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Sonic Sea

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posted on May, 19 2016 @ 09:53 PM
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Watching this documentary about the creatures of the oceans and the effects from sonar.

It's sad to watch the effects and damage caused to these mammals swimming in the oceans.
Very imformative and interesting to finally learn the real truth.



Sonic Sea ( www.sonicsea.org... ) is a 60-minute documentary about the impact of industrial and military ocean noise on whales and other marine life. It tells the story of a former U.S. Navy officer who solved a tragic mystery and changed forever the way we understand our impact on the ocean. The film is narrated by Rachel McAdams and features Sting, in addition to the renowned ocean experts Dr. Sylvia Earle, Dr. Paul Spong, Dr. Christopher Clark and Jean-Michel Cousteau. Sonic Sea was produced by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Imaginary Forces in association with the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Diamond Docs.




Just adding some more info on this film for those who can not watch it.



SONIC SEA travels beneath the ocean's surface to uncover the damaging consequences of increased ocean noise pollution and what can be done to stop it. Narrated by Academy Award-nominated actress Rachel McAdams and featuring interviews with marine ecologists, ocean life experts, and wildlife activists, including Grammy-Award winning musician, human rights and environmental activist Sting, SONIC SEA highlights how noise from a range of man-made sources has affected whales in recent years, including the mass stranding of whales around the planet. The film uncovers how better ship design, speed limits for large ships, quieter methods for underwater resource exploration, and exclusion zones for sonar training can work to reduce the noise in our oceans and stop the deaths of our ocean's beloved creatures, as long as society has "the political will to solve it."


www.discovery.com...
edit on 19-5-2016 by Onesmartdog because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 19 2016 @ 11:13 PM
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Its awful, we are killing everything. We could at least designate shipping lanes to stay within. Give the ocean animals 90% of the oceans. WE FAIL AT EVERYTHING. The word Harmony comes to mind, too bad we don't strive for it.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 02:22 AM
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a reply to: Onesmartdog

Sadly with all our concrete etc etc we have lost touch with the animal kingdom which is an integral part of this planet's eco system. In fact for many we are so cocooned in our home - car - work - shop environments unless we have a garden or park etc we only drive by the countryside - so its hardly a wonder unless something drastically changes this has happened.

I had no idea about the sea creatures. Great thread and I will try to watch the video to learn more.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 02:39 AM
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It is so very sad to see the things that we as humans have caused or created around the world. It never changes.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 02:42 AM
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Seems like the animals were not ... Fast enough to escape the noise.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 09:09 AM
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Surely they will adapt

Evolution will make sure the fittest will survive, don't worry



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
Surely they will adapt

Evolution will make sure the fittest will survive, don't worry


Whales don't breed that fast. Orcas carry a baby for 17 months. Sperm whales take 19 months. They stay with their mother for a year, then it's another 15 years before they are able to start mating.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
Surely they will adapt

Evolution will make sure the fittest will survive, don't worry


I doubt it.



Active sonar, the transmission equipment used on some ships to assist with navigation, is detrimental to the health and livelihood of some marine animals.[1] Research has recently shown that beaked and blue whales are sensitive to mid-frequency active sonar and move rapidly away from the source of the sonar, a response that disrupts their feeding and can cause mass strandings.[2] Some marine animals, such as whales and dolphins, use echolocation or "biosonar" systems to locate predators and prey. It is conjectured that active sonar transmitters could confuse these animals and interfere with basic biological functions such as feeding and mating. Study has shown whales experience decompression sickness, a disease that forces nitrogen into gas bubbles in the tissues and is caused by rapid and prolonged surfacing. Although whales were originally thought to be immune to this disease, sonar has been implicated in causing behavioral changes that can lead to decompression sickness.[3]


en.wikipedia.org...



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