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Japanese knotweed lyme disease cure?

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posted on May, 21 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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Well I am stoked to find out this invasive stand of bamboo like plants is not only edible but contains the highest concentration of reservatrol found in nature. I've been pickling the shoots for a few years and those make a great substitute for asparagus. How many other people on here actively search for 'weeds' to eat?





posted on May, 21 2016 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: Onthebit

Japanese knotweed, outside of its native environment, is a menace. It is highly invasive. In the UK it's a disaster for indigenous flora.

If this type of video encourages ignorance through the plants spread, then that's sad. The commentator makes it sound like the coverall solution to loads of medical problems. He even says "there is no such thing as invasive plants", which is just extraordinary ignorance. It is a disaster plant!

That said, it has nutritional value and has proven medicinal value as it contains oxalic acid - just like rhubarb. In fact, stick to rhubarb and save the environment.

Local advice
UK Gov advice to prevent knotweed spread
Telegrapgh article



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

rexresearch.com...

I happen to disagree. By harvesting the plant you keep it in check. You can get your meds from big pharma if you wish and I won't get into the planetary devastation caused by production methods. I will learn to use what mother nature provides. Everything we need is already provided. Thanks for your thoughts though.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: Onthebit

You are both correct but in the UK it is a known hazzard that destroy's foundations on ancient building's, devalues house's and actually should not be here, it was brought by human's to the UK and is thought to have been used in Japanese ornamental gardan's which were popular for a time in the 1800's then to have spread in part as it seemed to like the railway's which once ran everywhere in the UK, in Japan it has natural predators and is naturally kept in balance but here it is out of balance with nature and has no natural predator's.

In the UK there are many invasive species though ranging from soil worm's, arachnid's and insects to plant's and tree's.

But a few people can never keep this is check here, it is too fast growing, strangles the native plant's and ruin's building's both old and new.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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I made a salad in the woods with dandelions, mushrooms, blackberries, and a rattlesnake.
It was delicious.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 12:41 PM
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Will check into that.

Cannabis oil is supposed to work with all mectoplasma infections, such as lymes, chronic fatigue, thyroid issues, fibromalgia, and all those gulf war horrors, mechanized virus's that infect whole families with various conditions.

Mycoplasma Bacteria Tied To Chronic Illness.pdf



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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Replying to subscribe as on my ph. Haven't got time to watch video yet but am always interested in plants that heal. Just got rid of wart like thing on my neck with milkweed. They say it grows where people need it.
We have plenty of invasive species of animal and plants introduced where I live. Some of them were brought here to get rid of another introduced species and became a pest them selves.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

i just made a salad in the woods with :

a rotting badger
some helock
a splsah of EP90 gear oil
a squirrel turd
an african american baby
and a some gravel

it was delicious



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

I agree, Plants have an intelligence we don't understand yet. These 'invasive weeds' were brought to the new world as food and medicine...people knew how to use mother nature to feed themselves. Now we have the grocery store with their processed food products and chemical laden produce and BIG PHARMA. So now those once life saving plants are called weeds...dandelion, chicory, pigweed......etc, etc, etc. Who do you think made this decision???



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767

Yes, I can understand it has got out of control there. When we moved here I had no idea what it was and it had already ruined the foundation in an outbuilding. Since I have begun to harvest the last few years the stand is getting smaller and my pantry fuller.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: Onthebit
I happen to disagree. By harvesting the plant you keep it in check.


Some plants are so invasive that they go out of control. Japanese knotweed is one such plant. Once planted it is virtually impossible to remove, so once the "harvester" has moved on, or lost control, the native flora is doomed.

People have great ideas for introducing animals and plants into places where they don't belong. Whether it's the cane toad in Australia, Himalayan balsam in the UK, the or a hundred other examples, introduced species have a habit of destroying environments as they out-compete native flora and fauna, because they have no natural competition. Japanese knotweed is one such plant.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: Onthebit
a reply to: paraphi

rexresearch.com...

I happen to disagree. By harvesting the plant you keep it in check. You can get your meds from big pharma if you wish and I won't get into the planetary devastation caused by production methods. I will learn to use what mother nature provides. Everything we need is already provided. Thanks for your thoughts though.


Plants like this need to be banned.

Not because they have medical potential but because they ruin the environment. Everyone says 'oh I'm different, I'll keep it under control' but someone always stuffs up and the thing gets loose.

You should see what introduced species have done to various environments.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 10:14 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
a reply to: Onthebit

Japanese knotweed, outside of its native environment, is a menace. It is highly invasive. In the UK it's a disaster for indigenous flora.

If this type of video encourages ignorance through the plants spread, then that's sad. The commentator makes it sound like the coverall solution to loads of medical problems. He even says "there is no such thing as invasive plants", which is just extraordinary ignorance. It is a disaster plant!

That said, it has nutritional value and has proven medicinal value as it contains oxalic acid - just like rhubarb. In fact, stick to rhubarb and save the environment.

Local advice
UK Gov advice to prevent knotweed spread
Telegrapgh article


Now, oxalic acid in small amounts is beneficial to the body, but there are a lot of bad things that consuming things high in it can cause for many people. All you need to do is eat some green beans to get what you need.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 11:49 PM
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a reply to: Onthebit

Ground Elder,Stinging Nettles and now this.Yummy!Food everywhere!

I've had this in my garden-in the first house I owned eleven years ago-it's a nightmare to get rid of.



posted on May, 22 2016 @ 12:24 AM
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SPAM REMOVED BY ADMIN
edit on May 22nd 2016 by Djarums because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2016 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: Ericthedoubter

WTF people.....I moved here 10 yrs ago and there already was a stand of what I thought was bamboo even though that was unlikely given the climate. Instead of going ape # and throwing nukes at the invasive nature of the plant I started to learn more about it. Over the years I learned ever more ways to enjoy such a food source. Stinging nettles and pig weed used to be my favourite natural edibles but now I am most impressed with 'pickled' (salt ferment) knotweed. Finding out that the root is harvested by pharma to sell back to sick people is the icing on the cake for me.

Mother nature provides everything we need......too bad science says no......

btw read the article I posted......



posted on May, 26 2016 @ 09:16 PM
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Just a couple questions...
1. Where is the Lyme disease connection, does resveratrol cure Lyme disease?
2. Are the health benefits of this plant legit?

Now as for it being an invasive species, it has the potential to ruin ecosystems. I've got asian beetles in my area(another invasive species) killing tons of trees. I had one tree branch at least a few hundred pounds in weight, crush my garage due to invasive species killing it. Several massive trees near my house are dead now and ready to come down.

I don't know much about this plant, but I see no harm in harvesting it if it was already planted, although it would probably be a good idea to control it's growth. Other than that is there a way to grow it in a controlled environment like a greenhouse or will it literally jump to nearby soil? Will it spread like dandelions? How bad of a pest is this thing?



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23



Interesting.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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That stuff growing around your house,you can look forward to the value going right down and a very expensive clean-up bill.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 05:12 PM
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originally posted by: zinc12
That stuff growing around your house,you can look forward to the value going right down and a very expensive clean-up bill.


No worries, because you can add it to salads and make knot-weed tea. Surely that's a consolation?



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