point where it's going to be 8-10 years plus between selection and first flight of the actual design simply due to the complexity.



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: AmericanRealist
a reply to: 727Sky

my goodness! With this level of SNAFU's for a single program, I am starting to believe there may be sabotage involved. Scary thing is could be from outside or from within. There are a handful of reasons the sabotage could be from within. It could be an effort to keep sapping money out of the budget since were in so deep it would be counter productive to stop now. Perhaps a shady Senator or house rep is involved?

Foreign motivations are obvious.


It is an effective way to stall. When you have a slow program with many little problems and can say, as they have said, that it will take until 2020 before they can get the software for the cannon worked out, then you know that something is screwy. It is a stalling tactic.

The F-35 will probably be the last manned, jet fighter that the US will build. Why? because they have something better, the supreme weapon bar none, the better craft are called the black triangles. They are the result of reversed engineering on the power plants of the genuine UFOs.

The black triangles literally do not use air to move. They will eventually replace all types of aircraft once they get beyond being weapons of war (or better said, the prevention of war). With them in play in the background, the wrangling over the pros, cons and sheer worthiness of the F-35 are an orchestrated side show for the public and our adversaries.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: AmericanRealist
a reply to: 727Sky

my goodness! With this level of SNAFU's for a single program, I am starting to believe there may be sabotage involved. Scary thing is could be from outside or from within. There are a handful of reasons the sabotage could be from within. It could be an effort to keep sapping money out of the budget since were in so deep it would be counter productive to stop now. Perhaps a shady Senator or house rep is involved?

Foreign motivations are obvious.


That is the problem with today's vehicles. They rely on sophisticated technology that isn't really needed.
Computers isn't everything. Are they trying to install an autopilot system on that jet or what?



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: makemap

Computers are required if you want everything to work together, or for that matter to work at all.



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Once upon a time the pilots did that.....



posted on May, 30 2016 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

They also didn't have things like IRST, DAS, and aircraft capable of 50 degrees AoA.



posted on May, 31 2016 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I thought the russkies did, back in the 80's, with the Mig 29.....




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