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Intelligence Gathering - Determining Who Has Two-Way Radios

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posted on May, 17 2016 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: InTheLight
a reply to: Gazrok

If I started CBing now, I would then get to know the community within my location, so I could then just rely on those people and any new strangers would be scrutinized (after SHTF)

barc.ca...


I know this post was directed toward Gazrok, but I thought I'd chime in here.

This is one of my considerations for studying the idea and getting setup now before the SHTF. If the local radio operators could agree on a highly localized slang that used coded words and phrases that only other locals would know, then outsiders would have trouble understanding the over the air communications when they are listening in. If they tried to infiltrate the communications, they would probably stick out like a sore thumb in such a case.

Also, by using protocols, like switching frequencies, predetermined communication times, using their own call signs, using special jargon, and meeting in person when the airwaves get too hot, the network could function with predators monitoring the air waves.




posted on May, 18 2016 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

I only replied to Gazrok because the topic shifted slightly to protection of location and resources, but anyone can interject whenever.

I would think that if the SHTF then communications would be crucial as to when it was safe to leave one's dwelling and get together to join as a community, because within numbers is safety and varied useful skills and resources for survival. So, your ideas are brilliant, especially changing frequencies, which seems the easiest way.



posted on May, 19 2016 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

Thanks for your posts In The Light, I enjoyed the link to the Burlington Amateur Radio Club and the Ham Fest. I would assume that you are or know people who are amateur radio operators. Personally, although the unlicensed frequencies are limited in bands, output power, and uses, I like the anonymity of not being on the F.C.C.'s call sign listing. I can get a lot of information on Hams by looking up their call signs to find who and where they are. I have been giving some consideration on getting a license for the general mobile radio service as many stores carry units that operate on those frequencies and you can use your own repeaters in a private network. You have to pay for the license, but it really isn't that much considering.

Because of the CB craze back in the 1970s, many people have CBs gathering dust in their garages or basements, plus the price is low and availability high for such equipment. I had enough equipment laying around to put together a base and mobile along with a few handhelds. The base antenna I have was brand new in the box and sat for many years without use until I put it up a couple years ago. CBs are commonly found at garage sales and flea markets for cheap.

My neighbor is involved in the township trash collection days and does a lot of metal scraping. I was looking at his pile of junk and he gave me (for free) a working Uniden 40 channel SSB CB, an Astatic modulated base microphone and a tube-type amplifier. I also have a number of units in need of repair. I had enough equipment in storage to get a friend of mine setup with a mobile unit as well. CBs are a good way for people to get into two-way communications without going into Ham radio operation. The unlicensed frequencies seem like a good way to start a local, open source communications network in spite of the limitations.



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

We are thinking of RVing during retirement and CBing would fit right in, so I just posted my community Hamfest webpage to make the point to join a ham group and get to know the people you might be contacting before and after the SHTF. I was a CBer and also had my marine VHF licence quite a while ago, but ham radio always interested me. It just seems for my purposes in the near future that CBing would be the way to go.
edit on 21-5-2016 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2016 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight


That is a good point you have. I could get involved with the local amateur radio operators without getting the Ham ticket. Enough of those guys still use CBs I could stay in contact with them but not have the ham license. I monitor the repeaters anyway, if they know I'm out there they could direct some messages my way without having to actually use the amateur frequencies. Something to consider at any rate.




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