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How to Bring up the Touchy Subject of Possibly Rehoming a Pet?

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posted on May, 6 2016 @ 12:59 PM
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I'm looking for advice from members who may have had to re home a pet or have requested a pet be rehomed.

Here's the situation:

We have two lizards, and a baby on the way. The lizards are supposed to live with someone else anyways, but they just don't have a good set up. We really don't mind having the 'zardos, they're no work and do nothing. BUT... Lizards = salmonella. This is an undisputed fact. My doctor mentioned that the lizards could potentially spread salmonella to the baby, even if the baby is never near the lizards and we always washed our hands after touching them.

I took her advice to heart, but I always do my own research. I contacted our reptile vet, and she told me the same thing. I did some research online, and most sources warned of the salmonella issue. Most of the people saying that they had babies and lizards together seemed to have an air of, " No one is going to tell me what to do, so I just won't listen."

Now, I don't know the best way to bring this up to my partner. He really enjoys the lizards. Asking the real owner of the lizards to take them will cause a bit of drama, as they always have an excuse, and they can be quite emotional and dramatic about everything. They also have small children.

How can I best navigate the issue without over blowing the situation? My partner and I are excellent at talking things out, it's just that, I love the lizards too, and I feel very guilty. The health of the baby comes first though.

Another point. The lizards can be expensive. Between vets, electricity, food, etc. some months it can add up. We can afford it, but how will we ever rehome them if we are honest and say, "Oh, by the way, if the lizard can't shed, you can't just let it's toes fall off. The vet bill is about $250 a few times a year."

Between the real guilt and the imagined pregnancy hormone overdrive, I could use some advice!




posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Hi there! I've been wondering how you are doing and how the pregnancy is going.

I'm short on time, so quick and not so sweet. Regarding:



Asking the real owner of the lizards to take them will cause a bit of drama


There's your problem and solution all rolled up into one. If you are not the "legal" owner, then you can't "legally" do anything with them, except to return them to the owner, and shield yourself from any so called drama. Not your problem. You have more important things to consider here and you are doing just that. Trust that your friend will understand. If they don't, then reconsider the friendship...sometimes, someone has to volunteer to be the grown up!

You are doing the right thing and we are ALL behind you!

CF



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:19 PM
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Step 1: make a stew
Step 2: invite all interested parties over to talk about the lizards
Step 3: open the conversation with, "Nothing like a warm bowl of lizard stew with your closest friends"
Step 4: ????

 


I kid, i kid.

I approach life like a linebacker: step up into the hole and take whatever is coming through head on. So for me the answer is: give the original owners a chance to take them before listing them on Craigslist.

A bit cold? Yeah, but im not one to let someone elses mental instability keep me from doing what is necessary from a life safety perspective.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan




"Nothing like a warm bowl of lizard stew with your closest friends"


Oh, man, I needed that laugh!

CF



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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Thanks for the lightheartedness guys. I'm hoping if I just voice my concerns to my partner, maybe we can tackle talking to the lizards owner together. Maybe they'll prefer another lizard lover take them on.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
we can tackle talking to the lizards owner together.





that is the right answer, i think. It would be for me, anyway.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 01:33 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
Hey, you might be kidding, but if they are iguanas that are big enough to bother cleaning up, it would be a meal. People eat a lot of them in Central America.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 02:11 PM
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I think a previous poster nailed it. Talk to the original owner together. Explain to them that you don't want to put your child at risk for salmonella. They have children so hopefully they'll understand. Unless the reason you have them is because they don't want to put their children at risk. (Hey, this is a conspiracy site).



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

a text in incomplete sentences for sure



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 05:17 PM
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If all else fails, ask if a pet store would be willing to take them.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 08:16 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
I'm looking for advice from members who may have had to re home a pet or have requested a pet be rehomed.

Here's the situation:

We have two lizards, and a baby on the way. The lizards are supposed to live with someone else anyways, but they just don't have a good set up. We really don't mind having the 'zardos, they're no work and do nothing. BUT... Lizards = salmonella. This is an undisputed fact. My doctor mentioned that the lizards could potentially spread salmonella to the baby, even if the baby is never near the lizards and we always washed our hands after touching them.

I took her advice to heart, but I always do my own research. I contacted our reptile vet, and she told me the same thing. I did some research online, and most sources warned of the salmonella issue. Most of the people saying that they had babies and lizards together seemed to have an air of, " No one is going to tell me what to do, so I just won't listen."

Now, I don't know the best way to bring this up to my partner. He really enjoys the lizards. Asking the real owner of the lizards to take them will cause a bit of drama, as they always have an excuse, and they can be quite emotional and dramatic about everything. They also have small children.

How can I best navigate the issue without over blowing the situation? My partner and I are excellent at talking things out, it's just that, I love the lizards too, and I feel very guilty. The health of the baby comes first though.

Another point. The lizards can be expensive. Between vets, electricity, food, etc. some months it can add up. We can afford it, but how will we ever rehome them if we are honest and say, "Oh, by the way, if the lizard can't shed, you can't just let it's toes fall off. The vet bill is about $250 a few times a year."

Between the real guilt and the imagined pregnancy hormone overdrive, I could use some advice!


First of all, unless you or your partner are handling the lizards and then not washing your hands and then putting your hands in your mouth, you are not at risk of contracting salmonella. You'd have a higher risk of getting it from eating in a restaurant or even at home from food contamination.

If that is truly your concern, proper hygiene will be plenty sufficient to keep you safe. Wash your hands with soap and warm water, and antibacterial cleaner for any surfaces a lizard might have been allowed to walk on. Not all lizards carry salmonella. It's far more common in wild caught lizards but it's random.

If it's the money thing, then that's going to be a bit more tricky. I'd say that any financial discussions you've had in the past would probably be a good gauge of how that would go for you in this situation. If they've been bad, you might want to really think about how you come across if you do bring it up.

I wish you the best. I know it's frustrating, but you're really OK as far as the health issue. I was told by my physician when I was pregnant that I'd have to rehome my cat, because of toxoplasmosis.

Well, I went home and did some research and found that it's only contained in fecal matter, and proper hand hygiene after cleaning the litter box was all that was required, something I did anyway (disgusting to think people wouldn't!). But I know several people who gave away beloved family pets because they didn't check into it past the standard physician warning.

I hope it works out for you and will keep my fingers crossed for you. Good luck!



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

If my vet told me the lizards salmonella, they have it 100%, could spread with almost no effort, then I'm inclined to believe her.



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 08:48 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
I was just thinking that she could always eat them. Then I scrolled down and saw your post. I'm glad I wasn't drinking anything at the time lol.



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 01:53 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
Step 1: make a stew
Step 2: invite all interested parties over to talk about the lizards
Step 3: open the conversation with, "Nothing like a warm bowl of lizard stew with your closest friends"
Step 4: ????

 


I kid, i kid.

I approach life like a linebacker: step up into the hole and take whatever is coming through head on. So for me the answer is: give the original owners a chance to take them before listing them on Craigslist.

A bit cold? Yeah, but im not one to let someone elses mental instability keep me from doing what is necessary from a life safety perspective.


Hey...if they cook the lizards, at least there's no more salmonella to worry about right?



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 02:02 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen




Hey...if they cook the lizards, at least there's no more salmonella to worry about right?


Lol. What temperature does a lizard need to reach before it's safe to consume? All I know is chicken and beef.

-----

OP rehoming a pet you're keeping for someone else when there's a medical concern shouldn't make you feel guilty. Especially if it's a lizard(s) since they don't form a bond with you. If it's a cat or dog, yeah, explore every option. Lizard? Lizard don't care. You might be attached to it, but it's not going to be sad if it gets a new owner.

I think you're a good person for being concerned though. Just find a good home or get the owner to take them back.



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 04:06 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: tigertatzen

If my vet told me the lizards salmonella, they have it 100%, could spread with almost no effort, then I'm inclined to believe her.


Oh by all means, believe a veterinarian about the behavior of a human illness if you like. I just thought you were all broken up with guilt and sadness as you portrayed in your post, so I thought I'd reassure you with some facts. My mistake. Good luck anyway though.



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 04:23 AM
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originally posted by: Domo1
a reply to: tigertatzen




Hey...if they cook the lizards, at least there's no more salmonella to worry about right?


Lol. What temperature does a lizard need to reach before it's safe to consume? All I know is chicken and beef.

-----


Hmmmm...LOL...don't they say lizards taste just like chicken? Maybe it cooks up the same way.

Not planning to find out though! *shudder*

I'm glad to see someone say that about the guilt thing. The rescue community here are really bad about that. Sometimes it's just not feasible to keep a pet...especially an exotic.

I would never personally rehome a pet, barring some major injury or something that would keep me from caring for them. But I don't really consider my reptiles to be pets in the same way as my mammalian kids...probably due to the same reasons you mentioned.

The owners really should take the lizards back...if there's drama, surely that can be ignored. We see a lot of that too around here. Lots of people stuck with animals that they inherited...my friend just took her neighbors' dogs because they moved out, asked if she'd keep them in her yard while they moved their stuff...never came back for the dogs. It's ridiculous.

People like that just need a nice potted plant. Something they can ignore, like a cactus. Sigh...



posted on May, 7 2016 @ 04:42 AM
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Try making a list of the reasons you need to re-home the lizards.

Up to now you've mentioned two major issues: health and finances.

On the financial issue - why have you been bearing the brunt of the costs for someone else's pets?

On the health issue - why should you put your child at risk to spare someone else's?

Then there is the issue of time. New babies are time-consuming, apparently. So who is going to suffer if you and your husband can only spare the time for either the lizards or the baby?

The above is the sort of logical approach that might work to get your husband on board. He might object to at least one of your reasons but probably not all three.

You know your situation so I expect you could think of a few more, too.




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