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Syrian Refugees In My Town Making Me Nervous

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posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: KTemplar

Tomorrow I'm going to one of their stores to xhex it out for fun




posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I worked with a kid WAY back in the day that was from Afghanistan and he was entirely messed up in the head. I think he was about 12 and would say some pretty alarming stuff about his hate for America and not caring when Americans or civilians were murdered. Yeah, kids are dumb and I think we had gone in 2 years prior, but it was pretty surreal to hear some of the stuff. Actually surprised they didn't fire him, was a small shop and he worked like an hour every other day for extra money.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
OK I'm not a Muslim hater ok Muhammad Ali is a Muslim.

They aren't all bad.

However, they have been moving in a bunch of Syrian refugees into my town and helping them open businesses. They walk around in their burqas and don't talk to us infidels, not exactly friendly.

I don't know what to make of it so I'm wondering if anyone else has Syrians moving into their towns and what do they think, how do you feel?

I can't tell if I'm being conditioned or if I have legitimate concerns. Can I go to concerts and gatherings in the area without worrying anymore are we going to have parts of our town shut down to outsiders and Christians like in London ?

Can they co-exist with Christians, this is a very Christian populated area I mean I just don't know.

I have another question..

Do these women continue to wear burqas because they believe in them or do they have to because of their husbands?

Don't you think they would want to experience the freedom that the women in our country have.


My closest neighbor is Iranian Shia. His wife wears the Hijab. They are very nice people, she is an excellent cook. He enjoys watching basketball and NFL football.

Try being friendly, see what happens. I imagine if you were newly arrived in Syria that you might keep to yourself at first.

Yes, you can continue to go to concerts, continue to do what you do.

LA has the highest Iranian population outside Iran, won't see any Sharia law there any time soon. So i suspect the OC is probably safe as well.
edit on 8-5-2016 by bg_socalif because: fat fingers on the keyboard.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: bg_socalif

I know I used to live in Orange County I'm friends with some Assyrians. Good people very hospitable. Their families fled persecution they are Christians.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

To be honest if I lived in some of the countrys that America "liberated " I would probably have some harsh things to say as well.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

I think the Afghanny population is more radicalized.

At least Russia and the US struggled ghd most in Afghanistan.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: Joecanada11
a reply to: Domo1

To be honest if I lived in some of the countrys that America "liberated " I would probably have some harsh things to say as well.


And that hit the nail on the head.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I have not noticed any problems here in Pittsburgh. Infact they were here before it was made official. Now this goes back a wee bit too.

Common crimes still persist with dumb people here. Native pittsburgher's of course. But so far in Sharpsburg ( suburb ) or Whitehall (suburb) for example, you'd have no clue.

Here's an article with the Mayor of Pittsburgh..


www.wpxi.com...


I should make note. Once the cat was out of the bag...... 500+ were already here. 😊

edit on 8-5-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-5-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I live in a city that is home to one of the nation's largest populations of Syrians.

Honestly, we don't have many issues.

A few years ago there were some demonstrations, when there was something going on between the US and Syria. There were crowds marching through the city, carrying Syrian flags. They congregated then outside one of our largest malls. It was a bit disconcerting to come out of the mall and see that going on. It was big in the news for a few days.

The concerning part about that was that it shows that many still hold a strong attachment to their homeland, and seem to put that above their loyalty to the US.

There seems to be some division within their population regarding immigrants. Some want them to be welcomed. Others voice open concern for the potential of terrorism.

Some want to integrate and become American. Others hold fast to the ways of their homeland.

Otherwise, we live in peace.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

Interesting so even fellow Syrians are concerned.

Anywhere I can read about that?



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

This is a pretty good article about it:
In America's Little Syria, a divide on accepting refugees

And yeah, it's called "Little Syria".

ETA: another:
Allentown's Syrian population divided over refugees
edit on 5/8/16 by BlueAjah because: eta



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:38 PM
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We have had some refugees come here, they certainly have not caused any problems but they are having a hard time financially..it has gotten very expensive to live here, I myself questioned why they are being located in the most expensive city in Canada but I guess the infrastructure and services are here.
As for the Burka, it's how they were raised and what they know..part of their identity. I think we feel they are oppressed but for the most part I do not think they see it like that.
My mom who is lilly white is married to a muslim man, he considers himself muslim but not devout. He is just a regular guy, works in the movie industry and would enjoy a beer or two or three with you and talk about soccer or basketball. They have been to Sudan to visit his family a few times staying for a month or so, my mom was treated like one of the family and the only thing that bugged her was after dinner the men congregated together to talk men stuff and the womenfolk were to hang out and do women stuff..lol. My mom is pretty independent and has the same concerns about the burka, the women in Dom's family wear the scarf and not the full face covering..I don't think she came away from it thinking they were forced or oppressed.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:39 PM
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a reply to: BlueAjah

Oh your only an hour away.

Wonder why Pennsylvania is taking in so many or are there just that many coming in?



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:42 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

I think its because the community has actually been around for a long time. It has been growing since long before the recent exodus. Because there is already a strong community, and there are resources available to support them, it is an attractive location for the recent immigrants.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:44 PM
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originally posted by: BlueAjah
a reply to: onequestion

This is a pretty good article about it:
In America's Little Syria, a divide on accepting refugees

And yeah, it's called "Little Syria".

ETA: another:
Allentown's Syrian population divided over refugees


It's good to know the Syrian community itself has the same concerns that I do.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: BlueAjah
a reply to: onequestion

I think its because the community has actually been around for a long time. It has been growing since long before the recent exodus. Because there is already a strong community, and there are resources available to support them, it is an attractive location for the recent immigrants.


Well as your aware of these people are.coming to change resistant areas I'm sure they are being met with silent oppression to a small degree.



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

Are you in Vancouver ?



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:47 PM
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a reply to: Joecanada11

Haha, yes indeed..well very close.
edit on 8-5-2016 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Kali74


There are also numerous places in England considered “no-go” zones

Chief Inspector of Constabulary Tom Winsor confirmed why police officers do not respond in some neighborhoods: There are some communities born under other skies who will not involve the police at all. I am reluctant to name the communities in question, but there are communities from other cultures who would prefer to police themselves. There are cities in the Midlands where the police never go because they are never called. They never hear of any trouble because the community deals with that on its own. It’s not that the police are afraid to go into these areas or don’t want to go into those areas. But if the police don’t get calls for help then, of course, they won’t know what’s going on. Muslim Patrol groups often regulate no-go zones.
You can see more on: www.breitbart.com...



posted on May, 8 2016 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

Notice the source of their concerns. The potential for terrorism is just part of it.


They are mostly Christian and, in no small number, support Syrian President Bashar al-Assad - a dynamic that's prompting some of them to oppose the resettlement of refugees, who are Muslim and say they fled violence perpetrated by the Assad regime.



worries some Syrian refugees might have taken part in the fighting in Syria's civil war and have "blood on their hands."



Three refugees spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they worry the Assad government has informants in the city of about 120,000 - a widely held belief among Syrians here, both Christian and Muslim - and will retaliate against family back home.


So, its as if the problems the established community escaped from long ago is now following them here. There are going to be people on both sides of a civil war going on in their homeland now trying to live together here. Some fear there will be trouble within the community. And that it could even spill back to their families still in Syria.

I feel bad for them for the scary situation.


edit on 5/8/16 by BlueAjah because: spelling



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