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EgyptAir flight from Paris to Cairo has vanished from Radar

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posted on May, 28 2016 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

The smoke detection system is sensitive to dust and certain aerosols. They found that from like 1990 and that incident, there had been something like 64 alarms for smoke in the bay. Of those something like 43 were false alarms. They upgraded to an optical system that reduced the alarms, but didn't eliminate them.




posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom
False alarm associated with avionics malfunction.
avherald.com...



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: Phage

In most of the false alarms they found that it was the detector itself. There wasn't a corresponding event. The detector was picking up dust and alarming.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

In this case though, there were multiple avionics failures?



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: Phage

It's hard to tell which came first. The crew reported smoke, and then instrument failures, but the NTSB reported that the failures were a result of the smoke checklist. They definitely lost multiple systems though.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

On Apr 7th the NTSB said the crew recalled receiving an auto-throttle related ECAM message while climbing through 4000 feet shortly followed by an avionics smoke warning with the instruction to land. Despite this message neither crew recalled smelling smoke or fumes during the flight.

avherald.com...



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I'll look for the NTSB report later on and see what it said. Regardless, there was a false and systems went out. One of the systems that apparently can be shut down is flight control related.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:19 PM
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I would think that anything along the route of the wiring or equipment it connects with could cause the alarm.
edit on 5/28/2016 by roadgravel because: typo



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

For a real alarm it detects any smoke in the bay. The problem is false alarms. The crew is trained that when it alarms they follow a specific checklist which results in systems being shut down.

They also don't practice it often. Pilots complained that they only got to practice in the simulator every couple of years or so.

Supposedly, according to comments by Airbus after the United incident in 2011, the primary detection system for smoke was the crew seeing or smelling smoke in the cockpit.
edit on 5/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

understood. I was referring to a false alarm situation due to a failure in the hardware.



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Agit8dChop

when did this happen I don't have cable TV



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

And you DO know galley alarms are turned way down, right? They're problematic, burnt coffee, toast...stuff.

Hence the lack of an alarm in the galley, and a full on alarm in the lav. Damn smokers! Right?

How long will this go on where we will ignore it? Oh yeah sure, we're interested, but how long will this go on avoiding the obvious???

I will go easy tonight, but...why?????

Why, Zaphod...why?



posted on May, 28 2016 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Because I believe in these things called facts. I know you find them inconvenient and have already made up your mind, but I'm a firm believer in them.

Just for you though, I'll stop posting here and let you have your victory and keep going on about how you know you're right regardless of what the facts show.


edit on 5/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/28/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 06:45 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

My post wasn't actually directed at you, even though I asked a question at the end. It was really more rhetorical.

I don't KNOW what happened to MS 804 any more than anyone else does. It just seems odd they've talked about everything but the items I've been bringing up and it doesn't make a lot of sense.



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well aware of false alarms ......

Get them all the time . Lot of false alarms triggered by dust - Saturday mornings often have someone sawing drywall

Get a shock (and fine) when all them big red trucks show up!!

Another thing is fog/condensation tripping alarms

One item mentioned is sudden cabin depressurization - resulting in condensation which triggered fire alarms

I



posted on May, 29 2016 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58




Supposedly, according to comments by Airbus after the United incident in 2011, the primary detection system for smoke was the crew seeing or smelling smoke in the cockpit.


On Swiss Air pilots didnt notice smoke (IIRC) until shut down a fan which was blowing smoke/flame away from cockpit

When shut off fan the smoke/fire was drawn into the cockpit blinding the pilots



posted on May, 31 2016 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: firerescue

this article came out today

www.theguardian.com...

Locator beacon was picked up by satellites in minutes after Airbus A320 carrying 66 people disappeared from radar over Mediterranean

they are using this to narrow the search



posted on May, 31 2016 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: research100


Unbelievable how long this search is taking! You'd think that this flight was lost in the Indian Ocean in 12,000 feet of water, like the Malaysia 370 flight was.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 07:43 AM
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Egypt and France have signed agreements with two French companies specialising in deep water searches, Alseamar and Deep Ocean Search (DOS).


A good bit of the delay, getting the money making arranged?


Three of Alseamar’s Detector-6000 acoustic detection systems, which submerged can detect pings at 4,000m to 5,000m below sea level, have left the French island of Corsica on board the Laplace, a French navy ship.


Didn't say what day it left.


“But the DOS specialised ship left the Irish sea on Saturday and it will reach the perceived crash site [after around] 12 days, after having the Egyptian and French investigators embark in Alexandria.”


Must have been May 28.



posted on Jun, 1 2016 @ 08:05 AM
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Seems a French ship recently received singals from at least on of the pingers.
They are waiting for a second vessel which has an ROV or something on board.

www.bbc.com...




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