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The best place to put your router, according to physics

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posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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MASHABLE.com

Jason Cole, PhD student at Imperial College London for The Conversation
Mar 25, 2015

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mashable.com...
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Armed with the knowledge of Maxwell's equations and how to solve them, I recently turned my attention to a much simpler but more widespread problem, that of how to simulate and therefore improve the Wi-Fi reception in my flat. While "sufficiently powerful" in an academic sense often means supercomputers with tens of thousands of processors running in parallel, in this case, the sufficiently powerful computer required to run the program turned out to be a smartphone..
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The first lesson is clear, if obvious: Wi-Fi signals travels much more easily through free space than walls, so the ideal router position has line-of-sight to where you'll be using it.
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So the second lesson is less obvious and more interesting: if reception is poor in a particular position, even a slight change of the router's position may produce significant improvement in signal strength, as any signal dark spots will also move.
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In spite of having been a Navy Radioman, I'm pretty ignorant--particularly at my age--about such tech. And, I'm not particularly gifted about math, even though my Dissertation was very statistics heavy. LOL.

And, my WiFi router/modem is pretty much within line of sight of my desktop. At least, there's not much between them in terms of RF opaqueness.

But I thought this article might be of value to others.

And, I was curious about what our tech experts at ATS thought of it.

I hope they let us know.




posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

I'm not a tech expert. I am a noob cable guy. I always put routers in the most open, central location in the home.

More walls means more problems.

If you have weak signal, move it until you don't.

I expect my honorary Ph.D. in the mail.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: NarcolepticBuddha

I love common sense solutions to problems. LOL.

I could say that the honorary PhD was in the mail, but I'd be lying. LOL.

Thanks for your kind reply.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:41 AM
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And, my WiFi router/modem is pretty much within line of sight of my desktop. At least, there's not much between them in terms of RF opaqueness.

It's impossible for my router to be in line of sight of all of my wireless devices, but it seems to work fine.

For example, my television is three walls away from my router, and my Netflix and other TV streaming services seem to work fine on my TV. I use my iPad or iPhone on another floor from my router (through the floor and through walls), and it seems to be OK. I can also get my WiFi outside of my house through 5 walls and about 50+ feet.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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I run services out of my residence, so they all have wired connections. Wireless connections are limited by the protocol, and that's a good thing. It means I have to manually throttle my personal usage less. The router is located at the upstairs office, which is open to the living/dining room on the first floor. It's fairly centralized, but reception is not so good in my downstairs office which I use a lot. That's actually okay, it means I get 1-2MBps, instead of hogging the 300mbps line which would be a huge no-no.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Can someone enlighten me as to the difference between having a Router with a built-in modem versus having the router and as modem separate units? I have Comcast/Xfinity and have one of the devices that combines the two, and my wifi is beyond horrible.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

It's exactly as you said. You have the gateway and modem hooked into one device. Some are designed better than others. Most people with advanced needs find that they are better suited to bypass the default gateway using it as a modem only, hooking in their own router. You could likely do this if it was so much of an issue.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

thanks buddy, I need to get a new setup. I'll be getting a separate router this weekend then



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

The most expensive routers do you no good if there is something interfering with the signal.

I suggest holding off on the lead paint



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I wonder what the power of the signals from the major routers are.

Anyone know?

And what are the implications for health. i.e. It's best to be a minimum of _______ feet from the average router???



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

If you're not using a direct pass-through mode of some sort, make sure that the DHCP servers on each router don't issue conflicting IP addresses, else you will have issues.

You can't route the same address to two physical devices.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

Great question.

Someone who knows something in this field will have to respond more meaningfully, if you are to get any help on this thread! LOL.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:53 AM
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I always use inSSIDer for checking signal strength to the router. But theres lots of other programs that do that same as well.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: pl3bscheese
a reply to: FamCore

conflicting IP addresses


In that case it just plain won't work. No amount of cord jiggling will boost signal



edit on 13-5-2016 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: BO XIAN
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I wonder what the power of the signals from the major routers are.

Anyone know?

And what are the implications for health. i.e. It's best to be a minimum of _______ feet from the average router???


Power range is limited by the FCC most devices put out from 50-200 milliwatts.

The health implications of microwave radiation is a hot debate, with conflicting information coming out from one set of studies to the next. I think separating the industry funded studies from independent studies is best here, and the results seem to indicate, at least in terms of using low power non-ionizing radiation put to our skull (talking on a cell phone), that there are observable deletrious health consequences of their usage. As for using wireless devices further away from your person, I think the effects are much less serious.
edit on 13-5-2016 by pl3bscheese because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

Cable Modems are giving you access to your ISP. Routers route data packets and bridge networks. The internet is one big community public network. Your ISP will most likely have you as a part of their own private network that is bridged to the internet. With your router you can then be your own private network, bridged to your ISP private network which is then bridged to the internet.

You said you have Comcast. That's pretty much how they do it. You'll have one external IP that's is public that many users are a part of. Then behind that you'll get an IP like 10.xxx.xxx.xxx or something. That is a unique private address for you. With your own router you can then have your own network behind that with IP like 192.168.xxx.xxx. Each bridge is a gateway from one private network to another and the internet.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: BO XIAN
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

I wonder what the power of the signals from the major routers are.

Anyone know?

And what are the implications for health. i.e. It's best to be a minimum of _______ feet from the average router???


I wouldn't recommend wearing one as a hat or athletic support. But other than that I doubt it's any more harmful than cell phones at our ears or being swamped with EM waves from every possible direction 24/7 like we are now.

Don't us it as a pillow either.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 11:15 AM
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As far as placement goes. Usually centralized is the most effective. Typically elevated location is best as well.

Besides that there are other things to consider as well. The type of antenna used. Channel setting. Type of wifi used such as b, g, or n.

Factory set devices use the same channel settings so too many devices all using the same channel can give you some problems. Use n when possible and even better limit all devices to use only n if you can and drop the b, and g. Radial antenna broadcast out in all directions while directional is obviously directed where you point it. Radial antenna work well for a limited area uniformly while directional only work where directed but with a better signal and range.



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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Get on the "windsurfer" bus. It works.

Of course, results may vary.

www.freeantennas.com...



posted on May, 13 2016 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Do you use the DYI reflector thing??? Have you had success with it that is noticeable??? I've heard mixed reviews but I've never tried it.

I figure those with no success might not be doing it like they should. Using a reflective surface it's important to get everything just right to focus the signal.

What's your opinion???



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