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Can dreams be as fulfilling as realty?

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posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:18 AM
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Assume an event; sky diving for example. In the real world you plan a trip to sky dive; get in that air plane and jump out and have a wild ride.

During the event you feel the rush of adrenalin; you are happy; you get to experience sights you do not normally get to; ect ect.

After the event you have the memories to carry with you for the rest of your life.



Now assume instead of actually sky diving in reality you have a dream about it. How is this any different from reality:

During the event you feel the rush of adrenalin; you are happy; you get to experience sights you do not normally get to; ect ect.

After the event you have the memories to carry with you for the rest of your life.



Now yes there are different types of dreams; some are disjointed and erratic; others dull an hard to remember. But some dreams can be incredibly realistic and hyper sensorial and memorable. You can even train your brain into having more of the later type dreams.


So can dreams substitute for reality? Or is there some quality to reality that a dream can never achieve?




posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

I like dreaming of falling without parachutes better. What a rush.

Nothing happens when I hit the ground, because its a dream.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

No, no they can't, infact often they are worse much worse than reality and symbolically put your stresses into animation, if you are sad in waking life you are inprisoned in the dream world..



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

Dreams can be a lot of fun. I like flying and floating when I am lucid dreaming. I also enjoy the complex stories of some of my dreams. I write them down when I wake up if they are really cool



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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The other night I had a lucid dream that I was being chased through some kind of Disney creative headquarters. As I was running and looking in rooms I thought, "I'm so hungry." I escaped into a door, and locked it, there on the table were weird flavours of experimental peanut butter cups. It was amazing.

But...would I rather dream and starve, or wake up and eat breakfast?



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct
I'll take breakfast, eggs and bacon please







posted on May, 12 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

This is where you get into a quagmire, to be honest. From a western / orthodox point of view, the answer is probably "of course not." We tend to place quite a value on "real life experiences," and very little on dreams.

From the perspective of traditional Australian aboriginal beliefs regarding "dreamland," and "dreaming," there isn't much difference, however. Western audiences are already familiar with this perspective by the way: Neo uses it in the Matrix to learn Kung Fu, and to fly Helicopters.

I'm certain that it is already a hot topic of discussion among philosophers. Behavioral scientists are likewise intrigued. Imagine a world where purposeful (mindful) subconscious states do have an impact on the real world cognitive functions of human participants?

Except they already do. As was pointed out, above, humans have long used dream experiences to augment their waking cognition. Some of the most famous examples have come from writers, such as Dante, but I digress.

I have even spoken to guitar players who insist that if you practice playing enough just before bed, you will often wake with the ability to play even better than you did before sleeping, the night before. Anecdotal? Absolutely. But it is already happening to lots of people, whether we believe them or not.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: DanDanDat
So can dreams substitute for reality? Or is there some quality to reality that a dream can never achieve?

Is dreaming not reality?
Reality is what is happening - so when there is dreaming happening that is reality.

How can it be proved that this is not dreaming?



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

Dreams are fun sometimes but they never really compare to the real thing, sex dreams are great example. Dreams about drugs is another good example, I have had dreams where I smoke a bunch of pot but the feeling in the dream has not beeb close at all to what the effects of Cannabis actually feel like.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

When dreams are as fulfilling as reality, it is only because they are a consolation for an unfulfilling life.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: DanDanDat

Dreams can be the same. Especially lucid dreams. but it is rare.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: DanDanDat

When dreams are as fulfilling as reality, it is only because they are a consolation for an unfulfilling life.


That is just a slight re-wording of a quote found all over the net.
edit on 12-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: reldra




That is just a slight re-wording of a quote found all over the net.


Which one?



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: reldra




That is just a slight re-wording of a quote found all over the net.


Which one?


Here's one

Unfulfilled desires getting fulfilled in dreams is what ninety-five percent of human dreams belong to I would say.


source

There are a bunch that are pretty close.

Most scientists say dreams are to 'process what hapened during the day'. Some are.

But, being someone that has had dreams occur later in waking life, down to the last detail within 3-4 days, there is a bit more going on there.

I have an appointment with doctor that specializes in sleep stuidies on June 27, he is also a cardio-pulmonary doctor. I finaly got a referral for insurance purposes. No sleep medication currently available will stop this. I have been through all of them That apointment will lead to a 'sleep study'. I spend 90% of my sleep in REM sleep. That is not normal. I hope this doctor can get tho the bottom of this.
edit on 12-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-5-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: reldra

I wouldn't say dreams are "unfulfilled desires getting fulfilled", only that fulfillment is a property of being awake, not of dreams.




I have an appointment with doctor that specializes in sleep stuidies on June 27, he is also a cardio-pulmonary doctor. I finaly got a referral for insurance purposes. No sleep medication currently available will stop this. I have been through all of them That apointment will lead to a 'sleep study'. I spend 90% of my sleep in REM sleep. That is not normal. I hope this doctor can get tho the bottom of this.


Is it affecting your sleep? What are your dreams like?
edit on 12-5-2016 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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I'd say the greatest limiting factor is coherency. Meaning, for most, each dream is kind of its own world. Things you build and accomplish may not be there the next night. Beyond that, they may not even be remembered to realize they are no longer there. While awake, this is a completely different experience.

It is certainly possible to have this coherency night-to-night, but I can't say its common beyond a couple nights, or re-occuring dreams.

I think that for most, the meaning is derived from how a single, profound dream experience impacts perception/experience after waking. In that, many dream experiences may very well be deeply meaningful, even moreso than most (or all) experiences while awake. But, that meaning is derived almost entirely by how the dream impacts the "waking world."



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: DanDanDat




So can dreams substitute for reality?


Dreams are reality, just not as persistent as waking reality. We are multi-dimensional.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: DanDanDat
From the perspective of traditional Australian aboriginal beliefs regarding "dreamland," and "dreaming," there isn't much difference, however.


"Dreamtime" or "the dreaming" is a misnomer, its not referring to physical dreaming... it's actually just a way of describing the Aboriginals intimate relationship with the land, which the English language has no accurate translation for.

But anyway... dreams can definitely be as fulfilling as real life, imo... Only problem is, just like a drug, you always have to eventually wake up and deal with reality.

The only difference between physically doing something amazing and/or exciting and just dreaming it, is that physically doing it gives you bragging rights.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 04:23 PM
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sa reply to: DanDanDat

When I lived in Mexico, I consulted with a curandera and she told me of certain "spices" That allow one to almost chose what kind of dream the want. And they are VIVID.....



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

I think your referring to a plant commonly called 'Mexican dream herb', the species is Calea Zacatechichi.

Never personally had much luck with it myself, tbh.



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