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The best place to put your router, according to physics

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posted on May, 13 2016 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: mOjOm
a reply to: BO XIAN

That's disturbing to say the least. You think someone would have thought about making something that runs your heart a bit more stable and secure than that.

If you're unsure about what signals might effect you I'd say shut down the wifi and just go with wired connection then. You can even use shielded cable just to be extra, extra safe.


Thanks for the input.

The manufacturer said they were working to resolve the vulnerability to EMF but had not come up with anything yet.

The WiFi is purportedly no problem. I just want to minimize any potential problem.

Yeah, the cell phone advice was interesting. I still sometimes catch myself raising it to my left ear. I always use speaker phone to avoid holding it too close to my ear, as well.

And, I can't open the hood of a running car.

I'm wondering about some sort of shielding worn over my left shoulder area. LOL. Particularly if it seems like the war drums are beating very greatly and acceleratingly loudly in coming months. LOL.




posted on May, 13 2016 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese

That's correct. I think the real danger is being but an earlobe away from your skull. I'm not all too concerned about microwave radiation from my own wifi, but when I think about the average amount of networks which are picked up from any given location inside a metro area, combined with 4G, and regular cullular networks, that's when I start to wonder. We've expanded exposure to microwave radiation a couple orders of magnitude in the last 30 years, most of that in the 21st century.


AGREED.

I still think that there are subtle effects that build up over time that are not getting due attention.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Line of sight and put it up high because these 'bags of water' keep moving around and will occasionally shadow the signals.

Also, it is a two-ended thing. You can also place the WiFi receiver as well as the AP to optimize signal.

Optimizing signal will not always make your WiFi faster. WiFi can transmit at its highest speeds with surprisingly low signal and newer ones also use multiple aerials and processing smarts to get a better transfer rate.

edit on 13/5/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Most WiFi's consume about 60-80 Watts, putting out milliwatts.

You get more output power from a standard D cell torch.

Higher powered commercial units usually have fairly large heatsinks and don't get their power through a small wall-wart adapter.

edit on 13/5/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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Glad to see a PHD student figured out that it's better to have air than a wall between the two pieces of equipment.

Who would have thought that...



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

I trust you mean milliwatts.

Commercial switches rarely use 60-80w without powered ethernet.

Pretty sure guy was referring to the power used in WIFI transmission, this is almost always under 500mw out of the box.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: chr0naut

I trust you mean milliwatts.

Commercial switches rarely use 60-80w without powered ethernet.

Pretty sure guy was referring to the power used in WIFI transmission, this is almost always under 500mw out of the box.


I was talking about the power supplied to the WiFi. You are correct, the output is way less and I have edited my post.




posted on May, 13 2016 @ 05:37 PM
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If you have older Linksys modems you can flash them with a third party bios and set them up as an access point/repeater. I have done this with an older WRT54G router which repeats my internet and network out to my workshop and it works flawlessly.

Here is the bios I use and there are YouTube videos on how to set it up. The third party bios is MUCH better than the original and also allows for adjusting TX power.

So check yard sales for older Linksys routers and increase your WiFi coverage.

Here is the link...

Linky



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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Look up broadband over power lines
edit on 13-5-2016 by MarsIsRed because: (no reason given)
. Wireless always sucks...
edit on 13-5-2016 by MarsIsRed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 07:30 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: BO XIAN

Line of sight and put it up high because these 'bags of water' keep moving around and will occasionally shadow the signals.

Also, it is a two-ended thing. You can also place the WiFi receiver as well as the AP to optimize signal.

Optimizing signal will not always make your WiFi faster. WiFi can transmit at its highest speeds with surprisingly low signal and newer ones also use multiple aerials and processing smarts to get a better transfer rate.


I don't think I've ever had a throughput problem. I have DSL via the landline phone company. The company has changed names/hands several times since we signed up for the service in 1952.

Thx thx.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 07:37 PM
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What about the power of WI first as in 5g vs 2.4g



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

And, my WiFi router/modem is pretty much within line of sight of my desktop. At least, there's not much between them in terms of RF opaqueness.

It's impossible for my router to be in line of sight of all of my wireless devices, but it seems to work fine.

For example, my television is three walls away from my router, and my Netflix and other TV streaming services seem to work fine on my TV. I use my iPad or iPhone on another floor from my router (through the floor and through walls), and it seems to be OK. I can also get my WiFi outside of my house through 5 walls and about 50+ feet.




Yep me to and old plaster lath walls. Anyone wanting to get down to it has to run cat 7 from the main RT to each devise. If you pay for faster speed, for gaming, unless you run cat to the x-box you will never get full high speed you are paying for. over.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: Terminal1

I use DD-WRT also on my old linksys wireless G router. It's much better than the original setup. Way more functional.

Probably one of the best freely distributed piece of software ever. Very nice little project IMO.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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I will tell you a much better way to set up your WiFi without any math, with one simple fact...

Radio waves is just light!!

Yes, light, but its invisible light opposed to visible light, and it can pass through some materials easier than visible light, so its better in a sense.

But in the end, think of your WiFi router and antenna as if it were a bright light. So bright that it will light up your room, and reflect off of walls, enough to reflect around corners, and end up in another room dim but enough to pass the signal. You can even use tin foil to help direct it around like a mirror does for visible light.

Have at it.

edit on 13-5-2016 by WeAre0ne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2016 @ 12:51 AM
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Here's a small set of 'do it yourself' optimization articles.

One of the most useful of all, once you understand the obvious (like the fewer walls the better, central is better, try to keep it on the same floor), is to check out which channels your neighbors are using and pick another. Most people use channel 1-6 as it is the default setting right out of the box, so another less crowded channel should get you better speed and reliability.

APC Magazine: FIve Wi-FI mistakes (and how to fix them)

APC Magazine: 7 ways to maximise your Wi-Fi speeds

An other option is to use your old Wi-Fi modem as range extender. When I upgraded my old modem (located in my upstairs office) I took it downstairs and ran a cable down near the TV in the lounge. Now I have a wired router next to my internet radio receiver, my smart TV, and my smart BluRay player and the wireless signal downstairs is great. It used to be very weak near the TV's for example.



posted on May, 15 2016 @ 01:12 AM
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originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha
a reply to: BO XIAN

I'm not a tech expert. I am a noob cable guy. I always put routers in the most open, central location in the home.

More walls means more problems.

If you have weak signal, move it until you don't.

I expect my honorary Ph.D. in the mail.


My mate makes £50K a year doing what you just said. some days he makes £300 for switching it off then on again.




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