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Why do you love (or hate) Japan ? (for those who have gone to Japan!)

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posted on May, 24 2016 @ 02:53 AM
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What i love about Japan :

1. The people are nice, super polite, and respect my privacy.

2. Smart toilet. The toilet can warm my butt, play fake flushing sounds or nature sounds when i was taking a dump XD

3. Modern & traditional get along well.

4. Each town brings out their uniqueness, like different Bento, different town mascot, etc.

5. Everything works! No broken telephone, no broken toilet, everything's perfectly maintained.

6. Punctuality as its best. As if all bus drivers in Japan's afraid of missing their bus stop schedule XD

7. Not a single restaurant sells o.k food, all is incredibly delicious. As if people are afraid of opening restaurant with so-so quality.

The only thing i hate about Japan is Kawaguchiko area in Fuji, it's fulled of tourists and tourist trap.
edit on 24-5-2016 by aphon because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 24 2016 @ 03:08 AM
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I plan on going some day.

I quite enjoy this guys videos, very informative and amusing.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 03:22 AM
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I lived in Japan for three years when I was in the Navy the only thing I didn't like there was the openly racist policies they practiced. The amount of times I tried to go to a bar or restaurant only to be denied with the phase "Japanese only" with them crossing their arms to make an x were numerous. I know what you were thinking I must have stumbled across private clubs or Yakuza hangouts no they were just regular businesses that didn't want white people in it. They are very xenophobic.
edit on 3912016xMay000000Tuesday24America/ChicagoTue, 24 May 2016 03:23:05 -0500 by BoxFulder because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 03:36 AM
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a reply to: aphon

I have never been to Japan but both my step-daughters went to school there. The loved the food and culture, BUT, whenever travelling to school they were GROPED daily on trains by the local men....



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 03:42 AM
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a reply to: BoxFulder

those gents misprise am'ricans,



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 03:52 AM
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The worst thing about Japan was the language barrier.
Not one person I encountered spoke English. It was so difficult sometimes.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 04:02 AM
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originally posted by: BoxFulder
I lived in Japan for three years when I was in the Navy the only thing I didn't like there was the openly racist policies they practiced. The amount of times I tried to go to a bar or restaurant only to be denied with the phase "Japanese only" with them crossing their arms to make an x were numerous. I know what you were thinking I must have stumbled across private clubs or Yakuza hangouts no they were just regular businesses that didn't want white people in it. They are very xenophobic.


I also know in Japan there are some onsen who say "Japanese only". However i understand that for this reason :
Japanese clean their genital with water thoroughly until it's cleaned (like i do actually), while many foreigners dont.

I can understand this.. i dont want to be naked in the same jacuzzi or bathtub with naked people who probably still have a little poo and urine on their genital..



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 04:03 AM
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originally posted by: Iamnotadoctor
The worst thing about Japan was the language barrier.
Not one person I encountered spoke English. It was so difficult sometimes.



Yupp thats right, however all of them always tried to help as much as they can when i was there eventhough they cant understand english very well.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 04:14 AM
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a reply to: aphon

Answering on behalf of someone else.

Because it's clean and tidy.

Small scale crime is rare.

People are polite, though racism is an issue.

The food.

The work ethic is incredible. The big quake struck when my source was at the top of an office block. The shaking had stopped by the time he finally made it down the stairs and out. He said people with families went home, but the single people went straight back in and tidied up the offices.

The best story I heard of Japanese efficiency was about a guy who phoned home after the quake and was told there was a burst water main outside his house. It was fixed by the time he got home.

I'm told the big secret is everything is 'face'. Peel away the facade and everything is held together with chewing gum and string.
edit on 24 5 2016 by Kester because: (no reason given)

edit on 24 5 2016 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 04:34 AM
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1. Lack of homeless people, they take care of their own there

2. Work ethic, even at McDonalds they work hard

3. Everything is so advanced, even their vending machines are futuristic

4. Technology available the moment it's developed, outdated the next week

5. Discipline. Shops leave stuff out overnight and it doesn't get stolen, kids don't buy liquor from vending machines, etc

6. Every white person becomes an instant celebrity!



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 04:55 AM
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a reply to: BoxFulder

I think it's just that with all the crap going on in western nations, the whole Multiculturalism thing scares them so they are hell bent on protecting their Heritage from being over run by foreigners and rightfully so.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 05:11 AM
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1. Japan provides national health insurance to all its people and long term residents and permanent residents. No 5K deductibles either. You pay between 10 and 30% of the bill at the time of service.
2. Japan has bicycle lanes/sidewalks most everywhere. I can go from Yamaguchi city to Shimoneseki all by bicycle lanes.
3. Food is fairly cheap other then meat. But then again I've seen the price of beef in the States, not cheap no more.
4. Decent rents can be had for about $550 a month. (of course, depends on location)
5. Govt. housing is strictly controlled. No gang bang'n or Yakusa can be allowed in. Very strict.
6. Welfare is still pretty much looked down upon.
7. Self employment offers a chance to make it in this country, just have to follow the rules. (business owner for over 20 years here)
8. Countryside living is better if you are a foreigner and offers a lot of freedom to sightsee the old way of Japan.

NOW IF YOU REALLY WANT TO HEAR AND SEE THE TRUTH ABOUT CITY LIVING AND RURAL LIVING, READ THIS ON A DAILY BASIS.

www.tokyoreporter.com...

Japan's cities are not all that safe, but I feel where I live, I can walk to 7-11 at 2 am in the morning and I don't even think of "fear".



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 05:12 AM
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a reply to: aphon
It made understanding/navigating the rail system so tough.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

It's more difficult than hongkong, singapore, and other places with MRT/MTR, but i found railway map did make it easier to navigate. I also asked around when i couldnt find sign to the correct train platform since i read nor speak zero Japanese, and people always helped me out. Another thing i love about Japanese people, everywhere theyre helpful people when i was there. There even was a girl, on busy hour in the morning, who accompanied me and my family to the correct train even without we asked.

Oh, i forgot.

No. 8. The work ethic, like what Sargon and Kester said. It seems that Japanese employees feel confused when they got nothing to do, lol. They do work really hard.

No.9. *how could i have forgotten* Vending machine's everywhere! Even at farms. lol

And another thing i dont really like about Japan :
2. Conservative men treat women like slave, i stayed at traditional ryokan for a few days, all the men looked sharp while working behind the desk, while the women did everything from picking up heavy luggage to cleaning the floor.
edit on 24-5-2016 by aphon because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-5-2016 by aphon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: musicismagic
1. Japan provides national health insurance to all its people and long term residents and permanent residents. No 5K deductibles either. You pay between 10 and 30% of the bill at the time of service.
2. Japan has bicycle lanes/sidewalks most everywhere. I can go from Yamaguchi city to Shimoneseki all by bicycle lanes.
3. Food is fairly cheap other then meat. But then again I've seen the price of beef in the States, not cheap no more.
4. Decent rents can be had for about $550 a month. (of course, depends on location)
5. Govt. housing is strictly controlled. No gang bang'n or Yakusa can be allowed in. Very strict.
6. Welfare is still pretty much looked down upon.
7. Self employment offers a chance to make it in this country, just have to follow the rules. (business owner for over 20 years here)
8. Countryside living is better if you are a foreigner and offers a lot of freedom to sightsee the old way of Japan.

NOW IF YOU REALLY WANT TO HEAR AND SEE THE TRUTH ABOUT CITY LIVING AND RURAL LIVING, READ THIS ON A DAILY BASIS.

www.tokyoreporter.com...

Japan's cities are not all that safe, but I feel where I live, I can walk to 7-11 at 2 am in the morning and I don't even think of "fear".


WOW youre so lucky to be able to live there for 20 years +++. How did you start opening a business in Japan ?

Btw i also agree that countryside's better, i noticed the people in small towns're friendlier than the people in big city like Tokyo. For those who like nightlife and metropolitan atmosphere i think would prefer Tokyo (karaoke, robot cafe, skyscrappers night lights, shopping, etc), but to me countrysides are more unique and beautiful with many flowers and that each town has local characteristic like Wasabi in Matsumoto, best wagyu beef in Kobe, etc.
edit on 24-5-2016 by aphon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 06:05 AM
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originally posted by: aphon

originally posted by: musicismagic
1. Japan provides national health insurance to all its people and long term residents and permanent residents. No 5K deductibles either. You pay between 10 and 30% of the bill at the time of service.
2. Japan has bicycle lanes/sidewalks most everywhere. I can go from Yamaguchi city to Shimoneseki all by bicycle lanes.
3. Food is fairly cheap other then meat. But then again I've seen the price of beef in the States, not cheap no more.
4. Decent rents can be had for about $550 a month. (of course, depends on location)
5. Govt. housing is strictly controlled. No gang bang'n or Yakusa can be allowed in. Very strict.
6. Welfare is still pretty much looked down upon.
7. Self employment offers a chance to make it in this country, just have to follow the rules. (business owner for over 20 years here)
8. Countryside living is better if you are a foreigner and offers a lot of freedom to sightsee the old way of Japan.

NOW IF YOU REALLY WANT TO HEAR AND SEE THE TRUTH ABOUT CITY LIVING AND RURAL LIVING, READ THIS ON A DAILY BASIS.

www.tokyoreporter.com...

Japan's cities are not all that safe, but I feel where I live, I can walk to 7-11 at 2 am in the morning and I don't even think of "fear".


WOW youre so lucky to be able to live there for 20 years +++. How did you start opening a business in Japan ?





Back in the 70's I married a Japanese gal in Tokyo. In the early 90's we opened a "juku" school. And expanded it to over 5 locations with some teachers from England. But these days the "English juku conversation schools" are everywhere and competition is tough. I think there still is opportunity for such a business, but now many local governments offer free programs in the communities. The teachers are volunteers also. Tough times for the most part, the good ole days are long gone now for this type of business, but I encourage anyone that wants to try, go for it. Starting a business, one just goes to the city office and then follow the rules. And obey them.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

And i suppose excelent fluency in Japanese speaking, writing, and reading is a must too?



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 06:22 AM
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originally posted by: aphon
a reply to: musicismagic

And i suppose excelent fluency in Japanese speaking, writing, and reading is a must too?


If you can't speak or write the language, yes, it would be difficult, but many Indians here have opened up Indian restaurants recently and they have limited language skills that I can tell of.



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

I really want to open a business and start my life in Japan in the future. From whom can i get help with that matter, any suggestions ? How much money do i need *approximately* to open a small restaurant ?
edit on 24-5-2016 by aphon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2016 @ 06:44 AM
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originally posted by: aphon
a reply to: musicismagic

I really want to open a business and start my life in Japan in the future. From whom can i get help with that matter, any suggestions ? How much money do i need *approximately* to open a small restaurant ?



Start with the Japanese Embassy that is in your country/State. Ask them for the best directions to follow to get to Japan and start a business.

Also join this forum. www.jref.com...

Lots of good people on it and you probably can get some real good advice. Also join LinkedIn.com



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